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agrarian

Describing an agricultural system which combines horticulture and animals.

Tigua Dance

Tigua Dance   Reference library

The International Encyclopedia of Dance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Dance, Music
Length:
454 words

...are slightly hunched. The arms move from the elbows, causing the forearms to raise and lower. The legs alternately lift from one side to another. This stepping movement is subdued for women but almost a prance when performed by men. The Tigua of Ysleta del Sur are no longer an agrarian people and, as a result, the meanings of their ceremonies have changed. The dances are now prayers and affirmations of Tigua identity. The participants have individual reasons for dancing: to acknowledge answered prayers, to pray for strength to overcome a problem, or to answer...

Myanmar

Myanmar   Reference library

The International Encyclopedia of Dance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Dance, Music
Length:
2,502 words

...often called collectively “hill tribes.” These include such groups as the Shan, the Kachin, and the Chin. In the low-lands live the Burmese, who, along with their cultural and linguistic neighbors the Arakanese, form the single largest cultural group. Many Burmese follow an agrarian way of life, although one-fourth of the modern population resides in urban areas, chiefly in the cities of Rangoon (Yangon) and Mandalay. Nat Pwe Ceremony Although nominally Buddhist, the country actually has two important and distinct religions; coexisting with Buddhism is the...

Egypt

Egypt   Reference library

The International Encyclopedia of Dance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Dance, Music
Length:
12,773 words

...by dancing, as was the month-long Opet Festival, during which the sacred bark of Amun sailed the Nile from Karnak to Luxor and back. There were dances in homage to the king at the receipt of foreign tribute, at ceremonies when the monarch conferred honors upon subjects; at agrarian work-associated festivities, such as thanksgiving, at harvest time; at postcircumcision initiation rites; at war or combat dances and games; as entertainment for the king and others of quality or rank; at banquets; at funerary feasts and in processions; and during the transport...

Cuba

Cuba   Reference library

The International Encyclopedia of Dance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Dance, Music
Length:
5,251 words

...it remained a Spanish colony, and slavery was abolished only in 1886 . In 1895 a new war for independence culminated in the Spanish-American War of 1898 and the establishment of the Cuban republic that year. On 1 January 1959 Fidel Castro 's Marxist government, based on agrarian reform, replaced a series of dictators. The population, some 12 million, are of Spanish (criollos) , African, and mixed Spanish-African descent. They are mainly Roman Catholic, which is tolerated by the government. Since the mid-nineteenth century urban Western culture has...

China

China   Reference library

The International Encyclopedia of Dance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Dance, Music
Length:
15,393 words

...Arts ; Costume in Asian Traditions ; and Mask and Makeup , article on Asian Traditions . ] An Overview The immense time span of Chinese history permits only a subjective view of so transient an art as dancing. Dance in China evolved from the socioreligious rituals of early agrarian communities, blossomed as secular entertainment under court patronage while also serving the needs of Confucian high ritual, and finally emerged as a great animating force of the theater. In theater lies China's most obvious contribution to the dance. History The texts of the...

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