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self-reflexive

Subject: Literature

A term applied to literary works that openly reflect upon their own processes of artful composition. Such self‐referentiality is frequently found in modern works of fiction that repeatedly ...

reflexivity

reflexivity   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Human Geography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Human Geography
Length:
208 words

...of the ethnographer are not independent of his/her participation. To be reflexive is to consider and self-critique how the assumptions, choices, and actions of one affects what is observed. For many, this also means declaring any issues raised through such a reflexive process in any dissemination of the research, so that readers can take account of how the project was situated . Further reading Mauthner, N. S and Doucet, A. (2003), ‘Reflexive accounts and accounts of reflexivity in qualitative data analysis’, Sociology 37:...

autoethnography

autoethnography   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Human Geography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Human Geography
Length:
93 words

...A form of ethnography that is highly self-referential wherein the researcher is partially the focus of analysis. Like ethnography , autoethnography involves participant observation and embedding within a community, however, the division between ethnographer and community is blurred with the researcher writing autobiographically about their experiences, ethnographically about their own culture and their place within it, or about their experiences of being the subject of an ethnographic project. It is a reflexive approach aimed at exposing the ...

self

self   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Human Geography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Human Geography
Length:
257 words

... The reflective and reflexive ability of human beings to take themselves as objects of their own thought. That is, a person being conscious of and understanding their own existence, and the ways in which they are distinguished from others. The notion of self is expressed through identity , character, abilities, and attitudes. The self is sometimes divided into ‘I’, which is the spontaneous essence of a person, and the ‘me’, how people see themselves through the eyes of others. The self evolves over time as a person develops and comes into contact with new...

individualization

individualization   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Human Geography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Human Geography
Length:
109 words

...characteristic of highly differentiated, democratic societies in which there is an intense focus on individual freedoms and rights. In these societies, it is argued that the individual is becoming the central unit of social life. Individuals are becoming increasingly reflexive and self-steered, rather than being shaped and structured by institutional regulation, and societal and collective norms. In other words, rather than living biographies largely scripted by traditional notions of family, work, gender, class, and so on, people are living more...

reflexivity

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A Dictionary of Geography (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... By a researcher, the habit of reflecting upon her/his own identity or standpoint in relation to her/his scholarship; self-transformation and self-examination in the pursuit of knowledge, and between the researcher and the phenomena studied; ‘reflexivity that aims, even if only ideally, at a full understanding of the researcher, the researched, and the research context’ ( Rose (1997) PHG 21, 3, 305...

regulation theory

regulation theory   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Geography (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... post-war period of capital expansion (which broke down in the early 1970s); and the current post-Fordist (or after-Fordist) capitalist period based on several suggested capitalist forms—flexible specialization, flexible accumulation, and reflexive accumulation. ‘Because capitalism is prone to destabilizing and self-generated crises, and because the system has nevertheless persisted, there must be some complex of economic, social, cultural, and political ‘‘regulation’’ that works to soothe, mute, and partially resolve the contradictions and crises of...

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