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geochronometry

The determination of the length of time intervals. Geochronometric resolutions for zonations based on different organisms may be calculated by dividing the time-span of a series by the ...

geochronometry

geochronometry   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Geology and Earth Sciences (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

... The determination of the length of time intervals. Geochronometric resolutions for zonations based on different organisms may be calculated by dividing the time-span of a series by the number of zones and the intervals between zones. However, this will give only an approximate measure of time. See also dating methods ; geochronology...

geochronometry

geochronometry   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Ecology (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... The determination of the length of time intervals. Geochronometric resolutions for zonations based on different organisms may be calculated by dividing the time-span of a series by the number of zones and the intervals between zones. However, this will give only an approximate measure of...

dating methods

dating methods   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Geology and Earth Sciences (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

... lithologies , and cross-cutting relationships do enable the geologist to give an approximate relative age in field studies. See also absolute age ; radioactive decay ; radiometric dating ; isotopic dating ; radiocarbon dating ; dendrochronology ; geochronology ; geochronometry ; varve analysis...

geochronology

geochronology   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Geology and Earth Sciences (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

...age in years for a given rock or fossil . Relative dating involves the use of fossils or sediments to place events and rock sequences in order, and does not provide absolute dates. See also dating methods ; absolute age ; relative age ; planktonic geochronology ; geochronometry...

Holmes, Arthur

Holmes, Arthur (1890–1965)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Earth

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

...Arthur ( 1890–1965 ) Arthur Holmes was one of the most distinguished British geologists of the twentieth century. He carried out some outstanding research in geochemistry, made an early but highly significant contribution to geochronometry and the determination of the age of the Earth, proposed a mechanism to drive continental drift, and wrote a best-selling and innovative textbook, which ran to four editions. In 1907 Holmes entered Imperial College to read physics, and then stayed on for a further degree in geology. Field experience in Mozambique...

stratigraphy

stratigraphy   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Earth

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Science and technology, Earth Sciences and Geography
Length:
2,127 words
Illustration(s):
1

...of the more recent geological periods is more accessible than that of very ancient times, and the problems encountered in the higher (i.e. younger) parts of the stratigraphical column tend to be different from those found below. As research continues and our methods of geochronometry improve, some of the problems may be resolved, but it remains a truism that the older rock formations, and especially those that have been severely deformed, are the more difficult to date and correlate. Stratigraphy, then, was originally concerned with rocks, that is,...

corals and related fossils

corals and related fossils   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Earth

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Science and technology, Earth Sciences and Geography
Length:
927 words
Illustration(s):
1

...temperatures at low as 1 °C. Corals are generally too long-ranged to be useful zonally, although they have been used in Europe in the Early Carboniferous, where A. Vaughan established a zonal scheme in 1905 based on corals and brachiopods. They have, however, been useful in geochronometry. Many rugose and scleractinian corals show fine daily growth increments, which are often grouped in monthly and yearly annulations by growth constrictions. Study of Palaeozoic corals by Colin Scrutton of the University of Durham (England) has indicated that there were an...

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