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Historic Churches

Historic Churches   Quick reference

David Hey

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,420 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...with the simple Y‐tracery of the Early English style and the geometric and exuberant designs of the Decorated style during the 13th and early 14th centuries. English styles had until then copied the French, but from the middle years of the 14th century until the Reformation and later a native style known as Perpendicular Gothic was developed. This is named after the perpendicular lines of the mullions in the windows (which were enlarged until they filled all the available space in the walls), but the style includes much more than that, e.g. flat lead...

Rickman, Thomas

Rickman, Thomas   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
35 words

...Thomas ( 1776–1841 ) Church architect whose Styles of Architecture in England ( 1817 ) was the first serious attempt at classifying successive styles. His terminology, e.g. Early English , Decorated , Perpendicular , is still...

Perpendicular architecture

Perpendicular architecture   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
78 words

... architecture The last of the Gothic styles of the Middle Ages and the only one to be peculiarly English. The east window of Gloucester Cathedral is an early example, pre‐dating the Black Death . The style remained popular for another 200 years, until the Reformation . It is distinguished by the straight mullions of the windows, by ranges of clerestory windows surmounted by battlements and pinnacles, and by splendid towers. See J. H. Harvey , The Perpendicular Style, 1330–1485 ...

Gothic

Gothic   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
189 words

... style from the late 12th century onwards with the destruction of ancient Rome by the Goths. The Gothic style was introduced from France for monasteries and cathedrals and was used subsequently for parish churches and secular buildings ( see also historic churches ). Thomas Rickman divided the Gothic ecclesiastical styles into Early English , Decorated , and Perpendicular . The term ‘Tudor Court Gothic’ is used to describe Hampton Court and other royal palaces and the Elizabethan prodigy‐houses which were influenced by them. The Gothic style...

medieval architecture

medieval architecture   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
644 words

...English Perpendicular style developed independently from Continental styles such as the Flamboyant. The mid‐ 14th‐century cathedral at Gloucester contains the earliest example of a large east window with Perpendicular tracery, and, another English speciality, the fan‐vault. England also acquired a reputation for the ability of its designers and craftsmen to span huge roofs in secular buildings. The hammerbeam roof of Westminster Hall, designed by Hugh Herland and constructed between 1394 and 1400 , is the finest in Europe. The Gothic style continued in...

architectural styles

architectural styles   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
1,666 words

...churches and secular halls. The window styles of the open hall of Stokesay Castle (Shropshire), for example, are similar to those in contemporary late 13th‐century churches. Window styles are the first point of reference for dating. The English Gothic styles are divided into three main phases: Early English ( 1170–1300 ), Decorated ( 1300–50 ), and Perpendicular ( 1350–1550 ). The grandest secular buildings continued to use Gothic forms throughout the 16th century. The Tudor court Gothic style of Hampton Court influenced building in the provinces....

Perpendicular architecture

Perpendicular architecture   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Local and Family History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
45 words

... architecture . The last of the Gothic styles of the Middle Ages and the only one to be peculiarly English. The style is distinguished by the straight mullions of the windows, by ranges of clerestorey windows surmounted by battlements and pinnacles, and by splendid towers...

Gothic

Gothic   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Local and Family History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
121 words

...of the Romanesque style from the late 12th century onwards with the destruction of ancient Rome by the Goths. The Gothic style was introduced from France for monasteries and cathedrals and was used subsequently for parish churches and secular buildings. Thomas Rickman divided the Gothic ecclesiastical styles into Early English , Decorated , and Perpendicular . The term ‘Tudor Court Gothic’ is used to describe Hampton Court and other royal palaces and the Elizabethan prodigy-houses which were influenced by them. The Gothic style never completely...

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