You are looking at 1-9 of 9 entries  for:

  • All: basic rest-activity cycle x
clear all

View:

Overview

basic rest-activity cycle

A biological rhythm of waxing and waning alertness with a period of approximately 90 minutes in humans. During sleep it controls the cycles of REM and slow-wave sleep. Also called the ...

Walt Whitman's Song of Myself

Walt Whitman's Song of Myself   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
7,320 words

...show Whitman for what he is one does not need to praise or explain or argue, one needs simply to quote.” Through me many long dumb voices, Voices of the interminable generations of prisoners and slaves, Voices of the diseased and despairing and of thieves and dwarfs, Voices of cycles of preparation and accretion, And of the threads that connect the stars, and of wombs and of the father stuff, And of the rights of them the others are down upon, Of the deform'd, trivial, flat, foolish, despised, Fog in the air, beetles rolling balls of dung. Nowhere, in the...

Theater in America

Theater in America   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
6,895 words

...the peak year of activity, there were 255 new productions in the Broadway theater. This might be compared with 115 in 1915–1916 or 28 in 2000–2001 . While many of these productions in the fun-seeking Jazz Age were unabashed entertainment with no literary ambitions, there was more opportunity at this time for plays with literary value to be produced than at any other time before or since. During the 1920s and 1930s, realism was the dominant aesthetic on the American stage. When one considers the dominance of Broadway over the rest of the country, and the...

Objectivism (Reznikoff, Zukofsky, Oppen)

Objectivism (Reznikoff, Zukofsky, Oppen)   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
7,227 words

...much of his life bitter that he was not more widely published, even as he continued to produce obscure, arcane books—450-page volumes of Shakespeare criticism, transliterations of medieval Italian poetry—that could hardly be expected to attract a wide audience. This perpetual cycle of production and rejection was the engine that propelled Zukofsky throughout his life, even as it ultimately reduced him to a reclusive hypochondriac. For better or for worse, his hero Ezra Pound served him as a model until the end. As Pound was the high priest of...

Whitman, Walt

Whitman, Walt   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
10,740 words

...the earth.” Song of Myself was ultimately divided into fifty-two sections, and there are nearly as many different theories as to its thematic organization and structure. Probably the most satisfying is one of the simplest: that the poem is analogous to a symphony with a musical cycle full of crescendos and climaxes. In one of the more complex theories, the poet merges mystically with all life and experience during the first eighteen sections, then defines the self in transcendentalist terms in which parts of nature are seemingly insignificant but actually...

Novels in French. Beginnings to 1900

Novels in French. Beginnings to 1900   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Canadian Literature (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature
Length:
20,973 words

...sometimes they die surrounded, like the hero of Et puis tout est silence… ( 1965 ; The rest is silence , 1965 ), caught in the timbers of a fallen-down barn. There are similarities here with the position of the dying imprisoned engineer in Yves Thériault 's Cul-de-sac ( 1961 ) who is caught in the dead-end of a nervous breakdown, looking over his past. Besides dealing with repossession of the land, the novel became preoccupied with the language in which this activity is given expression. Prior to the sixties, fictional heroes tended to be dreamers...

Steinbeck, John

Steinbeck, John   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
8,619 words

...in his last novel, The Winter of Our Discontent . As apprentice works foreshadowing Steinbeck's future artistry, Cup of Gold and To a God Unknown deserve a great deal more critical attention, as do The Pastures of Heaven and Tortilla Flat , which are really short-story cycles bound by strands of place, theme, tone, and character. Pastures , one of Steinbeck's most lyrical novels, focuses on the inhabitants of a beautiful valley whose lives are affected, often negatively, by their contact with the well-meaning Munroe family. Tortilla Flat , the...

Drama in French. The beginnings to 1900

Drama in French. The beginnings to 1900   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Canadian Literature (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature
Length:
17,432 words

...Doucette , Theatre in French Canada: laying the foundations, 1606–1867 (1984). 1900 to 1948 (drama and theatre) 1948 to 1981 1981 to 1996 Bibliography L. E. Doucette 1900 to 1948 (drama and theatre) . While theatrical activity in French dates back a long time in Quebec, with sporadic activity elsewhere in the country, most theatrical activity in Montreal around the turn of the century has been estimated as more than 85% English. Changes in this situation, beginning in the 1890s, produced a radical turn-around in the first decade of the twentieth century. This...

Lawrence, D. H.

Lawrence, D. H.   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of British Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature
Length:
8,706 words
Illustration(s):
1

...“sex as blood-contact.” For Lawrence, the English had lost their capacity to have passionate sex; the new England that Lawrence advocates would celebrate the “phallus as a bridge to the future.” He valorizes the phallus as a ritualistic symbol that restores reverence for natural cycles. Lawrence's use of phallic symbolism can be best understood by briefly reviewing two texts that significantly contribute to Lawrence's overall vision for LCL , the travel essays Etruscan Places ( 1927 , published posthumously in 1932 ) and the novella The Escaped Cock (...

Greek Poetry

Greek Poetry   Reference library

C. J. Herington, L. Kurke, E. Keeley, and S. Gourgouris

The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies - poetry and poets
Length:
10,571 words

...and stylistic range and allows by far the freest play of fantasy. Its basic dialect is the local vernacular—colloquial Attic speech in all its vigor and explicitness, sexual and scatological. Further, the extant Aristophanic comedies display an extraordinary aptitude for the parody of every other poetic genre, not least of tragedy. But Old Comedy’s single most extraordinary feature was its total freedom to create characters and situations. In most Gr. poetry up to that time, the basic narratives and characters were drawn from the ancient myths and sagas....

View: