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war establishment

The level of equipment and manning laid down for a military unit in wartime.

Giuseppe Garibaldi

Giuseppe Garibaldi (1807–82)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
128 words

...Giuseppe Garibaldi 1807 – 82 Italian patriot and military leader, who played a key role in the establishment of the united kingdom of Italy Men, I'm getting out of Rome. Anyone who wants to carry on the war against the outsiders, come with me. I can offer you neither honours nor wages; I offer you hunger, thirst, forced marches, battles and death. Anyone who loves his country, follow me. to his volunteer force of ‘Red Shirts’ Giuseppe Guerzoni Garibaldi (1882) vol. 1 (not a verbatim record) Men, I'm getting out of Rome neither ...

Alan Bennett

Alan Bennett (1934– )   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Modern Quotations (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
269 words

...it. Coral Browne to Guy Burgess An Englishman Abroad (1989) Shakespeare the word treason pissed in our soup pissed in our soup I have never understood this liking for war. It panders to instincts already catered for within the scope of any respectable domestic establishment. Forty Years On (1969) understood this liking for war instincts already catered for domestic establishment Sapper, Buchan, Dornford Yates, practitioners in that school of Snobbery with Violence that runs like a thread of good-class tweed through twentieth-century literature. Forty...

Alan Bennett

Alan Bennett (1934– )   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
289 words

...other families. Dinner at Noon (BBC television, 1988) Every family has a secret Every family has a secret not like other families I have never understood this liking for war. It panders to instincts already catered for within the scope of any respectable domestic establishment. Forty Years On (1969) act 1 liking for war panders to instincts respectable domestic establishment Memories are not shackles, Franklin, they are garlands. Forty Years On (1969) act 2 memories are not shackles Memories are not shackles they are garlands Standards are...

Bill of Rights

Bill of Rights   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of American Quotations (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
517 words

...an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. The Bill of Rights: Amendment 2 A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed. The Bill of Rights: Amendment 3 No soldier shall, in time of peace be quartered in any house, without the consent of the owner, nor in time of war, but...

John Adams

John Adams (1735–1826)   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of American Quotations (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
1,322 words

...Thoughts on Government , 1776 I consider the true history of the American Revolution, and the establishment of our present Constitution, as lost forever; and nothing but misrepresentations, or partial accounts of it, will ever be recovered. In particular, Adams referred to the lack of records of speeches in Congress from 1774 to 1776. A century later, Robert E. Lee (see below) and Walt Whitman expressed similar skepticism, doubting that the truth about the Civil War would ever be told quoted in Lt. Francis Hall, Travels in Canada and the United States in 1816...

Aneurin Bevan

Aneurin Bevan (1897–1960)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Modern Quotations (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
639 words

... society priorities have gone all wrong I read the newspapers avidly. It is my one form of continuous fiction. in Times 29 March 1960 read the newspapers avidly form of continuous fiction I stuffed their mouths with gold. on his handling of the consultants during the establishment of the National Health Service B. Abel-Smith The Hospitals 1800–1948 (1964) stuffed their mouths with gold stuffed their mouths with ...

George Washington

George Washington (1732–99)   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of American Quotations (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
1,715 words

...actions, but in the spring of 1780, after nearly four years of war, he still cautioned against reliance on them, telling Virginians when Nathanael Greene assumed command in the South: “We must have a permanent force, not a force that is constantly fluctuating and sliding from under us as a pedestal of ice would do from a statue in a summer's day.” letter to the president of Congress, Sept. 24, 1776 [United under one government, we] will avoid the necessity of those overgrown military establishments, which, under any form of government, are inauspicious to...

Adam Smith

Adam Smith (1723–90)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
799 words

...from the pockets If any of the provinces of the British empire cannot be made to contribute towards the support of the whole empire, it is surely time that Great Britain should free herself from the expense of defending those provinces in time of war, and of supporting any part of their civil or military establishments in time of peace, and endeavour to accommodate her future views and designs to the real mediocrity of her circumstances. Wealth of Nations (1776) bk. 5, ch. 3 provinces of the British empire Great Britain should free herself defending those...

Harold Macmillan

Harold Macmillan (18941986)   Reference library

Brewer's Famous Quotations

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
2,709 words

...of the Exchequer, had resigned over a disagreement about budget estimates. So ‘little local difficulties’ became a phrase used to demonstrate a dismissive lack of concern. Jaw-jaw is better than war-war. On 30 January 1958 in Canberra, Australia, Macmillan consciously echoed a saying of Winston Churchill's – ‘To jaw-jaw is always better than to war-war’ – which Churchill had uttered at a White House luncheon in Washington DC on 26 June 1954. What matters is that Mr Macmillan has let Mr [Selwyn] Lloyd know that at the Foreign Office, in these troubled...

Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Political Quotations (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
2,085 words

... Thomas Jefferson: A Chronology of His Thoughts (2002) so great advantage over another always cool and unruffled always cool and unruffled Banking establishments are more dangerous than standing armies. letter to John Taylor, 28 May 1816, in T. Jefferson Randolph (ed.) Memoirs, Correspondence & Private Papers of T. Jefferson (1829) vol. 3 banking establishments are more dangerous Banking establishments are more dangerous But this momentous question [ the Missouri Compromise ] , like a firebell in the night awakened and filled me with terror. I...

(Sir) Winston Churchill

(Sir) Winston Churchill (18741965)   Reference library

Brewer's Famous Quotations

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
7,872 words

...that Mr Mikardo was no oil painting, as the saying has it. In war, resolution; in defeat, defiance; in victory, magnanimity; in peace, goodwill. Churchill's history The Second World War was published in six volumes between 1948 and 1954. He took as the motto of the work some words that had occurred to him just after the First World War, as Eddie Marsh, at one time his Private Secretary, recalled: ‘He produced one day a lapidary epigram on the spirit proper to a great nation in war and peace … (I wish the tones in which he spoke this could have been...

Theodore Roosevelt

Theodore Roosevelt (1858–1919)   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of American Quotations (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
3,000 words

...war is the surest guaranty for peace. Here Assistant Secretary of the Navy Roosevelt referred to Washington's advice that military preparedness helps to prevent wars. Roosevelt's speech called for “a great navy…an armament fit for the nation's needs, not primarily to fight, but to avert fighting.” The president, however, was less than sincere here. He was an enthusiastic warrior, some would say warmonger. Washington, on the other hand, while advocating preparedness, was suspicious of military establishments Washington's Forgotten Maxim , speech, Naval War...

(Sir) Harold Wilson

(Sir) Harold Wilson (191695)   Reference library

Brewer's Famous Quotations

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
2,432 words

...that he had been unable to trace the saying, ‘Whoever is in office, the Conservatives are always in power.’ Perhaps a solution to the problem is that Harold Wilson may have made use of a sort of epigram format with several variables. In an essay contributed to The Establishment (ed. Hugh Thomas, 1959), Thomas Balogh (later Wilson's economic adviser) wrote: ‘The fact that the Treasury controls senior appointments, and that Ministers are busy men, does the rest. Mr Harold Wilson aptly put it: “Whoever is in office, the Whigs are in power” [Whigs here...

Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826)   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of American Quotations (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
4,114 words

...measured by the hour die with the hour. letter to David Harding, April 20, 1824 Merchants love nobody. letter to John Langdon, 1785 The selfish spirit of commerce knows no country, and feels no passion or principle but that of gain. letter to Larkin Smith, 1809 Banking establishments are more dangerous than standing armies. letter to John Taylor, May 28, 1816 Subject opinion to coercion: whom will you make your inquisitors? Fallible men; governed by bad passions, by private as well as public reasons. Notes on the State of Virginia , 1781–85 When we get...

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–82)   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of American Quotations (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
4,741 words

...conservatism goes for comfort, reform for truth. The Conservative , lecture, Boston, May 9, 1841 A party is perpetually corrupted by personality. Politics , in Essays: Second Series , 1844 There are always two parties, the party of the past and the party of the future: the establishment and the movement. Historic Notes of Life and Letters in New England , 1867 Poverty demoralizes. Wealth , in The Conduct of Life , 1860 Power ceases in the instant of repose. Self-Reliance , in Essays: First Series , 1841 You shall have joy, or you shall have power, said God;...

Alan Bennett

Alan Bennett (1934– )   Quick reference

Oxford Essential Quotations (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
252 words

...Alan Bennett 1934 –   English dramatist and actor I have never understood this liking for war. It panders to instincts already catered for within the scope of any respectable domestic establishment. Forty Years On (1969) act 1 Memories are not shackles, Franklin, they are garlands. Forty Years On (1969) act 2 Standards are always out of date. That is what makes them standards. Forty Years On (1969) act 2 standards are always out of date Standards are always out of date Sapper, Buchan, Dornford Yates, practitioners in that school of...

The Family

The Family   Quick reference

Oxford Essential Quotations (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
769 words

...and everyone always lives in an atmosphere of suppressed ill-feeling. Walter Bagehot 1826 – 77 English economist and essayist The English Constitution (ed. 2, 1872) introduction I have never understood this liking for war. It panders to instincts already catered for within the scope of any respectable domestic establishment. Alan Bennett 1934 –   English dramatist and actor Forty Years On (1969) act 1 We begin our public affections in our families. No cold relation is a zealous citizen. Edmund Burke 1729 – 97 Irish -born Whig ...

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