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fundamental rule of psychoanalysis

The principle according to which a patient undergoing psychoanalysis should engage wholeheartedly in free association. Also called the basic rule of psychoanalysis. See also ...

Gender

Gender   Reference library

Deborah F. Sawyer

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Bible and Gender Studies

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion, Social sciences, Sociology
Length:
6,164 words

...leading to the separation of Psyche and Po from the rest of the women’s groups. This rift reached beyond the borders of France, manifesting itself globally in the repeated clash between the Psyche and Po group and their adherents on one side and egalitarian feminists and lesbian separatist groups on the other. The spirit and momentum of Paris in 1968 united the theorists of Psyche and Po, and while over time each evolved their ideas as individual thinkers, they shared another foundational influence: the psychoanalysis of Jacques Lacan. Feminist...

Sexuality

Sexuality   Reference library

Teresa J. Hornsby

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Bible and Gender Studies

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion, Social sciences, Sociology
Length:
5,007 words

...begin to associate that pleasure with something outside of ourselves; desire has a source and an object: the mother’s nipple, her gaze, the sound of her voice. In this phase, famously known as the mirror phase, we see a reflection of our self; we know that we are both self and other. We are beginning to move away from a sense of wholeness, from a self-identity whose desires are fundamental and somewhat simple. Our self in the mirror is “other” in that it is “me” over there. Yet, it is a perfect image, one that we despise because it is better, but one that we...

Sexual Reform and Morality

Sexual Reform and Morality   Reference library

April Haynes

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Social History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...( 1910 – 2010 During the early twentieth century, psychoanalysis and sexology diminished the influence of social purity. Sigmund Freud’s concept of the libido suggested that suppressing sexual expression was wrongheaded. The sexologist Havelock Ellis elaborated on the individual nature of sexuality by exploring “inversion” (homosexuality), by redefining masturbation as benign “autoeroticism,” and by advocating “the erotic rights of woman.” Margaret Sanger considered birth control the most fundamental of women’s rights; her challenge to the Comstock Act...

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