You are looking at 1-20 of 165 entries  for:

  • All: bare life x
  • Language reference x
clear all

View:

Overview

bare life

Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben's concept for life that has been exposed to what he terms the structure of exception that constitutes contemporary biopower. The term originates in ...

Pronouns

Pronouns   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
1,916 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...form because of that interchangeability. But me is much more common today in a sentence like that one. Ernest Gowers gave sound advice here: “The prepositional use of than is now so common colloquially ( He is older than me; they travelled much faster than us ) that the bare subjective pronoun in such a position strikes the readers as pedantic, and it is better either to give it a more natural appearance by supplying it with a verb or to dodge the difficulty by not using an inflective pronoun at all” ( FMEU2 at 620). Following are several good...

Prepositions

Prepositions   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
2,035 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

... 164, 167 ( 1950 ). • “The peculiarities of legal English are often used as a stick to beat the official with .” Ernest Gowers , Plain Words: Their ABC 13 ( 1954 ). • “In the structure of the ‘coherent sentence,’ such particles are necessary, and, strip the sentence as bare as you will, they cannot be entirely dispensed with .” G.H. Vallins , The Best English 30 ( 1960 ). • “Poetry, as Dr. Johnson said, is untranslatable and hence, if it is good, preserves the language it is written in .” Anthony Burgess , A Mouthful of Air 156 ( 1992 ). • ...

Phrasal Adjectives

Phrasal Adjectives   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
2,154 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...to launch Dimension Films, a division devoted to the revenue-producing horror- and teen-movie market.” Ken Auletta , “Beauty and the Beast,” New Yorker , 16 Dec. 2002 , at 65, 75. • “It was a four- or five-times-a-year indulgence, if that.” Arthur Miller , “The Bare Manuscript,” New Yorker , 16 Dec. 2002 , at 82, 85. Occasionally writers omit the hyphens, resulting almost invariably in readers’ puzzlement—e.g.: “They lived in the small city of Apopka, Florida, located in the fern and foliage growing region [read instead in the fern- and...

Punctuation

Punctuation   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
7,703 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...anniversary.” Victor Erofeyev , “The Russian God,” New Yorker , 16 Dec. 2002 , at 56. • “She tried not to think that all his verses about her—the sonnets, the villanelles, the haiku—were merely ploys to prepare her for this ridiculous rubber balloon.” Arthur Miller , “The Bare Manuscript,” New Yorker , 16 Dec. 2002 , at 82, 86. Sometimes, perhaps as a result of an ill-founded prejudice against dashes, writers try to make commas function in their place. Often this doesn't work. In fact, the commas can result in a comma splice (one of two types of ...

spartan

spartan   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
308 words

...life on the prairie> . E.g.: “He doesn't like the idea of Elke entering his home and seeing how bare he keeps it, how spartan his life is.” Donna Jo Napoli & Richard Tchen , Spinners 85 ( 1999 ). The word sparse means “not densely packed; scattered” <sparse trees on the plain> <a sparsely populated area> . Undoubtedly through mistaken sound-association, people have begun misusing sparse for spartan —e.g.: • “It is to be her retirement home, so she takes only a few of her worldly possessions and intends to live a sparse [read spartan ] life.”...

Durkheim, Émile

Durkheim, Émile (1858–1917)   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Semiotics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Language reference, Linguistics
Length:
1,443 words

...form of social discipline. This line of inquiry reaches its fullest development in Durkheim's last book, The Elementary Forms of the Religious Life ( 1912 ). As in the earlier work, the emphasis is upon what Durkheim considers the simplest societies. In one sense, these societies offered the perfect testing grounds for a theory of society in general, since the basic forms would presumably be most clearly laid bare in these cultures that lack the accretions of many layers of cultural evolution. However, as a class Durkheim saw them as sui generis, since they...

interactionist analysis

interactionist analysis   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Semiotics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Language reference, Linguistics
Length:
1,757 words

...Blum and McHugh present a theorization of self‐reflection irreducible to a descriptive inventory of this practice's historic conventions in the human sciences. Since self‐reflection is the very condition of the existence and development of the human sciences, Blum and McHugh lay bare the ground of their inquiry by constructing an ideal speaker. Their idealized version of self‐reflection as rational, social action is the limit toward which their inquiry is oriented. Self‐reflection is for them a social action undertaken by an ideal speaker or theorist in...

Form of Address

Form of Address   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to the English Language (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Language reference, History of English, Linguistics
Length:
1,919 words

...be used at all; forms of address tend instead to be terms of endearment ( baby, darling, honey ) or expressions of derision ( dickhead, idiot, stupid ), usually hostile and dismissive, but sometimes affectionate. At the impersonal end, such forms of address as sir and titles (bare or with surname) may be used: Excuse me, sir/Sir ; Doctor ( Kildare ), do you have a moment, please? ; Follow your orders, Captain ( Bligh ). All the forms of address discussed below occur at various points on this continuum. Names and titles With the loss of its th -forms...

Peirce, Charles Sanders

Peirce, Charles Sanders (1839–1914)   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Semiotics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Language reference, Linguistics
Length:
3,728 words

...Peirce also introduced his Harvard audience to the most recent variants of his metaphysical vocabulary of triadic forms: Thing, Representation, and Form; and Signs, Copies, and Symbols. By Form , he referred to the way in which a thing can be represented, while a thing was the bare “it” of the representation, and “representations” were unities of Thing and Form insofar as they have singular identities, as do Things, but also refer beyond themselves to Things themselves. Representations are always known directly because there is nothing to know about them...

Lacan, Jacques

Lacan, Jacques (1901–1981)   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Semiotics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Language reference, Linguistics
Length:
3,413 words

...pure signified, purged of all mediation through the signifier. What analysands can access, through the circulation of certain signifiers between themselves and the analyst, is a sense of an earlier attachment of a signifier to a signified. These attachments are for Lacan a kind of bare minimum for psychic survival. They are points where the flux of meaning is held in place so that human beings can preserve their sanity. Thus, while Lacan's concept of the signifying chain appeared to promise a psycholinguistic theory of infinite semiosis, the idea of the points...

existential

existential   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of English Grammar (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
314 words

...There must be a God There seems to be no solution These are called bare existential clauses , which do not have a non-existential counterpart (cf. An emergency is ). An extended existential clause contains additional material (called the extension ), such as a locative ( 1 ) or temporal phrase, a relative clause, a to -infinitive , or an ‐ing clause : There is a mouse in the loft There was a fire last week There has been nothing in the papers about this Can there be life on other planets? There’s one student who brings her dog to class There...

Poetry

Poetry   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Rhetoric

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Language reference, Linguistics
Length:
6,213 words

...the ways in which they use the patterns and resources of language. For this reason, discussions of the figures are often absorbed into manuals for writing poetry. Rhetoric also encourages analysis of the structure of speeches and poems. Since poems do not usually conform to the bare four-part structure of the classical oration, rhetoricians and commentators are obliged to analyze the functioning of different types of structure peculiar to individual poems, as Dante did in the Vita Nuova ( c.1292 ), commenting on the divisions of a number of his youthful...

Iconography

Iconography   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Rhetoric

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Language reference, Linguistics
Length:
4,548 words
Illustration(s):
3

...In the longest, she is symbolized by a beautiful young woman, because the ancients depicted Mercury as young, pleasing, and beardless. Eloquence wears a golden crown over a helmet, a breastplate, and sword over a purple dress; her arms are bare; in her right hand she holds a staff and in her left a thunderbolt. The bare arms signify the delicacy of her words, whereas the armor indicates the foundation of reason and knowledge without which eloquence is weak and helpless. The thunderbolt, deriving from Demosthenes' epithet, alludes to the sublime force of...

know

know   Quick reference

Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010

...bread is buttered: see bread . know someone in the biblical sense have sex with someone. informal, humorous Know in this sense is an old use which is particularly associated with language in the Bible, e.g. Genesis 4:1: And Adam knew Eve his wife; and she conceived, and bare Cain'. know someone or something inside out: see inside out . know something like the back of your hand: see back . know the ropes be thoroughly acquainted with the way in which something is done. informal In its literal sense, this expression goes back to the days of...

four

four   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

...from the 1920s. four noble truths the four central beliefs containing the essence of Buddhist teaching; they are that human life is characterized by frustration and suffering, that the cause of this is desire and greed, that desire must therefore be got rid of, and that following the eightfold path is the way to achieve this. see also four-leaved clover , First Four Ships at first , there is more to marriage than four bare legs in a bed , the four winds at wind...

Yeats, W[illiam] B[utler]

Yeats, W[illiam] B[utler] (1865–1939)   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Irish Phrase & Fable

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

...resting-place, as anticipated in his epitaph in Last Poems ( 1939 ), by which time he was celebrated even by late detractors as a great Irishman and a towering literary figure: Under bare Ben Bulben's head In Drumcliff churchyard Yeats is laid … No marble, no conventional phrase, On limestone quarried near the spot By his command these words are cut: Cast a cold eye On life, on death. Horseman, pass...

veil

veil   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
156 words

...cloth separating the innermost sanctuary from the rest of the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem. The idea soon developed of this cloth representing a barrier between this life and the unknown state of existence after death, giving rise to the current phrase. To draw a veil over something dates from the early 18th century, and is the opposite of reveal [LME] which comes from Latin revelare ‘lay bare’ in the sense of ‘lifting the...

know

know   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
205 words

...in the book of Genesis: ‘And Adam knew Eve his wife; and she conceived, and bare Cain.’ To know the ropes is to be thoroughly acquainted with the way in which something is done. The phrase comes from the days of sailing ships, when skill in handling ropes was essential for any sailor—an alternative is know their onions . The ancients valued self-knowledge as the way to wisdom—inscribed on the Greek temple of Apollo at Delphi were the words know thyself . The line ‘ It's life, Jim, but not as we know it ’ is the mainstay of anyone trying to do an...

construct

construct   Reference library

Fowler’s Dictionary of Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
330 words

...to seminaries of learning’. The main stress was moved to the second syllable at some indeterminable point in the first half of the 20c. 4 Examples of the commonest uses of construe : He could not construe the simplest German poem without the help of a translation —M. Baring, 1924 ; His life could be construed…as a series of delinquent approaches to virtue —V. S. Pritchett, 1980 ; She said nothing to me which could not be construed as loyal admiration —P. Ackroyd, 1983 ; He asked his interrogators to specify anything he had written or said which could be...

prepositions

prepositions   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of American Usage and Style

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
902 words

...particles are necessary, and, strip the sentence as bare as you will, they cannot be entirely dispensed with ” ( G. H. Vallins , The Best English , 1960) . • “It was the boys in the back room, after all, whom Marlene Dietrich felt comfortable drinking with ” ( N.Y. Times ). See which & that . Redundant Prepositions. Writers often repeat prepositions unnecessarily when there are intervening phrases or clauses. E.g.: “Sue is survived by her beloved husband, Roy C. Walker , with whom she shared her life with for 63 years” ( Austin American-Statesman )....

View: