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foolscap

A size of paper, about 330 x 200 (or 400) mm. It is said to be named from a former watermark representing a fool's cap.

watermarks

watermarks   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Western Art

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
533 words

...In laid papers the watermark image is usually centred within one half of the sheet and, by the 18th century, was generally indicative of a particular sheet size: Posthorn (Post or Large Post), Fleur-de-Lys (different designs for Demy, Medium, Imperial), Britannia (Foolscap, Double Foolscap, etc.). The watermark is often accompanied by a countermark, centred in the other half of the sheet, which consists of the maker's name, initials, and often a date. Watermarks in wove papers are usually found along the bottom edge of the sheet, either centred or in the...

Schön, Erhard

Schön, Erhard (c.1491)   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Northern Renaissance Art

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
1,253 words

... p encz. He satirized human nature, notably man's folly and the battle between the sexes, in his Four Properties of Wine ( c. 1528 ; b . 177), the Mountain of Lies ( 1533 ; b . 166), Twelve Traits of a Wicked Wife ( c. 1530 ; b . 182) and the undated Distribution of Foolscaps ( b . 189), examples of his collaboration with Hans Sachs. Some woodcuts, such as his Peasant Wedding ( 1527 ; b . 173), focused on the gluttony and failings of the peasant class. His secular woodcuts covered a broad thematic range. For example, in the aftermath of the...

paper

paper   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Western Art

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
1,081 words

...were made from intrinsically pure materials: rags derived from linen and cotton, old hemp ropes, and sailcloth. Paper was traditionally made in a range of sizes based on local measurements that varied slightly from country to country: the most common artists' papers sizes were: Foolscap (16½×13½ in), Crown (19×15 in), Demy (20×15½ in), Large Post (21×16½ in), Royal (24×19 in), Super Royal (27½×19½ in), Imperial (30×22 in), Colombier (34½×23½ in), Atlas (34×26 in), and Antiquarian (53×31 in). Some of these sizes are still available in handmade and mould-made...

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