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type batter

Damage or wear to type, resulting in a defective impression. Because each battered type creates a unique impression, Hinman, Blayney, and others have successfully used evidence from ...

type batter

type batter  

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Overview Page
Damage or wear to type, resulting in a defective impression. Because each battered type creates a unique impression, Hinman, Blayney, and others have successfully used evidence from damaged types to ...
Painting

Painting   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,778 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...While Alison's theories offered one avenue of interpretation and justification for pictures like Flatford Mill , the *picturesque theory of writers such as William *Gilpin and Uvedale *Price gave objects like Constable's gnarled tree, clump of plants, twisting brook, and battered stump an independent aesthetic value as signs of an unspoilt, weathered, and ‘natural’ British landscape endearingly resistant to the claims of modernity. Gilpin 's Three Essays: On Picturesque Beauty; On Picturesque Travel; and of Sketching Landscape ( 1792 ), suggested that...

Osborne, John

Osborne, John   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of British Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature
Length:
3,144 words

...and the second as a series of tableaux representing Luther's internal struggles. Inadmissible Evidence ( 1964 ), however, represents Osborne at his most ambitious, experimental, and lengthy (three hours), proving that he was capable of writing plays about characters more battered by than angry at life. Beginning with a dream sequence that then blurs with the real-world action that follows, the play charts the self-indictment and eventual mental breakdown of a solicitor, Bill Maitland, who defends himself in a case that manifests and convicts Maitland's...

Woolf, Virginia

Woolf, Virginia   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of British Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature
Length:
8,513 words
Illustration(s):
1

...Reader , p. 154). Nonetheless, a sense of “the alien” pervades Woolf's work. Many of her protagonists are misfits who embody the uncircumscribed spirit she sought to harness into words. Cameo appearances by figures on the fringe are often centers of enduring value: like the “battered woman” in rags outside the Regent Park Tube station in Mrs. Dalloway , who “stood singing of love,” her voice as rusty as a pump, her syllables mere nonsense sounds (p. 80); or the lurching and leering figure of old Mrs. McNab in To the Lighthouse , the cleaning woman who...

Cambridge

Cambridge   Reference library

The Oxford Guide to Literary Britain & Ireland (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature, Society and culture
Length:
8,577 words

...were meant not just to lull but to disarm: nobody who had once lived in these emollient surroundings would ever again feel sufficiently alienated from society to be anything more troublesome than a reformist. Gradualism was implicit in every carefully repainted coat of arms and battered refectory table … Peterhouse ( 1281 ), the oldest college. John Skelton is thought to have been attached to Peterhouse. He graduated MA in 1484 and in 1493 became ‘poet laureate’, at that time a title given to an outstanding student. He is also known to have been at...

Glück, Louise

Glück, Louise   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
2,185 words

...belief.” At times she echoes C. S. Lewis 's explanation of suffering as God's gift to man with her own questions, as in Vespers , one of the ten poems, where she asks, is pain your gift to make me conscious in my need of you. She also echoes the passion of John Donne 's line “Batter my heart” with her own “What is my heart to you that you must break it over and over.” In an angrier tone, the poet asks in Vespers , In what contempt do you hold us to believe only loss can impress your power on us. At any rate, this collection is so raw emotionally, so direct...

Mather, Cotton

Mather, Cotton   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
2,700 words

...manifest in his diaries, his inner life was dominated by a Puritan bent toward self-awareness that resulted in a deep uneasiness about himself and his work. This constant sense of insecurity made him prone to sharp criticism of others. His periods of doubt prompted tireless and battering exercises of self-examination conducted in an attempt to determine that which Puritanism declared undeterminable: was he among the elect destined for salvation? On a weekly basis Mather would devote entire days to “secret prayer,” examining and reviewing in detail the depth of...

Dreiser, Theodore

Dreiser, Theodore   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
7,919 words

...about the new leader became clear. He corresponded about the matter with Mencken , as he had during World War I. The two old friends were renewing their acquaintance after a ten-year estrangement following the publication of An American Tragedy . Mencken had given the book a battering review in his American Mercury , the culmination of his building unhappiness with the direction in which Dreiser's fiction had gone since the publication of Sister Carrie and Jennie Gerhardt . Dreiser had grown up almost dirt poor, while Mencken had been raised as the...

Steinbeck, John

Steinbeck, John   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
8,619 words

...delves more deeply into the origin and nature of evil than in any previous work. The novel's main story revolves around Adam Trask, who as a boy is nearly killed in a Cain and Abel–like quarrel by his brother Charles. Adam eventually leaves home and becomes involved with a battered young woman, Cathy Ames, who has just murdered her parents and fled her pimp, Mr. Edwards. Steinbeck's view of Cathy, later known as Kate, evolves as the novel progresses, a fluctuation for which many critics fault him as inconsistent. At first he posits her as a moral monster,...

Whitman, Walt

Whitman, Walt   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
10,740 words

...in the New Hampshire winter). But he was apparently unhappy himself, at least about the generally harsh treatment of his poetry in America. In Prayer of Columbus , first published in Harper's in 1874 , he compared himself to the neglected Columbus at the end of his life, “A batter'd wreck'd old man, / Thrown on this savage shore, far, far from home.” His fear of public indifference (fueled by an American literary establishment contemptuous of his free verse and perhaps envious of his freer choice of subjects) led him in 1876 to trigger an Anglo-American...

The Long Poem

The Long Poem   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
16,897 words

...to us in a series of wide-ranging monologues on art, race, and many other subjects. Several leftist poets of the 1930s also adapted Masters's methods. Horace Gregory 's Chelsea Rooming House uses both descriptive poems and dramatic monologues to sketch the impoverished and battered but resilient residents of a New York rooming house in the 1930s. In Pittsburgh Memoranda ( 1935 ), Haniel Long sets out to give a full portrait of his city, composed in the voices of its citizens, some famous ( Stephen Foster , Henry George , George Westinghouse ), some not...

Batter

Batter   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Irish Phrase & Fable

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

... . To perform a sean-nós dance, a type of step-dance found in parts of Connemara, also called a battráil in Irish, a borrowing from the English term. Traditionally only men danced the heavy ‘battering’ dances, women confining themselves to reels and the lighter...

Walmsley, Tom

Walmsley, Tom (b.1948)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Canadian Literature (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature
Length:
432 words

...responses are pity and fear. In White boys the playwright presents his familiar character types within the framework of farce. The full-length play works well at the level of a revue skit; but the idiom obstructs the necessary development of the theme, which is, once again, infantile impulse baffled by the demands of adult experience. Getting wrecked is a musical treatment of the theme of teenage abuse of alcohol, and Mr. Nice Guy treats the theme of wife battering. The most serious limitation of Walmsley's theatre is its narrow focus. The characters and...

Left

Left 1   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...baseball, the part of the playing area to the left of the batter, beyond third base, which rarely sees any action and from which the ball rarely arrives. Hence, metaphorically, something that is ‘out of left field’ is out of the ordinary, unexpected, eccentric, unorthodox or experimental. Left-footer A derogatory term, first recorded in the 1930s, for a roman catholic . It probably simply draws on the generally negative connotations of ‘left’, although it has been speculated that it alludes to a type of turf-cutting spade, as used by Irish Catholics, which is...

Hush puppy

Hush puppy   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Modern Phrase & Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

...puppy . An American aliment of deep-fried corn meal batter, often served with fried fish in the Southern states. Pieces thrown to hungry barking dogs with the injunction ‘Hush, Puppy!’ were said to effect an instant silence. ‘Hush Puppies’ became familiar in the 1960s as the trade name of a type of soft shoe. The allusion is to shoes that comfort ‘barking dogs’, slang for tired or sore...

landscape

landscape   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Hardy

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
2,348 words

...recognizes the contrast from the chalk downland in the tread and smell of the soil. Her consciousness becomes alert to half-remembered folk-memories that generate a potent atmosphere of nameless fears, the same fears that made her mother insist that the magical properties of her battered copy of The Compleat Fortune-Teller were such that the book must not remain in the cottage overnight, but must be hidden in the thatch of the outhouse ( TDU 3). The Valley of the Great Dairies is first presented in terms of the contrasts its landscape offers to the Blackmore...

Hebrew

Hebrew   Reference library

The Oxford Guide to Literature in English Translation

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature
Length:
5,350 words

...Mass of metal, my flesh between them awaits the fire. Above looms my God the blacksmith, hammering terribly. Each wound carved in me by Time splits into a fissure, Sparking out inward fire in flashes of memory. My fate controls me, till day has sunk in the west. When this battered mass, thrown back on the bed, lies still, With a gaping wound for a mouth, which none has dressed, Naked I say to my God: Thou hast wrought Thy will. Now it is night: of Thy goodness, let us rest. Among the poets of the succeeding generation are several who are highly esteemed...

Scenes of Clerical Life

Scenes of Clerical Life   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to George Eliot

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
4,898 words

...with the aid of his anxious-to-please wife, the public humiliation of Edgar Tryan over his Sunday evening lectures. By a superb structural effect, however, it is Dempster who is later to be publicly humiliated by his violence and drunkenness, while Tryan survives the battering satirical shafts (some of which are Janet's) and the threats of physical violence with the courage of principle and faith. And to compound the contrast, Janet comes through her terrible domestic ordeals and finds a new life which is made possible for her by the practice and...

Drama in English. The beginnings to 1953

Drama in English. The beginnings to 1953   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Canadian Literature (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature
Length:
9,133 words

...Theatre with a successful production of Creeps ( 1972 )—set in the washroom of a sheltered workshop for the cerebral palsied—which is a lacerating comedy revealing the metaphorical ‘lower depths’ that trap the physically or psychologically handicapped. His next play, Battering ram ( 1972 ), showed the multi-levelled interdependence among a crippled youth, a young woman, and her mother; but his third play, You're gonna be alright, Jamie Boy ( 1974 ), rarely rose above a tv sitcom level. David French entered the 1970s with as much force as...

Drama in French. The beginnings to 1900

Drama in French. The beginnings to 1900   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Canadian Literature (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature
Length:
17,432 words

...French by Noëlle Renaude —is a dysfunctional family, suffering as the result of a mother's abandonment. Bouchard won a Governor General's Award for a children's play with universal appeal: L'histoire de l'oie ( 1991 ). It is a moving, intimate, subtle, and dark drama about a battered child who is able, as an adult, to analyse and help the audience visualize, through the aid of a puppet, how brutality is transmitted from one generation to another. It was translated into English by Linda Gaboriau as The tale of Teeka ( 1992 ). The third dramatist to make an...

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