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bare life

Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben's concept for life that has been exposed to what he terms the structure of exception that constitutes contemporary biopower. The term originates in ...

Antony and Cleopatra

Antony and Cleopatra   Reference library

Michael Dobson and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,330 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...Princess’s in 1890 . Although Beerbohm Tree staged a predictably lavish version in 1907 , this approach to the play had already been superseded in Frank Benson ’s much sparer production (with himself as Antony) at Stratford, seconded by Robert Atkins ’s revolutionary, almost bare-stage production at the Old Vic in 1922 , in which Edith Evans played her first Cleopatra. Throughout the play’s stage history, productions in which both central performances have been equally praised have been rare: for many Vivien Leigh ’s Cleopatra ( 1951 ) outshone...

Hamlet, Prince of Denmark

Hamlet, Prince of Denmark   Reference library

Michael Dobson and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
4,261 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...despite being the most familiar play in the world, Hamlet still seems one of the most excitingly unpredictable, its ending as abrupt and tragic an interruption as ever. Critical history: It would be impossible, even in a book-length study, to do full justice to any more than the bare outlines of this play’s impact, not just in literary criticism and on the stage, but on Western culture at large: its characters have entered the realm of myth, and its motifs have been endlessly reworked, in fiction ( Gothic and otherwise), painting , opera , and film no...

France

France   Reference library

Isabelle Schwartz-Gastine

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,727 words
Illustration(s):
1

...Lugné-Poë ( 1869–1940 ) promoted ‘Shakespeare without setting’ in an article after visiting William Poel ’s Shakespeare Stage Society. In a memorable one-night experiment at the Cirque d’Été in Paris, he directed a debatable Mesure pour mesure in 1898 on a reproduction of the bare Elizabethan stage with some innovative acting in the auditorium. His success was recognized in 1913 with a version of Hamlet by Georges Duval ‘in complete conformity with the English text’ in a fixed set (a Norman arch backstage) with only a few movable painted curtains. His...

Swan theatre

Swan theatre   Reference library

Gabriel Egan and Julian Bowsher

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
753 words
Illustration(s):
1

...external rendering too was deceptive. The described marbling, the circular shape, and the use of classical columns with ornate bases and capitals put the Swan in a neoclassical, Palladian tradition of design emerging at the end of the 16th century despite the apparent Tudor bareness of the sketch. The Swan was closed in 1597 when Pembroke’s Men played The Isle of Dogs (now lost) by Thomas Nashe and Ben Jonson , which was highly critical of the government and which landed the dramatists in jail. By 1602 it appears to have been operating again: the...

prose

prose   Reference library

Jonathan Hope

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...Hal, mine. prince harry . I did never see such pitiful rascals. sir john . Tut, tut, good enough to toss, food for powder, food for powder. They’ll fill a pit as well as better. Tush, man, mortal men, mortal men. westmorland . Ay, but Sir John, methinks they are exceeding poor and bare, too beggarly. ( 1 Henry IV 4.2.61–9) Literary-stylistic approaches to Shakespeare’s prose (such as those of Jonas Barish and Brian Vickers) have stressed the rhetorical tradition, which provided Elizabethan writers with various models for prose style. The two most influential...

Shakespeare, William

Shakespeare, William (1564–1616)   Reference library

Stanley Wells

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,225 words
Illustration(s):
2

...simply have helped his father with the family business. Presumably he started to write before joining a theatre company, but only a sonnet that seems to pun on the name ‘Hathaway’ has been assigned to his early years. The sole record of him during the so-called ‘lost years’ is a bare mention in a lawsuit involving his uncle by marriage, Edmund Lambert , in 1587 . It has been guessed that he joined the Queen’s Men when they visited Stratford in this year, but this distinguished company would have been unlikely to hire a novice. Still, Shakespeare’s...

radio, British

radio, British   Reference library

Jean Chothia

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...Bankhead: see United States of America ) , and although the German national network famously transmitted Brecht ’s adaptations of Hamlet and Macbeth in 1927 , the richest tradition of radio Shakespeare has been that of the BBC. Probably because written for an essentially bare stage and learned as cue parts, Shakespeare’s plays have proved adaptable to radio, with its reliance on expressive language and suggestive sound effects. Scenes are set and characters repeatedly named in Shakespeare’s dialogue while exits, entrances, and significant gestures and...

nineteenth-century Shakespearian production

nineteenth-century Shakespearian production   Reference library

Richard Foulkes

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...whose niece, Lilian Baylis , was to turn to Shakespeare in despair. In 1877 Poel had founded the Elizabethans, a company of ‘professional ladies and gentlemen’ dedicated to creating ‘a more general taste’ for Shakespeare; in 1881 he staged the ‘bad’ quarto of Hamlet on a bare platform in St George’s Hall, London, with himself in the title role. In 1893 Poel produced Measure for Measure on what was intended as a reconstruction of the Fortune theatre which was placed (inauthentically) within the proscenium arch at the Royalty theatre. The following...

Twain, Mark

Twain, Mark (1835–1910)   Quick reference

An A-Z Guide to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...Mark ( 1835–1910 ) ‘the most celebrated thing in Shakespeare’; from Huckleberry Finn ( 1884 ) To be, or not to be; that is the bare bodkin That makes calamity of so long life: For who would fardels bear, till Birnam Wood do come to Dunsinane. But that the fear of something after death, Murders the innocent sleep, Great nature's second course, And makes us rather sling the arrows of outrageous fortune Than fly to others that we know not of. There's the respect must give us pause: Wake Duncan with thy knocking! I would thou couldst, For who would bear...

bad quarto

bad quarto   Quick reference

An A-Z Guide to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...world, Scorned by the right rich, the rich curssed of the poore? The Prince of Denmarke The widow being oppressed, the orphan wrong'd, The taste of hunger, or a tirants raigne, And thousand more calamities besides, To grunt and sweate vnder this weary life, When that he may his full quietus make, With a bare bodkin, who would this indure, But for a hope of something after death? Which pusles the braine, and doth confound the sence, Which makes vs rather beare those euilles we haue, Than flie to others that we know not of. I that, O this conscience makes...

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