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self-reflexive

Subject: Literature

A term applied to literary works that openly reflect upon their own processes of artful composition. Such self‐referentiality is frequently found in modern works of fiction that repeatedly ...

Etiquette and Manners

Etiquette and Manners   Reference library

Oxford Encyclopedia of the Modern World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
History, Contemporary History (post 1945)
Length:
2,410 words
Illustration(s):
1

...and oneself. As manners turned from a set of general rules into guidelines differentiated according to the demands of the situation and relationship, they demanded and allowed for the shift from a second nature self-regulating conscience that to a great extent functions automatically, to a “third nature” personality with a more reflexive and flexible self-regulation. For such individuals it becomes increasingly natural to attune oneself to the pulls and pushes of both first and second nature, as well as to the dangers and chances, short term and long term, of...

The Sixties

The Sixties   Reference library

Robert O. Self

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Urban History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
History, Contemporary History (post 1945)
Length:
14,202 words

...property rights; the welfare state and civil rights should be resisted at every turn. Second, American foreign policy should be committed to the defeat , not simply containment, of global communism. Finally, the Republican Party, as both Goldwater and Schlafly saw it, had reflexively adopted Democratic policies under the leadership of Dwight Eisenhower rather than articulating clear ideological alternatives. Conservative groups like the Young Americans for Freedom (YAF), Americans for Goldwater, the John Birch Society, and the Orange County School of...

The Automobile and the American City

The Automobile and the American City   Reference library

David Blanke

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Urban History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
History, Contemporary History (post 1945)
Length:
11,091 words
Illustration(s):
3

...responded to a rising subjectivity in the minds of many urban residents toward the automobile. Faced with external risks they were unable to control—from pollution to auto accidents—and with little confidence in elected officials to mitigate these threats, many turned to a “reflexive modernization” that measured well-being through more personal and less material means. Scholars like Ulrich Beck theorized a “risk society” where citizens expressed greater concern over the abuses within the existing transit system than past planning failures that they could not...

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