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fundamental rule of psychoanalysis

The principle according to which a patient undergoing psychoanalysis should engage wholeheartedly in free association. Also called the basic rule of psychoanalysis. See also ...

fundamental rule of psychoanalysis

fundamental rule of psychoanalysis n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... rule of psychoanalysis n. The principle according to which a patient undergoing psychoanalysis should engage wholeheartedly in free association . Also called the basic rule of psychoanalysis . See also intellectualization , therapeutic alliance...

basic rule of psychoanalysis

basic rule of psychoanalysis n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...rule of psychoanalysis n. Another name for the fundamental rule of psychoanalysis...

therapeutic alliance

therapeutic alliance n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...alliance n . In psychoanalysis , the implicit cooperative compact between an analyst and a patient whereby the analyst undertakes to offer interpretations ( 2 ) and the patient undertakes to obey the fundamental rule of psychoanalysis and to try to understand the analyst’s...

intellectualization

intellectualization n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... n . In psychoanalysis , a defence mechanism involving excessive abstract thinking designed to block out disturbing emotions or conflicts, in therapy usually a device for evading the fundamental rule of psychoanalysis . The concept was introduced by the Austrian-born British psychoanalyst Anna Freud ( 1895–1982 ) in her book The Ego and the Mechanisms of Defence ( 1937 ), her father never having used the term in...

abstinence rule

abstinence rule n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...rule n. In psychoanalysis , the organization of treatment to minimize the substitutive satisfaction of needs related to symptoms that the patient finds outside the analytic situation, in spite of the frustration and suffering that can result. Sigmund Freud ( 1856–1939 ) introduced the rule in an article on ‘Observations on Transference-Love’ ( 1915 ): ‘I shall state it as a fundamental principle that the patient's need and longing should be allowed to persist in her, in order that they may serve as forces impelling her to do work and to make...

free association

free association n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...‘a fairly complete reproduction of the memories and new impressions which have affected her since our last talk, and it often leads on, in a quite unexpected way, to pathogenic reminiscences of which she unburdens herself without being asked to’ (p. 56). At about the same time (in 1904 ) and independently of Freud, Carl Gustav Jung ( 1875–1961 ) introduced his word-association test , and this also influenced the development of the technique of free association. See also dream analysis , fundamental rule of psychoanalysis . Compare directed...

Psychoanalytic Methods and Critical Cultural Studies

Psychoanalytic Methods and Critical Cultural Studies   Reference library

Atilla Hallsby

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Communication and Critical Cultural Studies

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Social sciences
Length:
14,688 words
Illustration(s):
7

...Lacan’s major contributions to psychoanalysis are organized according to his four fundamental concepts ( unconscious , repetition , transference , and drive ), the registers of the unconscious ( imaginary, symbolic , and real ), and his The “Seminar on ‘The Purloined Letter.’” This section ends by considering several of the major debates over Lacanian psychoanalysis in RS and how they privilege different elements of Lacan’s unconscious. The Four Fundamental Concepts of Psychoanalysis Each of Lacan’s four fundamental concepts, explained in Lacan’s 11th...

Film Theory, Feminist

Film Theory, Feminist   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Women's Writing in the United States

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
2,169 words

...worked as a textual system capable of producing strong effects of identification and investment vis-à-vis the spectator. Hence the importance of the gaze. If cinema is primarily a visual medium, then the gaze is what draws the spectator into the dramas of seeing and being seen, and what creates the fundamental narrative and visual components of the cinema, from point-of-view shots to rules of continuity. Another important feature of 1970s film theory was the distinction between dominant and alternative cinemas. Analyses of the apparatus and the gaze took...

Freud, Sigmund

Freud, Sigmund   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of British Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature
Length:
6,423 words

...of Jews were massacred. The narrative assimilates this historical tragedy of the Nazi Holocaust to Anna's fictional life, revealing Anna/Lisa's horrible death. Ultimately, the novel appears to question the nature of psychoanalytic truth, but as Peter Brooks argues in Psychoanalysis and Storytelling ( 1994 ), Freud's late work also argues for the significance of conviction as a kind of fictive truth that supersedes the elusive nature of both historical truth and recovered memories. Brooks stresses the significance of transference to the understanding of...

Metonymy

Metonymy   Reference library

Stephen Melville

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
3,666 words

...by using their ability to replace the Freudian notions of condensation and displacement as a part of his general claim that the unconscious is structured as a language, and then by extending them to take in the fundamental dimensions of human being as psychoanalysis proposes them—identity and its support in repression, which Lacan argues to be fundamentally metaphoric (the submission of one signifier to another, forcing the first into the unconscious), and desire, the movement of which Lacan takes to be fundamentally metonymic, enchaining one...

Metonymy

Metonymy   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
3,533 words

...by using their ability to replace the Freudian notions of condensation and displacement as a part of his general claim that the unconscious is structured as a language, and then by extending them to take in the fundamental dimensions of human being as psychoanalysis proposes them—identity and its support in repression, which Lacan argues to be fundamentally metaphoric (the submission of one signifier to another, forcing the first into the unconscious), and desire, the movement of which Lacan takes to be fundamentally metonymic, enchaining one object to...

Damisch, Hubert

Damisch, Hubert (b. 1928)   Reference library

Ernst van Alphen

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
2,391 words

...the process of viewing it. Through a rigorous analysis of the concept of beauty in philosophy and psychoanalysis, and a consideration of the motif of beauty in Western myths and art, Damisch succeeds again in formulating an aspect of art that makes it attractive . Damisch offers this time what Freud himself did not venture: a psychoanalysis of aesthetics. The three theoretical constructions he thus offers in these three studies outline the rules of interaction of which culture consists. They regulate three of the most fundamental domains of culture:...

Gender

Gender   Reference library

Deborah F. Sawyer

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Bible and Gender Studies

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion, Social sciences, Sociology
Length:
6,164 words

...leading to the separation of Psyche and Po from the rest of the women’s groups. This rift reached beyond the borders of France, manifesting itself globally in the repeated clash between the Psyche and Po group and their adherents on one side and egalitarian feminists and lesbian separatist groups on the other. The spirit and momentum of Paris in 1968 united the theorists of Psyche and Po, and while over time each evolved their ideas as individual thinkers, they shared another foundational influence: the psychoanalysis of Jacques Lacan. Feminist...

Pleasure

Pleasure   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
5,000 words

...which expresses a planet on the brink of self-annihilation and, more particularly, art on the brink of self-annihilation (see Foster, 1993 , and Herwitz, 1995 ). [ See Freud .] Lacan's complex “writing through” of Freud has engendered in his followers a picture of the poetic as an existential and indeed metaphysical state in which the symbolic rule of the father is partly “suspended.” Through an amalgamation of psychoanalysis and avant-garde culture, Lacanians associate the poetically amniotic and disruptive values of modernist writing with the capacity for...

Theories of Art

Theories of Art   Reference library

Stephen Davies

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
7,330 words

...discussion of art: Marxism, psychoanalysis, and feminism (treated as if they were unitary theories). Karl Marx ( 1818–1883 ), in his attempt to explain the material (economic) relations that determine social relations, and the implications of these for the unfolding of history, regarded art, and “culture” in general, as belonging to sets of ideas (the “superstructure”) in a society that are determined by economic relations (the “infrastructure”) and the patterns of power generated by these relations. Sigmund Freud ( 1856–1939 ) presented an account of human...

Ricoeur, Paul

Ricoeur, Paul (1913–)   Reference library

The Dictionary of Modern American Philosophers

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
3,844 words

...precede consciousness. Understanding is never a matter of grasping a literal truth, but of unfolding the multiple layers of meaning that comprise the world of the text – a process equivalent to psychoanalysis; this accounts for Ricoeur’s naming Freud (along with Marx and Nietzsche) among his “masters of suspicion,” a term that expresses the need for constant vigilance against the seduction of the literal. In his theory of narrative identity, Ricoeur synthesizes this reading of Freud and the theory of textual identity as outlined above. His primary objective,...

Theories of Art

Theories of Art   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
7,130 words

...the aesthetics of Western art. These variously identify mimesis, expression, form, or historical process as central to art's distinctive character or purpose. Two broad trends in the approach to art—autonomism and contextualism—are then contrasted. The suppositions of autonomism have dominated the discussion of art over much of the past two hundred years; contextualism represents a recent reaction to autonomism. Next, the suppositions of modernism and their rejection by postmodernists are outlined. A final section considers Marxism, psychoanalysis, and feminism...

Social Work Practice

Social Work Practice   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Social Work (20 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008

...the first three decades of the 20th century. Eherenreich ( 1985 ) observes that the rediscovery of poverty and the changing national mood toward social programs created a crisis for the profession. It did not, on balance, lead to much in the way of changes in social work practice. Freud and psychoanalysis became very influential in social work from the early part of the 20th century until the sixties. This period, often called the Psychoanalytical Deluge, saw social workers eagerly adopting psychoanalysis as a means to solve several of the profession's needs....

Literary Theory

Literary Theory   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of British Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature
Length:
8,606 words

...and decimating local cultures. Fundamental to the colonizing process was the slave trade, the dehumanizing practice of forced labor, based largely in Africa, which drove the economies and shaped the values of the early modern age, and the legacy of which continues to impact the world today. Decolonization. The late 1940s to the 1960s was an era of accelerated decolonization, marking a new phase in the history of globalization. At that time, numerous colonies sought and achieved independence from European rule and formed new nations, including India...

Spinoza, Benedict de

Spinoza, Benedict de (1632–77)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Mind (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, Philosophy
Length:
1,664 words

...becomes more under our control, and the mind is less passive in respect to it, in proportion as it is more known to us.’ This account of active self-improvement through the analysis and clarification of ideas has led some commentators to greet Spinoza as an early precursor of Freudian psychoanalysis. For Spinoza, the mastery of emotions, and the state of improved understanding achieved through the mind's reasoning powers, enables us to become more active and free. But the freedom which Spinoza grants us has seemed to some to be no freedom at all. When...

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