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self-reflexive

Subject: Literature

A term applied to literary works that openly reflect upon their own processes of artful composition. Such self‐referentiality is frequently found in modern works of fiction that repeatedly ...

Avant-garde Dance

Avant-garde Dance   Reference library

The International Encyclopedia of Dance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Dance, Music
Length:
1,968 words

...choreographers such as Yvonne Rainer and Trisha Brown . So, too, is the proliferation of dances about social and political identity—in regard to issues of race, ethnicity, gender, sexual preference, and age—in the 1990s. While to many it might seem that, after the self-conscious reflexiveness of postmodern dance in the 1960s and 1970s, the avant-garde has reached the end of its road, its persistent, constant renewal shows that it continues to thrive, seeking new forms and outlets. Banes, Sally . Terpsichore in Sneakers: Post-Modern Dance . Boston, 1980....

Kinesiology

Kinesiology   Reference library

The International Encyclopedia of Dance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Dance, Music
Length:
5,680 words

...of dance movements from the perspective of physics, using technological recording and measuring tools. Grounded in biomechanical principles, the work of diverse researchers and practitioners has expanded the field of dance kinesiology. Exploration of the connection between reflexive action and personal behavior, health, and healing is exemplified in the work of Valerie Hunt and her students at the University of California—Los Angeles. The development of generic dance techniques has been led by Joan Skinner (Skinner Releasing Technique), Bonnie...

India

India   Reference library

Betty True Jones

The International Encyclopedia of Dance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Dance, Music
Length:
14,430 words

...fully understood nor their aesthetic purpose achieved (Kramrisch, 1928, pp. 2–5, 31–32). In classical dance and dance drama we can clearly see the interdependence of the arts. The relationships of time, measurement, tone, color, volume, and space in the various arts, and their reflexive development and interplay, are implied in the sage's reply to the kind. In painting and sculpture, as in dance, there are corresponding manipulations of volumes, the disposition of figures in space, and weight, density, and tension. Indeed, the vocabulary of attitudes, gestures,...

Methodologies In the Study of Dance

Methodologies In the Study of Dance   Reference library

The International Encyclopedia of Dance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Dance, Music
Length:
17,233 words

...lines of inquiry. Cultural theory as used here is an umbrella term that encompasses developments within post-structuralist textual criticism, cultural studies, contemporary Marxist and postcolonial discourse analysis, feminist and gender studies, and interpretive and reflexive research strategies. These areas of inquiry share a common orientation toward the natural as a historical and cultural category deserving critical investigation. Inquiries into what has been construed as natural in a given cultural and historical context have influenced methods...

Film Musicals

Film Musicals   Reference library

The International Encyclopedia of Dance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Dance, Music
Length:
8,757 words

...they are used to expand the range of vernacular dance. By convention ballet movement has become associated with high art and dream sequences, but within the totality of a film all dance functions to promote the values of popular entertainment. The musical in all its forms is self-reflexive; it inquires into the nature of popular entertainment and concludes that its own purpose is to allow audiences to lose themselves in an artificial world in which everyone sings of love and dances for joy. [For related discussion, see the entries on Astaire , Berkeley , ...

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