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bare life

Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben's concept for life that has been exposed to what he terms the structure of exception that constitutes contemporary biopower. The term originates in ...

philosophy

philosophy  

(Greek, love of knowledge or wisdom)The study of the most general and abstract features of the world and categories with which we think: mind, matter, reason, proof, truth, etc. In philosophy, the ...
mime

mime   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Classical Literature (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Classical studies
Length:
369 words

...accompaniment of music. For this see pantomime . At Rome the name was applied to a kind of dramatic performance introduced there before the end of the third century bc , perhaps from Magna Graecia . The actors included both men and women, who acted in bare feet and without masks scenes from everyday life or from romance, spoken in prose. Mime gradually ousted the Atellan farce as a tail piece or finale ( exodium ) after tragedies. It developed into licentious farce, with stock characters of husband, faithless wife, her lover, and the maid. A popular...

Bōē'thius

Bōē'thius (c. ad 476–524)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Classical Literature (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Classical studies
Length:
550 words

...39 short poems in thirteen different (and metrically accurate) metres in the style of Menippean satire ( see Menippus ). Philosophy, who ousts the Muses, comes to console the prisoner; she reminds him of the sufferings of other thinkers such as Socrates, and invites him to lay bare his troubles. Boethius describes the ingratitude with which his integrity has been met, and laments the triumph of injustice. Philosophy reminds him of the mutability of fortune and the vanity of those things which the world esteems good. The only real good is God. Boethius asks...

I'liad

I'liad (‘the Trojan poem’)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Classical Literature (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Classical studies
Length:
963 words

..., symbolizing the fall of Troy which will soon follow. The gods in Olympus are divided in their sympathies and intervene on one side or the other, or fight among themselves. Their mixture of sublimity and frivolity makes a powerful contribution to the character of the Iliad . A bare outline of events is as follows. Books 1–8. A plague has broken out in the Greek camp, and the seer Calchas declares that it has been brought about by the anger of Apollo on behalf of his priest whose daughter, Chrysēis, has been taken prisoner and given to Agamemnon as a gift of...

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