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self-reflexive

Subject: Literature

A term applied to literary works that openly reflect upon their own processes of artful composition. Such self‐referentiality is frequently found in modern works of fiction that repeatedly ...

Latin pastoral poetry

Latin pastoral poetry  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Among Latin pastoralists Virgil stands supreme. He extended the boundaries of the genre which he had inherited from Theocritus, whose inspiration he acknowledges, and upon whom he draws in all his ...
pastoral poetry, Latin

pastoral poetry, Latin   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
267 words

...excelled). Both topics are central to pastoral. It is probably to the former of these that Horace 's description of the Eclogues , molle atque facētum (‘ tender and charming’) refers, though both adjectives have a stylistic connotation as well. The Eclogues are selfreflexive, experimental, and challenging, but none of the authors who follow Virgil can rival him in complexity or...

Medea

Medea   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,303 words
Illustration(s):
1

...and barbarian given definitive literary form by Euripides and Apollonius . Consequently Medea was no less popular in Roman literature than in Greek. The first century bce poet Ovid lavished attention on the murderous witch in several different contexts: she pens a self-reflexive yet accusatory letter to Jason in Heroides 12, her life story forms part of a series of violent mythical women in Metamorphoses 7, and Medea is the title of a (lost) tragedy. Valerius Flaccus’ Latin epic Argonautica , written in the late first century ce ,...

Theognis

Theognis (fl. 552–541bce)   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
785 words

...39–52 ), the woes of poverty ( 173–182 ) and exile ( 209–210 ), the stupidity of the demos or common people ( 847–850 ), and infidelity among boys ( 254–255 ), as well as advising on how to navigate these treacherous and dangerous waters. Of further interest is the explicit self-reflexivity of Theognis’ poetry: in addition to valuable allusions to aspects of its sympotic performance context (at lines 239–254 , 467, 503–508 , 533–534 , 837, 1047 , and others) and etiquette, the poet asserts the value of his verse (lines 28–38), its capacity to confer fame on...

pastoral poetry, Latin

pastoral poetry, Latin   Reference library

Lindsay Cameron Watson

The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
828 words

...topics are central to pastoral. It is probably to the former of these that Horace ’s famous verdict on the Eclogues, molle atque facetum (‘gentle and elegant’) ( Satirae 1. 10. 44) refers, though both adjectives have a stylistic connotation as well. The Eclogues are self-reflexive, experimental, and challenging, but none of the authors who follow Virgil can rival him in complexity and suggestiveness. With Calpurnius, and to a lesser extent the Einsiedeln eclogues, one has a sense that pastoral is being pushed to its furthest limits. Indeed, Calpurnius’...

pastoral poetry, Latin

pastoral poetry, Latin   Reference library

Lindsay Cameron Watson

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
967 words

...topics are central to pastoral. It is probably to the former of these that Horace 's famous verdict on the Eclogues, molle atque facetum (‘gentle and elegant’) ( Satirae 1. 10. 44) refers, though both adjectives have a stylistic connotation as well. The Eclogues are self-reflexive, experimental, and challenging, but none of the authors who follow Virgil can rival him in complexity and suggestiveness. With Calpurnius, and to a lesser extent the Einsiedeln eclogues, one has a sense that pastoral is being pushed to its furthest limits. Indeed, Calpurnius'...

Poetry, Greek

Poetry, Greek   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
29,051 words
Illustration(s):
4

...not only can elegy's derivation from epic not be assumed—they are likely cognate genres, reciprocal in their influence—but the poetry of Homer and the elegists thrived contemporaneously. By the late fifth-century elegy, some distinctive trends become apparent: a greater reflexivity about itself as genre and about the topoi of sympotic verse; a strong association, in Athens at least, with more elitist, oligarchic politics—the elite symposium as venue of the political hetaireiai (drinking clubs)—as seen in the elegist and political figure Critias and in...

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