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self-reflexive

Subject: Literature

A term applied to literary works that openly reflect upon their own processes of artful composition. Such self‐referentiality is frequently found in modern works of fiction that repeatedly ...

Tricicle

Tricicle  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Catalan mime group formed in 1979 by Carles Sans, Joan Gracia, and Paco Mir. Initial productions were academic and self-reflexive in character, consisting largely of the reinterpretation of ...
Tricicle

Tricicle   Reference library

Keith Gregor

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
174 words

...Catalan mime group formed in 1979 by Carles Sans , Joan Gracia , and Paco Mir . Initial productions were academic and self-reflexive in character, consisting largely of the reinterpretation of techniques by masters such as Marcel Marceau . Gradually the group evolved a more subjective approach that incorporated gags, masks , gestures, and clowning. Their international reputation was assured with shows like Manicòmic ( 1982 ), Exit ( 1984 ), and Slàstic ( 1986 ). Terrífic ( 1992 ) was a manic and interactive spoof on the genre of the...

metatheatre

metatheatre   Reference library

The Companion to Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
555 words

...Self-reflexive drama or performance that reveals its artistic status to the *audience . The reflexivity may be embedded in a script's structure by the playwright, when it can be called metadrama, or superimposed in production by the *director or designer. In either instance, aesthetic self-consciousness is often presented in both artistic and metaphysical terms, especially in works that speculate on alternative versions of reality, including the artifice of representation. The play-within-the-play in Hamlet ( c. 1600 ) set the standard for the...

surrealism

surrealism   Reference library

The Companion to Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
366 words

...by Breton in 1924 , though Guillaume Apollinaire ( 1880–1918 ) had coined the term ‘surrealism’ in the preface to The Breasts of Teiresias (written 1903 , produced 1917 ). Apollinaire's text is deeply indebted to *Jarry 's Ubu roi ( 1896 ), following a comparable self-reflexive, *satiric , and imagistic style. A verse drama, the play's *characters and *action are liquid with sudden transformations of subjects and illogical shifts in plot. Typical surrealist *dramaturgy is exemplified in *Cocteau 's The Wedding on the Eiffel Tower ( 1921 ),...

Ontological Hysteric Theatre

Ontological Hysteric Theatre   Reference library

Matthew Causey

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
270 words

...of the text . Wires and strings are often stretched across the space to emphasize the construction of the theatrical space. Lighting and sound (flashes and alarms) are often used to interrupt the action and disarm the audience 's gaze so as to turn the performance, self-reflexively, toward the theatre's technologies of representation and the ideologies of power present in the representations. Performers are often untrained and acting consists of a presentational, non- realist style that, like the mise-en-scène , points towards its own form as...

illusion

illusion   Reference library

Meg Mumford

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
429 words

...illusionism as tools for preserving the bourgeois status quo ( see epic theatre ; bourgeois theatre ). Brecht argued that a focus on character-centred identification and linear plot encouraged a passive self-indulgent spectator with a fatalist outlook, one whose ability to reflect critically on social reality was inhibited. While his self-reflexive use of Verfremdung is sometimes described as anti-illusionist, to draw attention to the process of illusion making is itself an attempt to give the appearance of being true or real. Whenever makers of...

surrealism

surrealism   Reference library

Matthew Causey

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
504 words

..., which was written in 1903 and revised for production in 1917 . According to Apollinaire surrealism would bring a new and striking aesthetic to the theatre. The structure of Apollinaire's text is deeply indebted to Jarry 's Ubu roi ( 1896 ), following a comparable self-reflexive, satiric , and imagistic style. A verse drama, the play's characters and action are liquid with sudden transformations of subjects and illogical shifts in plot . Teiresias begins as a woman, Thérèse, with balloon breasts attached to strings, but soon manifests a...

illusion

illusion   Reference library

The Companion to Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
421 words

...illusionism as tools for preserving the bourgeois status quo ( see epic theatre ; bourgeois theatre ). Brecht argued that a focus on character-centred identification and linear plot encouraged a passive self-indulgent spectator with a fatalist outlook, one whose ability to reflect critically on social reality was inhibited. While his self-reflexive use of Verfremdung is sometimes described as anti-illusionist, to draw attention to the process of illusion making is itself an attempt to give the appearance of being true or real. Whenever makers of...

metatheatre

metatheatre   Reference library

David Pellegrini

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
943 words

...Self-reflexive drama or performance that reveals its artistic status to the audience . The reflexivity may be embedded in a script's structure by the playwright , when it can be called metadrama, or superimposed in production by the director or designer. In either instance, aesthetic self-consciousness is often presented in both artistic and metaphysical terms, especially in works that speculate on alternative versions of reality, including the artifice of representation. The play-within-the-play in Hamlet ( c. 1600 ) set the standard for the...

theatre-in-education

theatre-in-education   Reference library

Brian Woolland

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
490 words

...of children. Collaborative working practices are at the heart of the TIE movement. Plays are rarely self-contained, stand-alone entities: interactive workshops are usually an important part of the educational process. The performance elements of a TIE programme are thus often no less collaborative than the devising process itself. Much TIE can be seen as a development of Brechtian practice, with an emphasis on making an audience active and reflexive. In its heyday, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, TIE tended to be oppositional and political in the...

folk and folklore

folk and folklore   Reference library

John Barnes

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
705 words

...oral tradition from which many theatre practitioners in various cultures have drawn. Western culture is deeply originalist; the peoples of Europe have always been obsessed with where things and ideas came from. As democracy spread through European culture, critics came reflexively to attribute the origins and ‘vitality’ of artistic traditions to their roots in the oral tradition of the communal folk. Despite the poverty of evidence on any side of the question, drama was said to begin either in a primitive phase of undifferentiated classless society, or...

pastoral drama

pastoral drama   Reference library

Adrienne Scullion

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
612 words

...and commented on its contemporary context (the threat of war, status of women, faith and superstition). The success of Ramsay's pastoral inspired a host of imitators, including Theophilus Cibber 's ballad opera Pattie and Peggy ( 1730 ). In Kitty Clive 's hugely self-reflexive work The Rehearsal ( 1750 ), a popular divertissement of Garrick 's late management , the play-within-the-play is an elaborate pastoral fantasy and the genre is conceived of as hopelessly outmoded and artificial. Although the pastoral context remained significant in...

modernism and postmodernism

modernism and postmodernism   Reference library

Sally Banes and Noel Carroll

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,924 words

...in favour of more ordinary or everyday movement. Likewise, postmodernist visual art (by Ron Kitaj , Barbara Kruger , Cindy Sherman , and others) comes after modernist visual art (such as minimalism) and eschews the brand of formalism that emphasizes art for art's sake reflexivity and, in contrast, aspires to incorporate content and culture, both high and low, in its address. In its primary usage, the term ‘postmodernism’ is not merely the invention of critics. The artists who populate the relevant movements stand in an Oedipal relation to preceding...

performance art/art performance

performance art/art performance   Reference library

The Companion to Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
1,939 words

...as the tracery of the artist's performative act of painting. Although static, paintings were reconceived in action terms, rather than object terms, under the category of performance. Another interpretation, championed by Clement Greenberg , glossed abstract expressionism as reflexive reductionism which strove to reveal the essential conditions of painting. Art performance grew out of the repudiation of this essentialist approach to art, the belief that each art form has its own delimited nature, fixed by its medium. The most vividly remembered strategy of...

performance art/art performance

performance art/art performance   Reference library

Sally Banes, Noel Carroll, Sally Banes, Noel Carroll, Sally Banes, Noel Carroll, Sally Banes, and Noel Carroll

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,930 words

...performance as a break, rather than a continuity, with art-world polemics. While abstract expressionism was sometimes characterized as concerned with gesture and action, another interpretation, championed by Clement Greenberg , glossed abstract expressionism as an exercise in reflexive reductionism which strove to reveal the essential conditions of painting. In this view, the abstract expressionist developed the cubist project of acknowledging the surface of the picture plane and asserting its flatness. Art performance grew out of the repudiation of this...

dramatic theory

dramatic theory   Reference library

The Continuum Companion to Twentieth Century Theatre

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,140 words

...tradition, have all proved useful in various ways within this rapidly developing and highly diverse area of theoretical exploration. They have been apparent in the field of postmodernism, a term applied widely since the 1970s to drama experiments, usually highly self-reflexive or self-conscious, and often parodic and mixing elements of ‘high’ and ‘popular’ culture. Marvin Carlson See also modernism . Eric Bentley , ed., The Theory of the Modern Stage (1980) Marvin Carlson , Theories of the Theatre (1984). Sue-Ellen Case , Feminism and Theatre ...

directing in the twentieth century

directing in the twentieth century   Reference library

The Continuum Companion to Twentieth Century Theatre

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,283 words

...implications of this dialectical approach and was followed, among many others, by Strehler in Italy, Planchon and Chereau in France, Stein in Germany, Lyubimov in Russia. The work of these directors at its best has succeeded in combining political commitment with self-reflexive mastery of the stage and has resulted in productions of dazzling brilliance. It has flourished in countries where generous state subsidy is available to support theatres with rich technical resources. The man who is arguably the most influential of all twentieth-century...

acting

acting   Reference library

The Continuum Companion to Twentieth Century Theatre

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
4,214 words

..., soon began to emerge. Vsevelod Meyerhold favoured a more presentational style of performance, preferring the possibilities of the actor as cabotin – as a singer, dancer, juggler and tumbler. In his biomechanical system of training, Meyerhold laid a strong emphasis on reflexive and rhythmical impulses of the body as the resource for the actor's creativity, emphasizing ensemble playing in a highly physical form of theatricalized performance. However, Meyerhold never forgot the importance of the intellect: ‘I have no use for actors who know how to move...

South America

South America   Reference library

The Continuum Companion to Twentieth Century Theatre

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,961 words

...with Peter Weiss in second place. In fact, every device used by Brecht to ‘destroy the stage illusion’ has been effectively used by the new theatre artists. Simultaneously with the new theatre movement, realism in its multiple forms – ‘magic realism’, ‘poetic realism’, ‘reflexive realism’, ‘social realism’ – continued to yield works. The authors are many but there is space here to mention only a few of them, not already included above: in Argentina, Carlos Gorostiza (b. 1920 ), Roberto Cossa (b. 1934 ), Eduardo Pavlovsky (b. 1933 ) and Eduardo...

Brecht, Bertolt

Brecht, Bertolt (10 Feb. 1898)   Reference library

The Continuum Companion to Twentieth Century Theatre

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,548 words

...the rehearsal process, in which you have to find the external expression for what you think and what you want. You have to move away from intellectual acquisition to make your acting reflexive and convincing, and this only comes through training. Everything you do on stage must be a reaction, not independent or original, otherwise it does not belong there. Any work of art is a self-contained world and outside explanation is irrelevant. This was one of the difficulties of dogmatized socialist realism, which presumed a fixed moral position. I have to defend my...

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