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Overview

caryatid

A carved female figure, usually clad in long robes, serving as a column. They were first used in Greek architecture and the most famous caryatids are on the Erechtheum at Athens (c.421–406 ...

Elephants

Elephants   Reference library

The Encyclopedia of Religion and Nature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Religion, Social sciences
Length:
3,385 words

...environment. Scholars feel that belief in Ganesh helped preserve elephant numbers in India and Sri Lanka, and link the rise of large-scale killing to the period of British colonial rule. Elephantine maternal strength is also represented in Hindu beliefs about female elephant caryatids supporting the Earth on their backs. The elephants rest upon a giant turtle, which stands in a pool of milk encircled by a giant snake, a further female symbol. Shri-Gaja, also called Megha (Cloud), is the Divine Elephant associated with rain, fertility, and Lakshmi, Hinduism's...

Erne

Erne   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...can be reached by bridge, containing a well-preserved, double-faced, phallic Janus figure and a smaller figure, the ‘lusty man’, so named from its origin on Lustymore Island; Devenish Island, a 6th-century monastic settlement founded by St Molaise; and White Island, containing caryatid-like standing figures of Christian and apparently pagan origin, including a sheela-na-gig . The fabled cataract of Assaroe , now flooded for a hydroelectric project, was on the Erne. See W. F. Wakeman , Lough Erne (Enniskillen, 1870); John Charles Roy , The Road Wet , the...

Art and Architecture, African

Art and Architecture, African   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Africa

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Social sciences, Regional and Area Studies, History, Regional and National History
Length:
5,164 words
Illustration(s):
3

...ceremonies and other royal events. Such stools were so politically potent that ownership alone sometimes served to signify legitimacy. The political importance of royal Luba women is reflected in the prominent depiction of these women in stools and related royal arts. One caryatid (column carved in the shape of a draped female figure) shows a woman kneeling calmly, her fingers resting on the seat of the stool. This depiction underscores the critical role that Luba women play as chieftaincy founders; it also indicates their role as contemporary political...

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