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Gurzil Dispels the Darkness

Subject: Religion

(Libya) Gurzil, the sun god, was worshiped among the Huwwara of Tripolitania well into the eleventh century, long after the Arab conquest. This deity was a protector, a guide, ...

Gurzil Dispels the Darkness

Gurzil Dispels the Darkness  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(Libya)Gurzil, the sun god, was worshiped among the Huwwara of Tripolitania well into the eleventh century, long after the Arab conquest. This deity was a protector, a guide, and a dispeller of ...
parātmasamatā

parātmasamatā (T.)   Reference library

The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

...of his Bodhicaryāvatāra , Śāntideva , drawing apparently on the Tathāgataguhyasūtra , explains that there is no reason to cherish oneself over others, because both oneself and others equally wish for happiness and equally wish to avoid suffering. If suffering is to be dispelled, it should be done without distinguishing whether that suffering is experienced by oneself or by another sentient being. This equalizing of self and other is considered a prerequisite for the “exchange of self and other” ( parātmaparivartana...

Mahānidānasutta

Mahānidānasutta (C.)   Reference library

The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

...In Pāli, the “Great Discourse on Causality”; the fifteenth sutta of the Dīghanikāya (a separate Dharmaguptaka recension appears as the thirteenth sūtra in the Chinese translation of the Dīrghāgama ); preached by the Buddha to Ānanda in the market town of Kammāsadhamma to dispel his wrong view that the doctrine of dependent origination ( P. paṭiccasamuppāda ; S. pratītyasamutpāda ) only appears to be profound. He then gives an exposition of dependent origination as a tenfold causal chain (rather than the typical twelvefold chain, dropping the first...

upādhyāya

upādhyāya (P.)   Reference library

The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

...and, as necessary, to supply him with requisites, such as robes and an alms bowl. He should tend to his disciple if he is ill and discipline him if he commits some wrongdoing. If the disciple should begin to entertain doubts about the religion, the preceptor should try to dispel them. If the disciple should commit a grave offense against the monastic rules and regulations, the preceptor is to prevail upon him to go before the saṃgha to seek expiation. If the disciple misbehaves or becomes disobedient, the preceptor is enjoined to expel him. But if the...

Sammohavinodanī

Sammohavinodanī   Reference library

The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

...Sammohavinodanī . In Pāli, “The Dispeller of Delusion,” a commentary by the influential Pāli scholar Buddhaghosa on the Vibhaṅga , the second book of the Pāli abhidhammapiṭaka . This work covers much of the same material found in Buddhaghosa’s Visuddhimagga , which is thought to be the earlier of the two works. In his introduction to Sammohavinodanī , Buddhaghosa claims to have drawn his analysis from more ancient commentaries. The work is divided into eighteen sections, beginning with an exposition on the five aggregates ( P. khandha , S. skandha )....

antevāsika

antevāsika (T.)   Reference library

The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

...alms bowl, cleaning his residence, accompanying him on journeys, attending him when he is sick, and so forth. As part of his responsibilities toward the teacher, if the teacher should begin to entertain doubts about the doctrine or his ability to practice, the pupil is to try to dispel them. If the teacher should commit a grave offense against the rules of the saṃgha, the pupil is supposed to try to prevail upon his teacher to go before the saṃgha to receive its judgment. An antevāsika requires the permission of his ācariya to attend to others, to accompany...

ācariya

ācariya (S.)   Reference library

The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

...requisites, such as robes ( see tricīvara ) and alms bowl ( pātra ). He should tend to him if he is ill and discipline him if he commits wrongdoing. If the pupil should begin to entertain doubts about the dispensation or his abilities to practice, the teacher must try to dispel them. If the pupil should commit a grave offense against the rules of the saṃgha , the teacher is to prevail upon him to go before the saṃgha to seek expiation. If the pupil misbehaves or is disobedient, the teacher is enjoined to expel him. But if the pupil shows remorse and...

Kindī, Abū Yūsuf Yaʿqūb ibn Isḥāq al-

Kindī, Abū Yūsuf Yaʿqūb ibn Isḥāq al-   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Islamic World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

...to illustrious Arab tribes. Among his important works are Fī al-falsafa al-ūlā (On First Philosophy), concerning his views on metaphysics; Fī hudūd al-ashāaʿ wa-rusūmihā (On the Definitions and Descriptions of Things); and Fī al-ḥīla li-Daf   ʿ al-aḥzān (On the Device for Dispelling Sorrows). The ninth century saw a phenomenal rise in abstract thought among the Arabs, where previously there had been only recitations of poetry and battle descriptions: in the science of history and theology ( kalām) , as well as the beginnings of philosophy. According to the...

Vajrakīlaya

Vajrakīlaya (T.)   Reference library

The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

...concerning this deity were brought to China in the eighth century by Amoghavajra , but this identification is disputed. Vajrakīlaya is wrathful, with three faces with three eyes each, and six or more hands holding various instruments in addition to the kīla. He is said to dispel obstacles to progress on the path to enlightenment and to the swift attainment of both mundane and supramundane...

Shuiyue Guanyin

Shuiyue Guanyin (J.)   Reference library

The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

... that is frequently depicted in East Asian art. The name of this bodhisattva derives from this image’s most characteristic feature: a luminous disk that encircles the bodhisattva and evokes both a nimbus ( see kāyaprabhā ) and a full moon, effectively suggesting its power to dispel the darkness of the night. Another connotation is indicated in texts such as the Dazhidu lun (* Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra ), where the term “moon in the water” connotes that all phenomena are like reflections of the moon on the surface of the water, thereby signifying...

Ma ṇi bka’ ’bum

Ma ṇi bka’ ’bum   Reference library

The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

...According to the Tibetan text, the Tibetan king Srong bstan sgam po dispatched a monk named Akaraśīla to southern Nepal, where he discovered the four images in the midst of a large sandalwood grove. Akaraśīla then “invited” the statues to reside in various locations in order to dispel misery and strife and serve as the basis for religious practice. These statues are considered some of the most sacred Buddhist images in Nepal and Tibet. In their most common reckoning, the four brothers are: (1) the white Matsyendranāth in Jana Bāhāl, Kathmandu, Nepal; (2) the...

Gayā-Kāśyapa

Gayā-Kāśyapa (P.)   Reference library

The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

...the Buddha performed numerous magical feats to demonstrate his mastery of iddhi (S. ṛddhi ), including subduing a fire serpent ( nāga ) without being burned, a scene depicted in Indian rock carvings. Using his ability to read Uruvilvā-Kāśyapa’s mind, the Buddha was able to dispel his view that he was an arahant and converted him and his disciples. As part of their conversion, they shaved off their long locks and threw them in the river. When Uruvilvā-Kāśyapa’s younger brothers Gayā-Kāśyapa and Nadī-Kāśyapa saw all the hair floating downstream, they came...

Khri srong lde btsan

Khri srong lde btsan (754–799)   Reference library

The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

...in order to bestow a special teaching. According to tradition, at the time of his death, Śāntarakṣita warned in his final testament that a mistaken philosophical view would become established in Tibet and advised the king to invite Kamalaśīla to come to Tibet in order to dispel it. The view was apparently that of the Northen Chan ( Bei zong ) monk Heshang Moheyan, who had developed a following at the Tibetan court. Kamalaśīla was invited and a debate was held between the Indian monk and the Chinese monk, with the king serving as judge. It is unclear...

Naicker, E.V. Ramaswamy (Periyar)

Naicker, E.V. Ramaswamy (Periyar) (1879)   Reference library

Jesudas M. Athyal

The Oxford Encyclopaedia of South Asian Christianity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012

...his insistence on a rational outlook to bring about intellectual emancipation and a healthy world view. It was in this context that the Self-Respect Movement, founded in 1925 , carried on a vigorous and ceaseless propaganda against superstitions and traditions. Periyar wanted to dispel the ignorance of the people and make them enlightened. He exhorted them to take steps to change the institutions and values that led to meaningless divisions and unjust discrimination. He advised people to change according to the requirements of the changing times and keep pace...

Kamalaśīla

Kamalaśīla (T.)   Reference library

The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

..., he founded Bsam yas , the first Buddhist monastery in Tibet. According to tradition, at the time of his death Śāntarakṣita warned that a mistaken philosophical view would become established in Tibet and advised the king to invite Kamalaśīla to come to Tibet in order to dispel it. This mistaken view was apparently that of Heshang Moheyan , a Northern Chan ( Bei zong ) monk who had developed a following at the Tibetan court. Kamalaśīla was invited, and a debate was held between the Indian monk and his Chinese counterpart, with the king serving as...

Christian Jatharas in the Telangana Region of Andhra Pradesh

Christian Jatharas in the Telangana Region of Andhra Pradesh   Reference library

Chilkuri Vasantha rao

The Oxford Encyclopaedia of South Asian Christianity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012

...cross, which is invariably done by the bishopamma. The women, dressed in white holding indigenous earthen lamps, gather around the wooden cross, which is erected in front of the church. The bishopamma gives an exhortation, stressing that Jesus Christ is the light of the world, dispelling darkness from every situation and from every heart who believes in Him. With prayer, she then lights a lamp. From her lamp, the women then light their lamps, circumambulate around the cross and then place their lamps on the cross. Some women continue pouring oil in the lamps...

Shuʿūbīyah

Shuʿūbīyah   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Islamic World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion, Social sciences, Regional and Area Studies
Length:
1,862 words

...is crucial in the way it looks at tafsīr (Qurʿānic exegesis) as a new source for the study of the Shuʿūbīyah movement, where locality, rather than lineage or language, emerges as a basic trait for self-identification of the proponents of the Shuʿūbīyah. Furthermore, Mottahedeh dispels any lingering notion of the Shuʿūbīyah's historical connection to modern Iranian nationalism. Norris, H. T. “Shuʿūbīyah in Arabic Literature.” In The Cambridge History of Arabic Literature . vol. 4: ʿAbbāsid Belles-Lettres, edited by Julia Ashtiany , pp. 32–47. Cambridge, U.K.,...

Birth Rites

Birth Rites   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Islamic World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion, Social sciences, Regional and Area Studies
Length:
2,513 words

...of incantations are utilized to free the child, including the names of the “Five” (Muḥammad, ʿAlī, Fāṭimah, Ḥasan, and Ḥusayn); such an incantation is held to be ʿāṭil wa bāṭil (offensive and defensive). In Lebanon, about one-third of Sunnīs utilize incense or fumigation to dispel evil from a newborn infant; in the latter practice, incense obtained from a shaykh is thrown into an open fire, and the child is passed through the fumes three (or seven) times while an incantation or prayer is recited. Other villagers in Lebanon believe there are special powers...

Agriculture

Agriculture   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Islamic World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion, Social sciences, Regional and Area Studies
Length:
3,621 words
Illustration(s):
1

...of the agricultural sectors in the Tropical Asian countries, particularly in Bangladesh and Indonesia, where huge increases in population have created enormous economic and nutritional pressures. The specter of mass hunger caused by insufficient land resources has been dispelled by the so-called Green Revolution brought about by new, higher-yielding rice technologies. Rice yields indeed increased in Bangladesh by 47 percent per hectare between 1961–1965 and 1987–1991 , and in the same period by 133 percent in Indonesia. In both countries the area of...

Queer Readings

Queer Readings   Reference library

Stuart Macwilliam

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Bible and Gender Studies

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion, Social sciences, Sociology
Length:
5,346 words

...must not be pushed too far. Indeed, when one considers queer theory’s suspicion of binaries, it would be ironic to entangle it in a new one. A suspicion that inward-looking uses of queer are merely a continuation of lesbian and gay treatments of the biblical texts may well be dispelled when the far wider range of minorities covered by the term “queer” is borne in mind; in this understanding heterosexual does not necessarily mean heteronormative, and what Robert E. Goss calls “gay normativity” ( 2002 , p. 229) is at odds with queer. And for their part, queer...

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