You are looking at 1-4 of 4 entries  for:

  • All: traditio Legis x
  • Classical studies x
clear all

View:

Overview

traditio Legis

Also ‘Dominus legem dat’. The early Christian iconographic motif of Christ, standing or enthroned, distributing his New Law in the form of a scroll (or rarely a codex) to the apostles ...

sarcophagus

sarcophagus  

A stone coffin, typically adorned with a sculpture or inscription and associated with the ancient civilizations of Egypt, Rome, and Greece. Recorded from late Middle English, the word comes via Latin ...
Christian Art

Christian Art   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
6,976 words
Illustration(s):
2

...to the Jordan as a passage to Paradise. Saint Peter's apse, probably completed by Constantine's son Constans I, was destroyed in the sixteenth century, but ancient drawings show Christ handing a scroll of the law to Peter and Paul—a composition often referred to as the traditio legis . Usually depicting the ascended Jesus regally enthroned or standing on an outcropping of rock from which the four rivers spring, this image had special significance in Rome, the site of both apostles’ martyrdom and burial. This image became widespread elsewhere and was a...

sarcophagus

sarcophagus   Reference library

Ulrich Gehn

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...from imperial iconography: Christ is shown frontally in the centre, standing on a mound, or enthroned in a circle of apostles. The apostles display courtly gestures ( acclamation , veiled hands , kneeling, offerings of palm twigs and wreaths). A common motif is that of the Traditio Legis (handing down of the law), where S. Peter is shown receiving a scroll. The *Cross , carried by S. Peter or replacing the person of Christ, is decorated with inlay and precious stones , and as a crux gemmata is a symbol of triumph and victory . Non-Christian imagery is...

Rome, churches of

Rome, churches of   Reference library

William Tronzo, David Natal, Jordan Pickett, Lucy Grig, William Tronzo, Lucy Grig, Lucy Grig, Lucy Grig, Caroline Goodson, Lucy Grig, Oliver Nicholson, Lucy Grig, William Tronzo, Lucy Grig, Caroline Goodson, Caroline Goodson, Lucy Grig, Lucy Grig, Lucy Grig, Lucy Grig, Lucy Grig, Lucy Grig, Lucy Grig, Lucy Grig, and William Tronzo

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...effort to outfit the church with a figural decorative programme was probably carried into effect in stages in the 4th and 5th centuries , and continued with additions throughout the Middle Ages. The apse contained a monumental figure of Christ with Ss. Peter and Paul, the Traditio Legis , and the nave had an Old Testament cycle on the right wall (north) and a New Testament cycle on the left wall (south). The nave also accommodated the graves of pious Christians who wanted to be buried in proximity to the saint ( ad sanctos ), including a Praefectus Urbi , ...

View: