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Reinhardt, Ad

Reinhardt, Ad (1913)   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
3,416 words
Illustration(s):
1

...relationships among lines and planes forming a dynamic “system.” The idealist and utopian construal of concrete form similarly holds true in Mondrian's scheme of things, for, having penetrated nature, abstraction has achieved the “expression of relationships” exclusively. Perpendicularity expresses the “one permanent relationship,” attaining, as it does, an equilibrium of spirit with matter, active with passive, male with female, truth with beauty. Reinhardt will assume the mantle of this aesthetic. By the late 1940s, he will have adapted a version of...

Reinhardt, Ad

Reinhardt, Ad (1913–1967)   Reference library

Marjorie Welish

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
3,468 words
Illustration(s):
1

...relationships among lines and planes forming a dynamic “system.” The idealist and utopian construal of concrete form similarly holds true in Mondrian’s scheme of things, for, having penetrated nature, abstraction has achieved the “expression of relationships” exclusively. Perpendicularity expresses the “one permanent relationship,” attaining, as it does, an equilibrium of spirit with matter, active with passive, male with female, truth with beauty. Reinhardt will assume the mantle of this aesthetic. By the late 1940s, he will have adapted a version of...

SUBLIME

SUBLIME   Reference library

Baldine Saint-Girons

Dictionary of Untranslatables: A Philosophical Lexicon

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Philosophy, Literature, Literary reference works
Length:
5,508 words

...a rhetorical style: it is to be found in neither the Rhetorica ad Herennium nor the De oratore of Cicero. Thus the expression “genus sublime dicendi” receives its quarters of nobility only with Quintilian, after whom the sublime style referred to the grand style, that is, the grave but also vehement style of the rhetorical tradition ( Institutio oratoria , 12.10). The rhetorical tradition, having as its Latin source the Rhetorica ad Herennium (between 86 and 83 BCE ), generally distinguishes three styles. The function of the first style is to teach (...

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