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Gothic

Gothic   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

...of or in the style of architecture prevalent in western Europe in the 12th–16th centuries (and revived in the mid 18th to early 20th centuries), characterized by pointed arches, rib vaults, and flying buttresses, together with large windows and elaborate tracery. English Gothic architecture is divided into Early English, Decorated, and Perpendicular. The word comes via French or late Latin from Gothi ‘the Goths’, and was used in the 17th and 18th centuries to mean ‘not classical’ (i.e. not Greek or Roman), and hence to refer to medieval architecture...

perpendicular

perpendicular   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
43 words

... situated or having a direction at right angles XIV (not gen. current till XVI); applied to the third style of English pointed architecture XIX; sb. XVI. — L. perpendiculāris , f. perpendiculum plummet, plumb-line, f. PER- 2 + pendēre hang; see PENDENT , -CULE , -AR...

ham

ham n. 1   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
1,598 words

...Spade’ in King Black Short Story Anthol. ( 1972 ) 172: Dancing like some ham-hocking gig-a-boo. ham-match ( n. ) [fig. use of SE match , a contest] a stand-up luncheon. 1890 Daily Tel. 4 Feb. n.p.: At one o'clock they relieve their exhausted frames by taking perpendicular refreshment – vulgarly termed a ham-match – at some City luncheon bar [F&H]. ham sandwich ( n. ) see separate entries. ham snatcher ( n. ) [lit. one who steals hams] ( US black ) a looter, breaking into stores during urban riots. 1994 C. Major Juba to Jive 221: ...

strike me…!

strike me…! excl.   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
3,181 words

...if I've seen it [i.e. a place of work] these three months. strike me paralytic! see strike me blind! above. strike me perp(endicular)! [var. on strike me dead! above] a general excl. of surprise, alarm, shock etc. 1899 W.T. Goodge ‘Hits! Skits! & Jingles!’ in Wannan Folklore of Aus. Pub ( 1972 ) 30: Says he, ‘Strike me perpendic'lar / But you beggars are partic'lar.’ 1914 E. Pugh Cockney At Home 67: ‘Strike me perpendicular!’ he says, a-takin off his coat all in a flare and fluster. [Ibid.] ‘Strike me perp!’ he says, ‘if I don't 'ave a cut at...

badger

badger n. 1   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
2,066 words

...compounds badger-box ( n. ) ( Aus. ) ‘a roughly-constructed dwelling’ (Morris, Austral English , 1898 ). 1875 in Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania Sept. 99: The dwellings occupied by the piners when up the river are of the style known as ‘Badger-boxes,’ in distinction from huts, which have perpendicular walls, while the Badger-box is like an inverted V in section [etc.]. badger-gassing ( n. ) ( UK juv. ) an especially foul-smelling breaking of wind. 2001 OnLine Dict. of Playground Sl. [Internet] badger gassing v. to break wind in a...

Mansard roof

Mansard roof   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...roof Also called a curb roof, this was named after the French architect François Mansart ( 1598–1666 ), although the style was used by Pierre Lescot ( c. 1510–78 ) at the Louvre in about 1550 . Instead of forming an L-shape, the lower slope is almost perpendicular, while the upper is at a gentler angle. It was in use in the USA in the old colonial days, and there the term denotes a double-pitched roof, sloping up from the four sides of a building. Where it ends in two gables it is called a gambrel...

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