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war establishment

The level of equipment and manning laid down for a military unit in wartime.

Pericles

Pericles   Reference library

Sonia Massai and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,543 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...virgin and no prostitute: he leaves promising to help. The Bawd, outraged by Marina’s behaviour, orders Boult to deflower her, but she persuades him she will be more profitably employed in respectable activities such as sewing, weaving, and dancing. 20 Gower narrates Marina’s establishment as a singer and embroiderer, and the arrival of Pericles’ ship at Mytilene. 21 Lysimachus enquires after Pericles’ distemper and suggests that Marina might be able to cure him. Marina is sent for and sings to the silent Pericles. He initially pushes her away, but his interest...

London

London  

Reference type:
Overview Page
The first London ballet performances were given by French and Italians during the 17th and 18th centuries, though two English men, John Weaver (dancer, choreographer, teacher, and writer) and John ...
Harley Granville-Barker

Harley Granville-Barker  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(1877–1946)British actor, producer, playwright, and critic.Born in London, Granville-Barker began his career in Harrogate and in 1891 joined Sarah Thorne's repertory company in Margate. He made his ...
Israel

Israel  

After half a century of war and hostility, peace with the Palestinians seems as remote as everIsrael can be considered to have four main geographical regions. To the north is a hilly region that ...
Sicily

Sicily  

A large triangular island in the Mediterranean Sea, separated from the ‘toe’ of Italy by the narrow Strait of Messina. It forms, with the neighbouring islands of Lipari, Egadi, Ustica, and ...
Rome

Rome  

According to tradition the ancient city was founded by Romulus (after whom it is named) in 753 bc on the Palatine Hill; as it grew it spread to the other six hills of Rome (Aventine, Caelian, ...
Anti-War Musicals

Anti-War Musicals   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the American Musical

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Performing arts, Music
Length:
454 words

...the Civil War. Although such pacifist ideas were anathema in the 1950s and early 1960s, anti-war musicals flourished with the arrival of rock musicals, guerrilla theatre, happenings, and all the other experiments of the late 1960s and early 1970s. Most of these musicals were stronger in content and conviction than in craftsmanship and were usually presented Off Broadway or Off Off Broadway. Yet there were notable exceptions in all three venues. Hair ( 1968 ) unabashedly attacked the Vietnam War and the military along with its other establishment targets Off...

Stage Door Canteen

Stage Door Canteen   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to American Theatre (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
119 words

...World War II to entertain soldiers free of charge. It was founded by the American Theatre Wing and the USO (United Service Organization). The first and principal one was established in the basement of the 44th Street Theatre. Broadway performers and others passing through New York offered their services gratis, not merely entertaining but often serving as waiters and dishwashers. Irving Berlin saluted it in his all‐soldier show, This Is the Army ( 1942 ), with the song “I Left My Heart at the Stage Door Canteen.” Similar, smaller establishments were...

Whittaker, Herbert

Whittaker, Herbert   Reference library

Denis Johnston

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
103 words

...Trained in design, he began reviewing for the Gazette in his native Montréal , and from 1949 to 1975 was lead critic at Toronto 's Globe and Mail , ‘Canada's national newspaper’. Whittaker's encouragement of new professional ventures was vital to the establishment and growth of Canada's post-war theatre. He also continued as a theatre practitioner: in 1951 he was named best director at the Dominion Drama Festival, and in 1961 designed a celebrated ‘Eskimo’ King Lear for the touring Canadian Players. Critical collections and memoirs by Whittaker...

Cabaret

Cabaret   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Companion to the Theatre (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
139 words

...however, it began in 1881 with the establishment of Le Chat Noir in Paris, where artists, poets, and musicians presented their work. Its many imitators toured widely and were influential on the Continent, particularly in Germany and Russia, where in 1908 Balieff produced The Bat, later to become famous in Paris as Le Chauve-Souris. In Germany cabaret developed a political content after the First World War, especially in Berlin, reaching a peak in the 1930s and being banned by the Nazis in 1935 . No post-war cabaret has achieved comparable political...

Basic Training of Pavlo Hummel, The

Basic Training of Pavlo Hummel, The (1971)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to American Theatre (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
200 words

...he is undeterred. His sergeant, Tower ( Joe Fields ), represents the military establishment, which turns him into a benumbed orderly, while Ardell ( Albert Hall ), acting as an involved Greek chorus, comforts him and explains the often‐baffling world to him. At the end of the play his coffin sits alone on the stage. Hailed by Clive Barnes of the Times as introducing “a new and authentic voice to our theatre,” the Joe Papp production was the first in Rabe's trilogy on the war, the other plays being Sticks and Bones and Streamers . It employed the...

Altman, Robert

Altman, Robert (1925–2006)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the American Musical

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Performing arts, Music
Length:
142 words

...Robert [ Bernard ] ( 1925–2006 ). Film and stage director . An anti-establishment auteur with a distinctive style, he directed three musicals during his long and impressive career. Altman was born in Kansas City, Missouri, served as a bomber in World War II, and then studied engineering at the University of Missouri before turning to writing film scripts. He directed independent films and several television series before finding fame in Hollywood with M*A*S*H ( 1970 ). Like his subsequent efforts, it was quirky, satiric, and multilayered with...

Okhlopkov, Nikolai

Okhlopkov, Nikolai   Reference library

The Companion to Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
181 words

...acquired the leadership of the Realistic Theatre in 1932 where he sought to implement his idea of a communal theatre. Reconfiguring actor– *audience relationships so as to encourage emotional involvement, Okhlopkov staged plays on revolutionary and Civil War themes. Ironically the establishment rewarded him by merging his theatre with *Tairov 's—the theatrical equivalent of chalk with cheese. Following film appearances, which included *Eisenstein 's Aleksandr Nevsky , Okhlopkov's career resumed its course when he took over the Mayakovsky Theatre,...

Rolland, Romain

Rolland, Romain   Reference library

C. Henrik Borgstrom

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
168 words

...Romain ( 1866–1944 ) French novelist, essayist, and playwright, considered one of the most influential populist intellectuals in France between the two wars. In an age of fervent nationalism, Rolland placed his faith in pacifism and communism, and railed against the elitism of the artistic establishment. With his 1903 essay Le Théâtre du peuple ( Theatre of the People ), he emerged as one of the first vocal proponents of the ‘théâtre populaire’. His major work for the stage was the monumental Théâtre de la Révolution , comprising eight separate...

Berkoff, Steven

Berkoff, Steven   Reference library

R. Valerie Lucas

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
260 words

... ( 1980 ), savage critiques of the class system in Decadence ( 1981 ) and of the Falklands War in the Sink the Belgrano ( 1987 ), and the lyrical The Secret Love Life of Ophelia ( 2001 ). A theatrical iconoclast, Berkoff remains critical of the British theatrical establishment, despite directing Salome ( 1988 ) and The Trial ( 1991 ) at the Royal National Theatre . Stints as Hollywood villains and (ironically) as Hitler in the television epic War and Remembrance ( 1986 ) bankrolled his own theatre productions, enabling him to retain artistic...

Littlewood, Joan

Littlewood, Joan   Reference library

The Companion to Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
183 words

...Joan ( 1914–2002 ) With Theatre of Action, Theatre Union, and finally *Theatre Workshop (London, from 1953 ), Littlewood became famous for her anti-establishment, risk-taking, collaborative theatre. Her developmental approach, called ‘work-shopping’, was applied to the classics and living authors alike. Some distressed dramatists found their plays work-shopped beyond recognition, but the scripts of *Behan and *Delaney , among others, were successfully produced by this method. Littlewood was always opposed to the *bourgeois theatre of ...

Browne, Maurice

Browne, Maurice (1881–1955)   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Companion to the Theatre (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
189 words

...where he is credited with having founded the Little Theatre movement ( see AMATEUR THEATRE ) by the establishment in 1912 of the Chicago Little Theatre, which he directed for several years. In 1920 he was directing on Broadway, and in 1927 he made his first appearance in London, as Adolf in Strindberg 's The Creditors . In 1929 he took over the management of the Savoy Theatre and presented there with remarkable success R. C. Sherriff 's war play Journey's End , himself playing Lieutenant Raleigh. In the following year he produced Othello ...

Liebler, Theodore

Liebler, Theodore (1852–1941)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to American Theatre (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
209 words

...Theodore ( 1852–1941 ), producer . Born in New York, shortly after his father was forced to flee Germany for partaking in an insurrection, he began working as a commercial artist, and before long he had a modestly successful lithograph firm in Park Place. When his establishment was destroyed by fire, George Tyler persuaded him to join forces to produce The Royal Box ( 1897 ). The play was a success, inaugurating the long career of Liebler and Company. Among its memorable productions were The Christian ( 1898 ), The Children of the Ghetto (...

Pendleton, Austin

Pendleton, Austin (1940– )   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the American Musical

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Performing arts, Music
Length:
230 words

...by such musical performances as the anti-establishment poet Isaac in The Last Sweet Days of Isaac ( 1970 ), the suicidal Harry Berlin in What About Luv? ( 1991 ), and a replacement for the dying clerk Otto in Grand Hotel ( 1991 ). Even as Pendleton acted in many nonmusicals on and Off Broadway, he started directing in regional theatre and then New York, helming such notable plays as the Elizabeth Taylor revival of The Little Foxes ( 1981 ) and the dramas The Runner Stumbles ( 1976 ) and Spoils of War ( 1988 ), as well as the Broadway musical ...

Biramangol, Mayanglambam

Biramangol, Mayanglambam (1908–79)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Indian Theatre

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
360 words

...1908–79 ): founder-member of *Aryan Theatre , Manipur. He was a unique product of the dichotomy between Sanskritic acculturation and the indigenous Meitei religion, and also a sympathizer of the Communist Party after World War II. The leading figure in post-War *Manipuri theatre , he spent all his earnings from contract work during the War in the cause of theatre, without financial returns to his family. He wrote more than thirty plays after studying ancient Manipuri texts, and developed the issue of the contention or struggle between Hinduism and Meitei...

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