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fundamental rule of psychoanalysis

The principle according to which a patient undergoing psychoanalysis should engage wholeheartedly in free association. Also called the basic rule of psychoanalysis. See also ...

fundamental rule of psychoanalysis

fundamental rule of psychoanalysis n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

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Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... rule of psychoanalysis n. The principle according to which a patient undergoing psychoanalysis should engage wholeheartedly in free association . Also called the basic rule of psychoanalysis . See also intellectualization , therapeutic alliance...

basic rule of psychoanalysis

basic rule of psychoanalysis n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...rule of psychoanalysis n. Another name for the fundamental rule of psychoanalysis...

therapeutic alliance

therapeutic alliance n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...alliance n . In psychoanalysis , the implicit cooperative compact between an analyst and a patient whereby the analyst undertakes to offer interpretations ( 2 ) and the patient undertakes to obey the fundamental rule of psychoanalysis and to try to understand the analyst’s...

intellectualization

intellectualization n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

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Current Version:
2015

... n . In psychoanalysis , a defence mechanism involving excessive abstract thinking designed to block out disturbing emotions or conflicts, in therapy usually a device for evading the fundamental rule of psychoanalysis . The concept was introduced by the Austrian-born British psychoanalyst Anna Freud ( 1895–1982 ) in her book The Ego and the Mechanisms of Defence ( 1937 ), her father never having used the term in...

abstinence rule

abstinence rule n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

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Current Version:
2015

...rule n. In psychoanalysis , the organization of treatment to minimize the substitutive satisfaction of needs related to symptoms that the patient finds outside the analytic situation, in spite of the frustration and suffering that can result. Sigmund Freud ( 1856–1939 ) introduced the rule in an article on ‘Observations on Transference-Love’ ( 1915 ): ‘I shall state it as a fundamental principle that the patient's need and longing should be allowed to persist in her, in order that they may serve as forces impelling her to do work and to make...

free association

free association n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

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Current Version:
2015

...‘a fairly complete reproduction of the memories and new impressions which have affected her since our last talk, and it often leads on, in a quite unexpected way, to pathogenic reminiscences of which she unburdens herself without being asked to’ (p. 56). At about the same time (in 1904 ) and independently of Freud, Carl Gustav Jung ( 1875–1961 ) introduced his word-association test , and this also influenced the development of the technique of free association. See also dream analysis , fundamental rule of psychoanalysis . Compare directed...

Cognitive-Behavioral Theory in Sport and Performance Psychology

Cognitive-Behavioral Theory in Sport and Performance Psychology   Reference library

Faye F. Didymus

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology

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Current Version:
2019

...of depression and, hence, build acceptance of the approach among the medical community. Surprisingly, these experiments provided little validation for psychoanalysis and, thus, Beck began to explore other understandings of depression. Alongside his experiments, Beck became increasingly aware that the depressed patients with whom he worked showed limited signs of internally focused hostility (i.e., depression as described by psychoanalysts) but, rather, signs of defectiveness, depression, and loss (see Beck, 2011 ). Using these observations and the...

Anxiety and Fear in Sport and Performance

Anxiety and Fear in Sport and Performance   Reference library

Shuge Zhang, Tim Woodman, and Ross Roberts

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology

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Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019

...responses . Psychology of Sport and Exercise , 2 , 89–101. Freud, S. (1920). A general introduction to psychoanalysis . New York, NY: Boni & Liveright. Gallicchio, G. , Cooke, A. , & Ring, C. (2016). Lower left temporal–frontal connectivity characterizes expert and accurate performance: High-alpha T7–Fz connectivity as a marker of conscious processing during movement . Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology , 5 , 14–24. Gaudreau, P. (2015). Self-assessment of the four subtypes of perfectionism in the 2×2 model of perfectionism . ...

Religion And Science

Religion And Science   Reference library

Ronald L. Numbers

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the History of American Science, Medicine, and Technology

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Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... Bozeman, Theodore Dwight . Protestants in an Age of Science: The Baconian Ideal and Antebellum American Religious Thought . Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1977. Burnham, John C. “The Encounter of Christian Theology with Deterministic Psychology and Psychoanalysis.” Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic 49 (1985): 321–352. Croce, Paul Jerome . Science and Religion in the Era of William James . Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1995. Dain, Bruce . A Hideous Monster of the Mind: American Race Theory in the Early Republic...

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