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foolscap

A size of paper, about 330 x 200 (or 400) mm. It is said to be named from a former watermark representing a fool's cap.

foolscap

foolscap   Reference library

A Dictionary of English Manuscript Terminology 1450–2000

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, History
Length:
93 words

... Foolscap is a long sheet of paper characterized by a watermark in the shape of a fool's or jester's cap, with its triangular points and bells. The paper varies in size, but, from the fourteenth century onwards, a foolscap sheet was likely to measure approximately 16–18 inches (41–46 cm) in length by 12–13½ inches (30.5–34.5 cm) in width. The term was subsequently applied to the long folio size of paper traditionally associated with that watermark (whether a watermark was actually present or not) e.g. Oxford pads and long typing...

foolscap

foolscap   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Weights, Measures, and Units

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

... paper and printing . British A paper size , being that with the full sheet of 13.5 in × 17 in (342.9 mm × 431.8 mm), but used in UK also to mean specifically the folio (i.e. half) of this, being 8.5 in × 13.5 in, else 13 in (215.9 mm × 342.9 mm, else 330.2 mm) see also legal size...

foolscap

foolscap   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
88 words

... Obsolete size of sheet used for writing, drawing, printing, and wrapping papers, measuring between 15×12.75in. (38.1×32.4cm) and 18.5×14.5in. (47×36.8cm), with many named sub-variants. The name is thought to originate from the use of a jester’s head, complete with cap and bells, as the *watermark ; as such it is the clearest example of a watermark being used to name a sheet size. By 1795 in England, this watermark had been supplanted by that of Britannia, or in some cases by the lion rampant. Daven Christopher Chamberlain...

foolscap

foolscap   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

... ; fool's cap . Foolscap is a size of paper (around 13½ by 17 inches), so called because 17th-century papermakers used a fool's cap as their watermark. A fool's cap is either (1) the hat once worn by court jesters, with three peaks, each tipped with a bell; or (2) the conical hat formerly put on dull pupils or, notably, on political dissidents in Maoist China. In sense 2, it's also called a dunce cap or dunce's cap...

foolscap

foolscap   Reference library

Fowler’s Dictionary of Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...foolscap , a size of folio writing- or printing-paper of a kind that originally bore a watermark representing a fool’s cap. The old spelling fool’s-cap has long since been discarded. Inevitably, the word is sometimes misspelt * fullscap...

foolscap

foolscap   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

... a size of paper, about 330 x 200 (or 400) mm. It is said to be named from a former watermark representing a fool's...

foolscap

foolscap   Quick reference

New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
104 words

... • bap , cap, chap, clap, crap, dap, entrap, enwrap, flap, frap, gap, giftwrap, hap, Jap, knap, lap, Lapp, map, nap, nappe, pap, rap, sap, schappe, scrap, slap, snap, strap, tap, trap, wrap, yap, zap • stopgap • mayhap • mishap • madcap • blackcap • redcap • kneecap • handicap • nightcap , whitecap • snowcap , toecap • foolscap • hubcap • skullcap • dunce cap • handclap • dewlap • mudflap • thunderclap • burlap • bitmap • catnap • kidnap • Saranwrap • mantrap • claptrap • deathtrap • chinstrap • jockstrap • mousetrap • bootstrap • suntrap...

10 Paper

10 Paper   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
6,008 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
2

...heads and hands, keys and pottery; animals, including mythological beasts; and flora and images from nature. Eventually, some items from the second category, depicting human creativity, became synonymous with various paper sizes: beakers and pots ( *pot ), and the fool’s cap ( *foolscap ). By the era of machine-manufactured watermarks, only these images were commonly in use. Some decades later, the trademark was devised: manufacturers, stationers, and latterly customers, introduced named grades of paper to the marketplace, the most famous being Conqueror from...

legal size

legal size   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Weights, Measures, and Units

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...size paper and printing . North America A sheet of 8.5 in × 13.5 else 13 in (215.9 mm × 342.9 else 330.2 mm). See foolscap...

chancery

chancery   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
34 words

...Obsolete paper sheet size used specifically in legal establishments, being nominally double *foolscap 26.5×16.5in. (67.3×41.9cm), of a cream colour, and with a wove finish. Known also as judicature. Daven Christopher Chamberlain...

Hergesheimer, Joseph

Hergesheimer, Joseph (1880–1954)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Writers and their Works (3 ed.)

... Java Head ( 1919 ) Fiction Linda Condon ( 1919 ) Fiction Cytherea ( 1922 ) Fiction Balisand ( 1924 ) Fiction Tampico ( 1926 ) Fiction Swords and Roses ( 1929 ) Fiction The Limestone Tree ( 1931 ) Fiction Tropical Winter ( 1933 ) Fiction The Foolscap Rose ( 1934 ) ...

pot

pot   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
69 words

...measuring between 15×12.5in. (38.1×31.8cm) to 17.25×14.25in. (43.8×36.2cm), with many named sub-variants. It was the smallest of the uncut handmade sizes, with a name that probably derived from the use of a pot or tankard as a *watermark , in the same way as *crown and *foolscap were so named. Daven Christopher Chamberlain...

sheet, size of

sheet, size of   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
120 words

...size of The lateral dimensions of a paper sheet. These became standardized to a relatively limited number of named, accepted size ranges, whose origins are mostly lost in history; such as *pot , *demy , *foolscap , *imperial , *median , *royal , and *chancery . They were further extended by the use of prefixes such as double-, quarto-, or *quad - (multipliers that scaled the basic sheet-size up or down). In the early 20 th century a new range of sizes was developed in Germany, eventually becoming the *A sizes . These have very closely controlled...

twins

twins   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
234 words
Illustration(s):
1

...specifically to its placement within a sheet, or relative to *chain lines , shape, size, and points of attachment. These differences can be useful in securing the provenance and dating of paper sheets. See also watermark identification. Drawings of two late 17 th -century *foolscap *watermarks that are twins : the *sewing dots are visible on the *chain lines . Line drawing by Chartwell Illustrators Daven Christopher Chamberlain A. H. Stevenson , ‘ Watermarks are Twins ’, SB 4 (1951–2),...

watermarks

watermarks   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Western Art

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
533 words

...In laid papers the watermark image is usually centred within one half of the sheet and, by the 18th century, was generally indicative of a particular sheet size: Posthorn (Post or Large Post), Fleur-de-Lys (different designs for Demy, Medium, Imperial), Britannia (Foolscap, Double Foolscap, etc.). The watermark is often accompanied by a countermark, centred in the other half of the sheet, which consists of the maker's name, initials, and often a date. Watermarks in wove papers are usually found along the bottom edge of the sheet, either centred or in the...

Hergesheimer, Joseph

Hergesheimer, Joseph (1880–1954)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to American Literature (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Literature
Length:
319 words

...Indies and recalling an incident in Cuba during the Spanish-American War, Balisand ( 1924 ), dealing with post-Revolutionary Virginia, Tampico ( 1926 ), a romance set in Mexico, The Limestone Tree ( 1931 ), concerned with Kentucky pioneers and their descendants, and The Foolscap Rose ( 1934 ), describing the rise to power of a Pennsylvania family. The Happy End ( 1919 ) is a book of short stories, of which the best known is “ Tol'able David .” Hergesheimer also wrote San Cristóbal de la Habaña ( 1920 ), sketches of the Cuban city; Quiet Cities (...

letterhead

letterhead   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
301 words

...saw the ascendancy of the corporate logo and integrated typographical designs for all the printed matter used and distributed by a firm. With the advent of the international *A sizes of paper in Europe, standardization replaced a range of earlier formats (e.g. *quarto , *foolscap ) that had also helped to make a business’s printed stationery distinctive. Michael F. Suarez, S.J. G. Hudson , The Design and Printing of Ephemera (2008) P. Pickard , ‘ The History of the Letterhead ’, Printing Review , 75 (1957), 5–20 M. Rickards , Encyclopedia of...

watermark

watermark   Reference library

A Dictionary of English Manuscript Terminology 1450–2000

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, History
Length:
310 words

...urns) are so common as to be virtually indistinguishable, watermarks were originally used as trade marks, and many found in early modern paper can denote, or be associated with, particular manufacturers, as well as with particular places and dates. Certain watermarks, such as a foolscap or post horn, were also used to distinguish particular paper sizes. The range of watermark designs in hand-made paper is vast, ranging from simple lettering or geometrical shapes, through figures such as animals, birds, flowers, insects, horns, and croziers, to elaborate...

paper-bag cookery

paper-bag cookery   Reference library

Tom Jaine

The Oxford Companion to Food (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

...dishes, stews and vegetables, even soufflés—had no other container than the paper. It was a development of the French method of cooking en papillote , favoured particularly for fish such as red mullet, veal chops (perhaps the classic), and small birds. These would be wrapped in foolscap paper first brushed with fat. Usually meat had been first browned, though fish would not be, and the point of the wrapping was to steam the main item with aromatics and vegetables without loss of the juices. Paper bag cookery was more ambitious. Meat did not need preliminary...

Fool

Fool   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...bowmen, ‘bolt’ being the arrow of a crossbow. The good soldier shoots with a purpose, the foolish soldier at random. A fool uttereth all his mind: but a wise man keepeth it in till afterwards. Fool’s cap A conical cap with feather and bells, such as licensed fools used to wear. Foolscap Properly the jester’s cap and bells or the conical paper hat of a dunce . The former standard size of printing paper measuring 13½ x 17in (343 x 432mm) and of writing paper measuring 13¼ x 16½ in (337 x 419mm) took their name from an ancient watermark showing a fool’s head and...

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