You are looking at 1-10 of 10 entries  for:

  • All: war establishment x
  • Local and Family History x
clear all

View:

Overview

war establishment

The level of equipment and manning laid down for a military unit in wartime.

Central Government, Courts, and Taxation

Central Government, Courts, and Taxation   Quick reference

R. W. Hoyle

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
7,753 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...waned when the immediate social problems disappeared and government turned its attention to more pressing matters. After the Civil War even this limited activism ceased. The majority of the government's employees were concerned with the collection of revenue as customs officials , rent collectors, or excise men. For the early modern period, it is impossible to produce accurate figures of how large the central establishment was, for much government work was carried out not by its own salaried officers but by clerks and deputies employed by them, and paid...

Agricultural History

Agricultural History   Quick reference

David Hey

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
4,344 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...had attempted national surveys. The opening of county record offices in many parts of England, making accessible much new archival material, encouraged the local and regional approach which has been so important since the Second World War. The expansion of the national higher education system and in particular the establishment of university departments of economic history brought many new scholars into the field. By 1953 there were sufficient of these to launch the British Agricultural History Society and its journal, the Agricultural History Review ,...

Local and Regional History: Modern Approaches

Local and Regional History: Modern Approaches   Quick reference

David Hey

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
4,365 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...Kent and the Great Rebellion, 1640–60 ( 1966 ), have proved particularly rewarding in reinterpreting the period of the Civil War and Commonwealth . Localized research has challenged the ways in which national history has been viewed. The county format was also used by the Hodder and Stoughton series of landscape histories, under Hoskins's editorship. A purely practical reason for favouring the county unit was the establishment of county record offices ; the bulk of the archives, outside those of the major national collections, are housed together,...

Local Government

Local Government   Quick reference

R. W. Hoyle

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,202 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...and Welsh counties the JPs apparently preferred to allow begging rather than court unpopularity by demanding that rates be levied. A mixture of magisterial pressure and the need for parishes to cope with the dearth years of 1630–1 and 1647–50 made for the near‐universal establishment of parish relief by 1660 . From this date, the duty of supervising the Poor Law in the parishes must have taken over a large part of an active magistrate's time. But the Old Poor Law was essentially a system of parish relief, operated by overseers whose policy in the parish...

Place-Names

Place-Names   Quick reference

Margaret Gelling

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,757 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...names, such as Welsh and Cornish formations with tref and tre , are of post‐Roman date. Some are certainly medieval, because (as with Irish Bally‐ and Manx Balla‐ names) they have post‐Norman Conquest personal or family names as qualifiers. In Celtic‐speaking countries the establishment of distinctions between the earliest names and those of medieval origin is a fraught exercise which impinges on feelings about ethnic identity. Manx people, for instance, do not like to be told that many of their Gaelic names date from after rather than before the Viking...

Towns

Towns   Quick reference

David M. Palliser

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,140 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...and it is true that the state in 1688 restored the old pattern of chartered and unchartered towns in all their variety, and that no major changes were made until the 19th century. However, piecemeal improvements under Acts of Parliament were numerous, especially in the establishment of improvement commissions from 1725 ; these enjoyed wide powers to raise money and to provide services, and in consequence corporate towns acquired a valuable supplementary authority, while unincorporated towns acquired a vital means of self‐government. As a result,...

Education

Education   Quick reference

David Hey

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
4,295 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...Acts of 1833 and 1842 ) in order to provide two hours of schooling six days a week for their child workers aged 9 to 13. The numerous private schools were often ephemeral, many of them dismissed contemptuously as ‘dame schools’, for they were little more than childminding establishments, though the more successful ones were listed as ‘private academies’ in trade and commercial directories . The emergence of a sizeable middle class created a demand for superior private schools, especially for girls. The Churches were active in promoting both day proprietary...

Scottish Local and Family History

Scottish Local and Family History   Quick reference

David moody

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,622 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...Kenefick , Red Scotland: The Rise and Fall of the Radical Left, c.1872 to 1932 ( 2007 ). The extent of prescriptive or polemical writing reflects the lack of a common ground among the Scots (taught English history as their own until recently), the lack of a large academic establishment, and maybe the combative spirit of the Scots. Given this situation, most of the older amateur local histories in the antiquarian tradition, by an assortment of ministers, middle‐class professionals, and the self‐educated, would hardly be worth rescuing from a conflagration,...

Irish Local and Family History

Irish Local and Family History   Quick reference

Kevin Whelan

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
4,945 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...values as the basis for the construction of a distinctive Irish identity in the modern world. Therefore, within this colonial context, the Irish past never entered totally into history, because it never passed fully out of politics. This quickening of interest encouraged the establishment of libraries, the publication of source materials (especially in translation), and the detailed mapping, recording, and collection of antiquities. By the 1870s a national museum, a national library, and a record office had all been established, and Ireland also possessed a...

dissolution of the monasteries

dissolution of the monasteries   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
671 words

...of the monasteries By the beginning of the 16th century the number of monks and nuns was far lower than it had been 200 years previously. Many monasteries and convents, especially the smaller establishments, had insufficient numbers to run efficiently. Conditions and standards varied widely from monastery to monastery, though they were never as lax as the propagandists for dissolution made out. Confessions of sinful conduct and incompetent management, which were made at the time of surrender, should not be taken at face value. The Valor...

View: