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bare life

Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben's concept for life that has been exposed to what he terms the structure of exception that constitutes contemporary biopower. The term originates in ...

Baring-Gould, Sabine

Baring-Gould, Sabine   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Children's Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature, Children's literature studies
Length:
194 words

...tales, with two original tales, “Don't Know” and “ Pretty Marushka ”; and Old English Fairy Tales ( 1895 ), in part reworkings of old ballads. Terri Doughty Kirk-Smith, Harold . Now the Day Is Over: Life and Times of Sabine Baring-Gould 1834–1924 . Boston, U.K.: Richard Kay, 1997. Purcell, Ernest . Onward Christian Soldier: A Life of Sabine Baring- Gould, Parson, Squire, Novelist, Antiquary . London: Longmans, Green,...

Gordon, John

Gordon, John   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Children's Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature, Children's literature studies
Length:
177 words

...it. The House on the Brink ( 1970 ), The Ghost on the Hill ( 1976 ), and many later novels and short stories by the prolific writer are a mixture of fantasy and horror, where the border between external and internal reality is blurred. Maria Nikolajeva Blishen, Edward . “The Bare Pebble: The Novels of John Gordon.” Signal 8 (May 1972): 62–73. Blishen, Edward . “The Slow Art of John Gordon.” Signal 40 (January 1983):...

Wilson the Wonder Athlete

Wilson the Wonder Athlete   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Children's Literature (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Children's literature studies
Length:
215 words

...Wilson the Wonder Athlete Hero of stories in the boys’ magazine Wizard (and later in Hornet and Hotspur ), and then revived briefly in Spike in the 1980s. Wilson lives such a healthy life that he has reached the age of 128 without even looking middle-aged. His home is a cave in ‘the remote wilderness of Axmoor’; he sleeps on the bare ground beneath the stars and eats a diet of ‘gruel, nuts and berries’. Now and then he emerges to perform amazing athletic feats. His achievements are summed up by Benny Green in an article in the Spectator ( 26 December...

Heidi

Heidi (1881)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Children's Literature (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Children's literature studies
Length:
382 words

...the death of his son and daughter-in-law (Heidi’s parents) as God’s vengeance on him. Nevertheless he welcomes Heidi kindly to his bare but hospitable hut and she is soon delightedly sharing his frugal life, spending all her days in summer roaming the mountain-slopes with young Peter the goatherd. In the winter she goes down the mountain every afternoon to sit with and talk to Peter’s old blind grandmother, whose bleak life is greatly cheered by her. When she is eight years old Heidi is virtually kidnapped from the mountain by Dete, who carries her off to...

Collins, Heather

Collins, Heather   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Children's Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature, Children's literature studies
Length:
297 words

...started illustrating for the Encounters series with books for children such as Fair Play ( 1982 ) and Runaway ( 1982 ), she has illustrated more than thirty books, both fiction and nonfiction. She is known best for her illustrations of Kathy Stinson ’s books, such as The Bare Naked Book ( 1986 ), The Dressed Up Book ( 1990 ), and The Fabulous Ball Book ( 1993 ). She has also collaborated many times with Pamela Hickman in two series, Starting with Nature and My First Look at Nature . Her illustrations have appeared in books from Jane Drake ...

Dirks, Rudolph

Dirks, Rudolph   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Children's Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature, Children's literature studies
Length:
324 words

...and Life . Given the success of R. F. Outcault 's Yellow Kid in Pulitzer newspapers, William Randolph Hearst was keen to develop his own popular cartoon feature. In 1897 he requested that Dirks create such a strip, inspired by the German children's book, Max und Moritz by Wilhelm Busch ( 1865 ). A similarity can be seen between this book and Dirks's brainchild, the Katzenjammer Kids . Featuring the eponymous twins, Hans and Fritz , the strip focused on the boys' unerring instinct for mischief, and usually ended up with the two children, bare...

ROSSETTI, Christina Georgina

ROSSETTI, Christina Georgina (1830–94)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Children's Literature (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Children's literature studies
Length:
380 words

...her biographer Georgina Battiscombe has called ‘a correct Church of England mould’. Indeed Rossetti’s strict Evangelism was a hallmark of her life and biographers have speculated that her religion was a key factor in her rejection of proposals of marriage from the Pre-Raphaelite painter James Collinson and the classical scholar Charles Bagot Cayley. All the same, few other poets of her period laid their emotions so bare to the world, and delighted so obviously in beauty. After her death, her brother William Michael Rossetti published Maude ( 1897 ), a short...

McMillan, Bruce

McMillan, Bruce   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Children's Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature, Children's literature studies
Length:
409 words

...children's author, Nonni ( 1857–1944 ). Perhaps McMillan's characterizing The Remarkable Riderless Runaway Tricycle (one of his few photo-illustrated fantasies, 1978 ; film version, 1982 ) as autobiographical offers a clue to his divining inspiration from both austerity and bare concepts. When McMillan looks at the tricycle, he sees his own persistence, determination, and penchant for happy endings. Janice M....

Storytelling in the United Kingdom and the United States

Storytelling in the United Kingdom and the United States   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Children's Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature, Children's literature studies
Length:
597 words

...movement also emphasized storytelling, popularizing it among the middle classes. As children's publishing developed, oral folk tales intended as adult entertainment were adapted in collections for children by folk scholars such as Joseph Jacobs , Andrew Lang , and Sabine Baring-Gould . From the start of children's libraries in the late 19th century , storytelling was a regular and popular activity, spread further by librarians to schools, settlement houses, and theaters. Marie Shedlock , Sara Cone Bryant , and Anne Carroll Moore dominated the years...

Doyle, Arthur Conan

Doyle, Arthur Conan   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Children's Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature, Children's literature studies
Length:
537 words

... has made an animated film in which all the characters are dogs. Recently Conan Doyle's stories have reached young people through a Granada TV series in which the title role is played by Jeremy Brett . See also Mystery and Detective Stories and Series Books . Ariko Kawabata Baring-Gould, William S . The Annotated Sherlock Holmes . London: John Murray, 1968. Booth, Martin . The Doctor and the Detective: A Biography of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle . New York: Thomas Dunne, 1997. Jann, Rosemary . The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes: Detecting Social Order . New...

riddles

riddles   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Children's Literature (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Children's literature studies
Length:
542 words

...not managed to solve them all. By the time riddles began to appear in print in England in the 16th and early 17th cents. they were simpler in character, and solutions were provided. For example: ‘Two legs sat upon three legs, and had one leg in her hand, then in came four legs and bare away one leg.’ Solution: a woman sitting on a stool eating a leg of mutton, which is stolen from her by a dog; from The Booke of Meery Riddles ( 1629 ). Riddle books of the 18th cent. often contained verses, some of which were well known as nursery rhymes . For example: ‘Nancy...

Nursery Rhymes

Nursery Rhymes   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Children's Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature, Children's literature studies
Length:
2,241 words
Illustration(s):
2

...and to make of them what matters to their understanding of the world and operation in it. See also Chapbooks ; Fairy Tales and Folk Tales ; Lullaby ; Picture Books ; Toy Books ; and biographies of figures mentioned in this article. Carole H. Carpenter Baring-Gould, William S. , and Ceil Baring-Gould . The Annotated Mother Goose . New York: Branhall House, 1962. Holden, Robert . Twinkle, Twinkle, Southern Cross: The Forgotten Folklore of Australian Nursery Rhymes . Canberra: National Library of Australia, 1992. Factor, June. Far Out, Brussel...

Baum, L. Frank

Baum, L. Frank   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Children's Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature, Children's literature studies
Length:
1,372 words
Illustration(s):
2

...passages that adults admire—but children skip—when creating his fairyland. Instead, he employed a good, solid, unadorned, almost formal American style. The first few paragraphs of The Wizard of Oz alone demonstrate his unique power to create a concrete reality through bare means. Gore Vidal has called it American prose at its best. Baum wrote vividly about a land entirely of his own invention and populated it with some of the most extraordinary characters in juvenile literature. He was not writing stories; he was writing the true history of Oz....

BARRIE, J. M.

BARRIE, J. M. (1860–1937)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Children's Literature (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Children's literature studies
Length:
2,306 words

...the first was Porthos, a St Bernard named after one of the Three Musketeers , of which Barrie himself became inordinately fond, and which provided the first germ of the dog Nana in Peter Pan . For his part, Barrie began to write a novel, Sentimental Tommy ( 1896 ), which laid bare much of his own agonized personality. The book appeared in the same year as Margaret Ogilvy , Barrie’s portrait of his mother, who had died in 1895 . In 1896 Barrie and his wife visited America, chiefly to meet the Broadway theatrical producer Charles Frohman and to discuss...

Hoban, Russell

Hoban, Russell   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Children's Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature, Children's literature studies
Length:
1,079 words
Illustration(s):
1

...and his 1990 Jim Hedgehog and The Lonesome Tower is evident too through the range of his “adult” novels, most notably in his 1974 Kleinzeit , his 1987 The Medusa Frequency , and his 1983 Pilgermann , and it continues with manifestly more contorted, and progressively barer and sparer, verbal gymnastics in his 1996 Fremder and his young adult novel of the same year, The Trokeville Way . The seventy-five short chapters that make up his 2003 adult novel Her Name Was Lola have been described as being “almost like haiku” for the quality of their...

Central America

Central America   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Children's Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature, Children's literature studies
Length:
2,119 words
Illustration(s):
1

...to Mexico, where survival is more likely than in El Salvador. Author Demetria Martinez uses time fluidly, keeping the audience in the present “now,” letting the emotional tensions of life in exile become palpable. The beauty of the prose allows readers to travel the often painful terrain of an unfolding love story—a terrain where human rights atrocities are laid bare and U.S. complicity does not escape scrutiny. The tortuous path to “El Norte” is again explored in Journey of the Sparrows ( 1991 ), a novel by Fran Leeper Buss in collaboration with the...

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