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Overview

self-reflexive

Subject: Literature

A term applied to literary works that openly reflect upon their own processes of artful composition. Such self‐referentiality is frequently found in modern works of fiction that repeatedly ...

reflexive

reflexive   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of English Grammar (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
207 words

...the reflexive is the direct object of the main clause or the subject of the subordinate clause. The former analysis is probably more common. 2. (A verb , or a structure containing a verb) taking a reflexive pronoun as direct object . English has very few verbs that require such an object. Some examples are: absent oneself, demean oneself (usually), perjure oneself, pride oneself Other verbs may be understood reflexively, but a reflexive pronoun as object is optional: He washed, shaved, and dressed • reflexivity : the property of being reflexive. • ...

myself

myself   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of American Usage and Style

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
157 words

...is best used either reflexively <I have decided to exclude myself from consideration> or intensively <I myself have seen instances of that type>. But myself shouldn't appear as a substitute for I or me . Using it that way is thought somehow to be modest, as if the reference were less direct. Yet it's no less direct, and the user may unconsciously cause the reader or listener to assume an intended jocularity, or that the user is somewhat doltish. E.g.: “The exclusion of women and women's concerns is self-defeating. For instance, myself and other women...

destruct

destruct   Quick reference

Fowler’s Concise Dictionary of Modern English Usage (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
211 words

...position (before another noun), as in destruct system . 2 The reflexive form self-destruct appeared in the late 1960s, in North America, and follows the same grammatical functions of destruct . Its figurative uses have developed on both sides of the Atlantic to such an extent that this is now by far the most common use of the word, occurring typically in sports reports (defeated teams, failing managers, and so on) and political commentary: His country’s presidency in the EU has self-destructed and yet we are expected to see him steer EU policy for the...

than

than   Reference library

Fowler’s Dictionary of Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
911 words

...long black hair and is thinner than I am; He was a few years older than I was; his attitude was kind and generous to those less endowed than he was. See also cases 3 ; me 2 ( d ). 7 Reflexive pronouns after than . One means of avoiding the problem of whether to use a nominative or an objective pronoun after than ( see 6 above) is to use a reflexive pronoun instead, but the result is often rather less than satisfactory. Examples: One of the most encouraging performances came from Darren Cook…against senior athletes with far more experience...

suicide

suicide   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
361 words

...Suicide,” New Criterion , Dec. 1991 , at 58, 59. Earlier synonyms, now less frequently employed, include self-destroyer , self-killer , self-murderer , self-slayer , and felo-de-se . C. As a Verb. The verb has been used intransitively <he suicided> , reflexively and redundantly <he suicided himself> , and transitively and ridiculously <he suicided her (i.e., drove her to suicide)> . In the intransitive and reflexive uses, the senses are self-evident. The most common use is the intransitive one—e.g.: • “He called his homeland the new Nazareth, and ...

oneself

oneself   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
268 words

...; ✳one's self . Oneself became the predominant spelling of the reflexive pronoun about 1900 . ✳One's self is an archaic variant that was already becoming old-fashioned when this passage was written: “The first and probably the most important one is production discipline, making one's self [read oneself ] write whether one feels like it or not. The second is revision discipline; the third, rejection-slip discipline.” Anne Hamilton , How to Revise Your Own Stories vii ( 1946 ). By the late 20th century, the two-word version had become distinctly...

myself

myself   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
285 words

...is best used either reflexively <I have decided to exclude myself from consideration> or intensively <I myself have seen that> <I’ve done that myself> . The word shouldn't appear as a substitute for I or me <my wife and myself were delighted to see you> . Using it that way, as an “untriggered reflexive,” is thought somehow to be modest, as if the reference were less direct. Yet it's no less direct, and the user may unconsciously cause the reader or listener to assume an intended jocularity, or that the user is somewhat doltish. E.g.: • “Those...

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