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bare life

Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben's concept for life that has been exposed to what he terms the structure of exception that constitutes contemporary biopower. The term originates in ...

philosophy

philosophy  

(Greek, love of knowledge or wisdom)The study of the most general and abstract features of the world and categories with which we think: mind, matter, reason, proof, truth, etc. In philosophy, the ...
Ayrlies

Ayrlies   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Garden

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

...Whitford, Auckland, New Zealand, a garden of 4 hectares/10 acres, was started in 1964 by its owners, Beverley and the late Malcolm McConnell. The site was bare, exposed to the elements, and poised on a gently undulating hillside facing north across the sea to the young volcanic cone of Rangitoto. The McConnells adopted a naturalistic style and, in the garden's formative years, vast quantities of soil were moved to create a series of ponds and waterways where a range of aquatic and marginal plants including the spectacular Colocasia ‘Lime Fizz’ make...

bonsai

bonsai   Reference library

Christopher M. Cochrane

The Oxford Companion to the Garden

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

...gnarled trunks contrasting with buds and flowers that can withstand snow. Winterberry ( Ilex serrata ) bonsai are attractive for their bare silhouette and bright-red berries. Symbolic of the New Year, Japanese black pines ( Pinus thunbergii ) are enhanced by deeply fissured bark that recalls long life. Stewartia monadelpha and Japanese beeches ( Fagus crenata ) are displayed for their striking smooth bark when bare, though beech also may be displayed for coppery leaves remaining in winter. Satsuki azaleas ( Rhododendron ‘Satsuki’ (EA) are grown for...

Bali

Bali   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Garden

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

...that create spectacular vistas. Mount Agung, at over 3,000 m/9,842 ft the tallest volcano, dominates the island's scenery, as well as much of its ritual life. Unlike the rest of Indonesia, which has the largest Muslim population of any country, Bali is Hindu and its culture and garden development also followed a different path. Traditional gardens are rather sparse, with one or two trees, an expanse of bare packed earth, and sometimes a few flowering shrubs. Temple and palace gardens are more complex, with elaborate water features—ponds, fountains, and...

Hampton Court Palace

Hampton Court Palace   Reference library

Patrick Taylor

The Oxford Companion to the Garden

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Society and culture, Lifestyle, Home, and garden, Art & Architecture
Length:
1,098 words
Illustration(s):
1

...clipped into their present dumpy conical shapes. In recent times incomparably the most important development has been the thoroughly researched restoration of the Privy Garden inspired by the pioneer restoration of Het Loo . In 1993 the site was cleared and excavations laid bare the original pattern of the garden. Ring counting of the old yews showed them to be the original trees. Yews and holly were propagated, so that the ancient clones could be preserved. No list survived of the original ornamental planting but contemporary lists (including two lists...

New Zealand

New Zealand   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Garden

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

...now administered by a trust set up when Cook died. Nearby is Hack Falls Arboretum (Tiniroto), containing over 2,500 taxa, including 200 species of oak, 70 of which are Mexican, many collected in the wild. Cashell (Ohoka, Christchurch) is an outstanding new garden commenced on a bare site in 1993 and designed by John Trengrove ( b. 1925 ) and Pauline Trengrove ( b. 1931 ) along architectural lines marked by hornbeam and immaculate Cupressus macrocarpa hedges. Garden rooms each side of the Palladian-style house are planted in yellow and green on one...

Egypt, ancient

Egypt, ancient   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Garden

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

...The natural landscape was not imitated or ‘domesticated’, which is not surprising in a country that consists largely of the flat floodplain with its few trees and the almost plantless desert plateaux and mountains. Another important characteristic is the lack of ground cover. Bare, unirrigated earth surrounds and defines the plants, all of which must be irrigated and intensively weeded; where there is no irrigation, only deep-rooted trees and palms grow. Representations and descriptions The oldest indication of gardening is on one of the earliest preserved...

orchard

orchard   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Garden

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

...of the dining table and banquet. Grown in the open these forms could edge paths and create avenues of delight throughout the pleasure grounds. ‘A perpetual tapestry, covered in spring with flowers, in summer and autumn with fruit and foliage, beautiful even in winter with bare branches laced together in cunning artifice,’ wrote Antoine Le Gendre , the French pioneer of fruit training, whose instructions were translated into English as The Manner of Ordering Fruit Trees ( 1655 ). By the end of the century, not only were orchards very much in evidence...

China

China   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Garden

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

...devices for entertaining imperial guests. These included a unique collection of mechanical figures, 60 cm/24 in high and sumptuously dressed, which sailed in boats along specially constructed channels to perform 72 scenes from Chinese history. A report describes the park's bare trees in winter decked out with silk flowers; in summer its real lotus flowers were increased by artificial flowers ‘constantly renewed’. A ‘million’ people reportedly worked to create this park, of which one in five was said to have died in the process. Destroyed in the rebellion...

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