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perpendicular style

perpendicular style   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Construction, Surveying and Civil Engineering

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... style Gothic architecture that is exaggerated by vertical straight and slender aspects such as windows and...

perpendicular style

perpendicular style   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
34 words

... style Final period of English Gothic architecture, from c .1330 to the mid-16th century. Named after the strong vertical lines of its window tracery and panelling, characteristic features are fan vaulting and flattened...

perpendicular style

perpendicular style   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Archaeology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Archaeology, History
Length:
71 words

... style [De] A style of architecture found in Britain in the late 14th century ad through to the 16th century ad in which there is a strong emphasis on the vertical elements of construction and decoration. Pointed arches common in earlier centuries are flattened and arches and windows become framed by rectangular outlines. Towers of great height are added to ecclesiastical buildings and ceilings and roofs are often richly...

Perpendicular style

Perpendicular style   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Northern Renaissance Art

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
1,123 words

... style . Term used to describe a style of Gothic architecture, peculiar to England, that flourished from the 14th century to the early 16th. The term, devised by Thomas Rickman, covers the style that emerged from designs by the workshop at St Stephen's Chapel (after 1292 ) in the Palace of Westminster. The essence of Perpendicular is regularity: straight lines or crystalline shapes, a thin and transparent structure exploiting stained glass on the inner surface, monochrome building materials, modular repetition and a fineness of detail almost...

Perpendicular style

Perpendicular style   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Medieval Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Art & Architecture, History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
1,289 words
Illustration(s):
1

... style Term used to describe a style of Gothic architecture, peculiar to England, that flourished from the 14th century to the early 16th ( see Gothic architecture , II, 2 ). The term, devised by Thomas Rickman in the early 19th century, covers the style that emerged from designs by the workshop at St Stephen’s Perpendicular style.  Fan vault of Henry VII’s Chapel, Westminster Abbey, London, c. 1503–19. Photo credit: Werner Forman/Art Resource, NY Chapel (after 1292 ) in the Palace of Westminster ( see London , IV, 3(i)(a) ). The essence...

Historic Churches

Historic Churches   Quick reference

David Hey

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,420 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...with the simple Y‐tracery of the Early English style and the geometric and exuberant designs of the Decorated style during the 13th and early 14th centuries. English styles had until then copied the French, but from the middle years of the 14th century until the Reformation and later a native style known as Perpendicular Gothic was developed. This is named after the perpendicular lines of the mullions in the windows (which were enlarged until they filled all the available space in the walls), but the style includes much more than that, e.g. flat lead...

Rickman, Thomas

Rickman, Thomas   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
35 words

...Thomas ( 1776–1841 ) Church architect whose Styles of Architecture in England ( 1817 ) was the first serious attempt at classifying successive styles. His terminology, e.g. Early English , Decorated , Perpendicular , is still...

Perpendicular architecture

Perpendicular architecture   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
78 words

... architecture The last of the Gothic styles of the Middle Ages and the only one to be peculiarly English. The east window of Gloucester Cathedral is an early example, pre‐dating the Black Death . The style remained popular for another 200 years, until the Reformation . It is distinguished by the straight mullions of the windows, by ranges of clerestory windows surmounted by battlements and pinnacles, and by splendid towers. See J. H. Harvey , The Perpendicular Style, 1330–1485 ...

Early English

Early English   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
59 words

...developed a native Gothic idiom: Canterbury Cathedral is an early example. Later works emphasized appearance: builders ornamented visible walls, such as Rievaulx Abbey, or made prominent use of vault ribbing, such as Lincoln Cathedral . See also decorated style ; perpendicular ...

Gothic

Gothic   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Archaeology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Archaeology, History
Length:
87 words

...[De] Architectural style characterized by pointed arches and the vault, succeeding the Norman or Romanesque style at the end of the 12th century ad . Subdivided into three periods: early (13th century ad ), characterized by the lancet window without tracery; the decorated Gothic ( c .1290–1350 ), in which windows have first geometrical, then flowing, tracery; and the perpendicular ( c .1350–1530 ), where tracery has strong vertical lines. The Gothic style was followed by the Tudor style, but was later revived as neo‐Gothic or Gothic during the 19th...

Perpendicular

Perpendicular   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Art Terms (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
144 words

... The last of the English Gothic styles of architecture, it developed in the 14th century and survived until as late as the early 17th. It is characterized by straight verticals and horizontals, especially in tracery . There is overall emphasis on the panel motif, both in tracery and in blank-wall decoration. Arches are flat and vaulting complex (culminating in the English fan pattern). One of the most important early Perpendicular structures is the chancel of Gloucester Cathedral, while from the middle period of the style there are the ...

Gothic

Gothic   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
189 words

... style from the late 12th century onwards with the destruction of ancient Rome by the Goths. The Gothic style was introduced from France for monasteries and cathedrals and was used subsequently for parish churches and secular buildings ( see also historic churches ). Thomas Rickman divided the Gothic ecclesiastical styles into Early English , Decorated , and Perpendicular . The term ‘Tudor Court Gothic’ is used to describe Hampton Court and other royal palaces and the Elizabethan prodigy‐houses which were influenced by them. The Gothic style...

Gloucester, diocese of

Gloucester, diocese of   Quick reference

A Dictionary of British History (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
64 words

...diocese of The see, conterminous with Gloucestershire, was founded in 1541 by Henry VIII from part of the Worcester diocese. The Norman cathedral, previously St Peter's Benedictine abbey church, was partly transformed in Perpendicular style, reputedly the earliest example, by the inflow of money from pilgrims to the shrine of Edward II. The 14th‐cent. fan‐vaulted cloisters are among the finest in...

Perpendicular architecture

Perpendicular architecture   Reference library

T. E. Faulkner

The Oxford Companion to British History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
449 words

...), with its remarkable pendant-vaulted roof, is another excellent example. Quintessentially Perpendicular is King’s College chapel , Cambridge ( 1447–1515 ), where the new, more open concept of space and light is seen to advantage in a building almost like an elaborate cage of glass and stone. This had later parallels in the development of domestic architecture during the Tudor period, as at Hardwick Hall , Derbyshire (‘more glass than wall’). The Perpendicular style seems to have originated in the remodelling of the choir and east end of Gloucester cathedral...

Oxford, St Mary the Virgin

Oxford, St Mary the Virgin   Reference library

A. S. Hargreaves

The Oxford Companion to British History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
105 words

...centre of the fledgling medieval university, St Mary’s was the seat of its government, academic disputation, and award of degrees until the mid-17th cent.; the attached Old Congregation House ( c. 1320 ) contained the first university library. Considerably rebuilt in the perpendicular style, it hosted the trials of the Oxford martyrs ( Latimer , Ridley , Cranmer ) in 1554–6 , gained the Laudian ‘Virgin porch’ whose Marian statue so incensed the puritans, heard Wesley and Newman preach, and saw the launch of the ‘Oxford’ or ‘tractarian’ movement for...

Westminster Abbey

Westminster Abbey   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
114 words

...the abbey church of a Benedictine monastery (closed 1539 ). In 1050 , Edward the Confessor began to build a Norman church on the site. In 1245 , Henry III began work on the present structure. The Lady Chapel, dedicated to Henry VII , is a fine example of the perpendicular style . The two western towers were built ( 1722–45 ) by Sir Christopher Wren and Nicholas Hawksmoor . The 19th-century restoration was managed by Sir George Gilbert Scott . The Abbey is cruciform in plan. Since William the Conqueror , most English monarchs have been crowned...

Windsor Castle and chapel

Windsor Castle and chapel   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
106 words

...its building in *stone by *William ‘the Conqueror’ . It was expanded and rebuilt c .1344–63 by *Edward III , including a *chapel of St George for his knights of the *Garter . The chapel was magnificently rebuilt by *Edward IV and *Henry VII ( 1473–1507 ) in Perpendicular style. See also art and architecture: gothic . Daniel Williman B. J. W. Hill , Windsor Castle (1972). R. South , The Book of Windsor (1977). N. Williams , Royal Homes ...

Worcester

Worcester   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
116 words

...(completed in 983). After this had been destroyed by the Danes, it was rebuilt ( 1084–9 ) by St Wulfstan ; after a fire and the collapse of the central tower, it was restored and reconsecrated in 1218 . It has been much altered. The choir is Early English and the nave Perpendicular in style. The monastery was suppressed in 1540 and a secular chapter was in place by 1542...

Ramsey, William de

Ramsey, William de (1349)   Reference library

Anthony Quiney

The Oxford Companion to Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
118 words

...William de (d. 1349 ) English mason , the greatest of a family of perhaps seven masons working in London and Norwich. William III de Ramsey was a key protagonist of the Perpendicular style, working at Westminster Palace ( 1325 ), and perhaps in Norwich, before he started the new octagonal chapter house and cloister at St Paul’s Cathedral ( 1332 ), recorded by Hollar before destruction in the Great Fire. He worked at the Tower of London ( 1335 ) and Lichfield Cathedral ( 1337 ), and may have designed the cloister at Windsor Castle (from 1337 ). A...

Rickman, Thomas

Rickman, Thomas (1776–1841)   Reference library

Anthony Quiney

The Oxford Companion to Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
102 words

...Thomas ( 1776–1841 ) English architect . In 1807 Rickman began closely observing medieval churches and particularly their tracery. Classifying this under the terms ‘Norman’, ‘Early English’, ‘Decorated’, and ‘Perpendicular’, he published his findings as An Attempt to Discriminate the Styles of English Architecture ( 1817 ), and they have been accepted ever since. As a self-taught architect he was very successful, adding Gothic dress to Georgian preaching boxes with conviction at Hampton Lucy, Warwickshire ( 1822–6 ), Ombersley, Worcestershire (...

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