You are looking at 1-20 of 86 entries  for:

  • All: type batter x
  • Cookery, Food, and Drink x
clear all

View:

Overview

type batter

Damage or wear to type, resulting in a defective impression. Because each battered type creates a unique impression, Hinman, Blayney, and others have successfully used evidence from ...

fritto misto

fritto misto   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

...misto Italian ; small thin pieces of a variety of types of meat, fish, or vegetables, coated with egg and breadcrumbs or batter, and deep...

kadaif

kadaif   Quick reference

The Diner’s Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...wheat . It is an eastern Mediterranean confection made from a leavened flour-and-water batter sieved into very thin strands which are rolled round a filling of chopped nuts, baked, and then soaked in syrup. Kadaif, or kadayif, is its Turkish name. In Greece it is kataifi. Both come from Arabic qata’if, which refers to a type of pancake. In Arab countries, particularly Egypt and Syria, the vermicelli-pastry confection, which is made from the same batter as kadaif, is known as kunafa...

shortening bread

shortening bread   Quick reference

The Diner’s Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...bread A type of American bread made by frying a batter mixture containing cornmeal, eggs, milk, and some sort of fat, such as butter. A speciality of the southern states, it achieved wider fame thanks to a line in a traditional plantation song that runs ‘Mammy’s little baby loves short’nin’...

hopper

hopper   Quick reference

The Diner’s Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...A type of saucer-shaped pancake characteristic of southern India and Sri Lanka. Its yeast batter , made from rice flour, is cooked in a bowl-shaped pan, which gives the hopper its particular form: thick in the middle, thin and lacy towards the edge. Often a whole egg is cooked in the centre. Its name in Tamil is appam (probably a descendant of Sanskrit apupa ‘fried delicacy’), and a variant form of this, appa, was folk-etymologically transformed in Anglo-Indian English into hopper. See also string hopper...

fraise

fraise   Quick reference

The Diner’s Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...A type of thick pancake typically incorporating pieces of bacon . Conceptually it is perhaps closer to an omelette , but made with batter rather than beaten eggs and butter. It is now largely a thing of the past, although sweet versions containing fruit survived into the twentieth century: Florence White in her Good Things in England ( 1932 ), quotes a recipe for an ‘apple fraize’. The term, which also occurs in the form froise, dates back to the early fourteenth century. It probably came from an unrecorded Old French * freis or * freise, which...

Chemical Leavening

Chemical Leavening   Reference library

Sandra L. Oliver

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...of chemicals known to work as leavening agents resulted in the most common and popular modern types. Along the way, there was much controversy and confusion about the dangers of using the agents and charges and countercharges of ingredient adulteration. Chemical leavenings replaced yeast and beaten egg whites. A blending of acid and alkali creates the gas required to raise batter or dough, usually accomplished by introducing an alkali to acid ingredients in the batter or by adding both an acid and an alkali to the ingredients. Since basic principles of...

Crepes

Crepes   Reference library

Lauren Bloomberg

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...usually folded into triangles and wrapped in wax paper so that they can be eaten while one walks or without much excessive mess. In order to prepare crepes a batter must be made and left to sit. Then, by French practice, a bit is poured into a small crepe pan. The cook then quickly picks the pan off of the heating source and swirls the batter to lightly coat the pan. It takes mere minutes for the batter to form the pancake before it must be flipped out of the pan. Butter is most commonly used as a lubricant to prevent the crepe from sticking. The Crepe Suzette...

Sally Lunn

Sally Lunn   Reference library

Virginia Scott Jenkins

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...with baking powder. Still other variants include cornmeal, sour cream, or buttermilk. It can be baked in a shallow cake pan, a ring mold, a Turk's head mold, a bread pan, a bundt or tube pan, or even in muffin tins. One recipe makes a very light corn bread, baked as a dropped batter on a baking sheet. Whatever the form, Sally Lunn is generally cut into wedges, slices, or squares and served hot with butter and jam. It is a favorite Virginia hot bread and is claimed by Colonial Williamsburg , where visitors can dine on Sally Lunn in the museum's taverns and...

Puddings

Puddings   Reference library

Joseph M. Carlin

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...both British and American cookery, there was little attempt to provide stabilization or codification of this class of food. In an attempt to bring some semblance of order, Mrs. Whitney broke down puddings into four general divisions: puddings with crusts, soft-mixed puddings, batter puddings, and sandwich puddings. Puddings with crusts include apple dumplings (boiled, steamed, or baked), Huckleberry hollow and pandowdy, which are deep-dish desserts. Soft-mixed puddings include boiled or baked bread pudding, Indian pudding, and plum pudding and baked rice,...

Cake

Cake   Reference library

Stephen Schmidt, Stephen Schmidt, Kim Pierce, Andrew F. Smith, Stephen Schmidt, Cathy K. Kaufman, Jennifer C. Keegan, Cathy K. Kaufman, and Sally Parham

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...making these cheaper, quicker-baking pound-type cakes for teas. Raisins and spices had always been typical in these cakes, and to make their company tea cakes seem special, women added these enhancements with a liberal hand. And to make their cakes lighter and moister, American women made the fateful decision to add pearl ash and milk to the batter, which compensated for the tenderness and moisture supplied to true pound cake by a full complement of butter and eggs. America almost certainly learned of pearl ash, a type of baking soda refined from wood ashes,...

Yeast

Yeast   Reference library

William Rubel

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...yeast, often had at least a hint of flavor from hops. Until the late nineteenth century American bread bakers often made bread in a two-step process. They Yeast.  Advertisement for Fleischman's yeast. Collection of Andrew F. Smith multiplied their yeast by adding it to a batter of flour and water. When this “sponge” had risen, which took some hours, they added the remaining ingredients, which then fermented for several more hours. Bread dough sometimes was started the afternoon or evening before the actual baking day. Long rising gives yeast a chance to...

Breakfast Foods

Breakfast Foods   Reference library

Sylvia Lovegren

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...frequently used to make them up, as were bread crumbs that had been soaked overnight in buttermilk. An interesting recipe for snow pancakes was fairly familiar in northern climates—freshly fallen snow took the place of eggs in the batter, using the air trapped in the snow crystals to leaven the dough. Snow fritters, deep-fried batter made with snow, were also enjoyed, as were fritters made with everything from apples to tomatoes to corn to oysters. Some cooks served sweet fritters dusted with powdered sugar, while others passed syrup or molasses and butter. To...

Chesapeake Bay Region

Chesapeake Bay Region   Reference library

Virginia Scott Jenkins

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...fried chicken (served with cream gravy) may have had its origins in Africa. Sweet potato biscuits are in the Indian tradition of bread made from sweet potatoes, chestnuts, beans, and corn. Peanuts, black-eyed peas, okra, and watermelon came from Africa. Corn pudding, spoon bread (batter bread in Virginia), unsweetened white corn bread, hominy, grits, and sweet potato and pumpkin pies are all adaptations using local ingredients. (White potato pie is found on the Eastern Shore.) Brunswick stew (made with squirrel and onions) originated in Brunswick County,...

Globalization of American Food

Globalization of American Food   Reference library

Walter Carroll

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...complete and dogs with all. Not surprisingly these come with pretty much everything on them. In Denmark and Norway, they are served with bacon and cheese. In South Korea, street vendors offer numerous kinds of hot dogs, some coated with sugar, while in Seoul one can buy a batter-dipped hot dog that may be wrapped in bacon. There are recognizable hot dog brands, such as Nathan's in the United States, but hot dog chains differ from those for hamburgers in that there are no iconic global brands such as McDonald's. Nonetheless, American hot dogs clearly make...

Indian American Food

Indian American Food   Reference library

Krishnendu Ray and Colleen Taylor Sen

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...love to snack, and an afternoon tea or tiffin featuring salty savories and sweets is part of daily life. Over the past decade, sweet and snack shops have opened in major Indian shopping districts. Typical offerings include pakoras (vegetables deep fried in a chickpea flour batter), samosas (baked or fried pastries filled with meat or vegetables), bhelpuri , and dozens of varieties of savory snacks and sweets, usually from North India or Gujarat. In New York City, popular food carts sell biryani , kabobs, and other Indian dishes. With a few exceptions,...

Historical Overview

Historical Overview   Reference library

Andrew F. Smith, John U. Rees, Rachelle E. Friedman, John U. Rees, Alison Tozzi, Kara Newman, Anne Mendelson, Amy Bentley, Sylvia Lovegren, and Sylvia Lovegren

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...popular item was the baked potato—often wrapped in foil and cooked on the side of the grill—topped off in the new California style with sour cream and chives. Women were also likely to contribute to the feast by frying chicken or corn dogs (frankfurters fried in a cornmeal batter and served on a stick) in the new portable electric skillet, introduced by Presto in 1953 . Kebabs, or skewer cookery, on the barbecue was also a passion of the age. The noted New York Times writer Craig Claiborne said that the “shish kebab craze was second only to the...

Cookbooks

Cookbooks   Reference library

Janice Bluestein Longone, Janice Bluestein Longone, Anne Mendelson, Becky Mercuri, Carol Mighton Haddix, Alice Ross, Anne L. Bower, Andrew F. Smith, Margaret Puskar-Pasewicz, and Virginia K. Bartlett

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...recipes from iPads or Kindles as newer generations of cooks do. However, industry experts predict print cookbooks will not disappear anytime soon. There still will be glossy pages to protect from stains or crumbs, favorite recipes marked by folded-down page corners, and those battered, but coveted, books to hand down, mother to child. [ See also Barbecue ; Bayless, Rick ; Beard, James ; Cajun and Creole Food ; Celebrity Chefs ; Child, Julia ; Claiborne, Craig ; Farmers’ Markets ; Franey, Pierre ; French Influences on American Food ; Fusion Food ; ...

baseball and softball

baseball and softball   Quick reference

Food and Fitness: A Dictionary of Diet and Exercise (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

...of the hips, shoulders, arms, and wrists. These movements put a lot of strain on the neck, shoulders, and upper back. Batters therefore require good upper body strength and flexibility. Fielding requires good all-round fitness: fielders have to be able to run quickly and catch a ball (usually with the non-dominant gloved hand) and then throw it accurately. All baseball players have to throw the ball at one time or another, but it is the major function of pitchers. By coordinating the movements of all the muscles of the upper body, a pitcher can release the ball...

batter

batter   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Food (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

...whilst retaining flavour and juices. Wherever deep-frying is an important cooking method, something similar to batter will have evolved, although the ingredients may differ substantially from those used in Europe. Japanese tempura recipes call for various combinations of flour, egg (or egg yolk alone), and water; Chinese deep-fried recipes for wheat flour, cornflour, and water; and the Indian pakora , a type of vegetable fritter, uses a batter of chickpea flour and water. Among professionals, the word describes any paste of flour and liquid, for example, a...

fritter

fritter   Reference library

Laura Mason

The Oxford Companion to Food (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

...of fritter introduced in the 18th century were of flavoured ground rice; a thin type in the shape of a true lover’s knot (as in a pretzel) was piped with a forcing bag. This shape survives in the old French bugne and the American cruller . A few types of fritter from around the world are described below, merely to exemplify the ubiquity and variety of forms which this item displays. Apple and banana fritters , a popular dessert in Chinese restaurants in the West. A light batter containing whisked egg whites is used to encase the prepared fruit, and the...

View: