You are looking at 1-8 of 8 entries  for:

  • All: agrarianism x
  • Literary studies (19th century) x
clear all

View:

Overview

agrarian

Describing an agricultural system which combines horticulture and animals.

Brady, Pat

Brady, Pat   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

...of the Ballycloran estate who incriminates his young master, Thady Macdermot , in a plot to murder Myles Ussher . Though fond of Thady , his expedient, self-serving nature allows him to be manipulated by Hyacinth Keegan . At one time ‘a leader to [the tenants] in their agrarian feelings and troubles’ (III), by the end of the tale he is a thorough turncoat, spying for the revenue police until murdered by two Ribbonmen, one a former tenant of Ballycloran. MB MRS Monika Rydygier...

American Civil War

American Civil War   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
556 words

...For better or for worse the United States was seen as a crystal ball in which Britain's democratic future might be read. Both the North and the South hoped for British support. The South was disappointed by Britain's neutrality; the North was angered. Polite society favoured the agrarian, ‘gentlemanly’ Southerners, while liberal intellectuals like Trollope and Goldwin Smith , and radical politicians like John *Bright , generally supported the dynamic, progressive North. Although anti-slave sentiment was profound in Britain, it was by no means evident that...

Ireland

Ireland   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Brontes

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
593 words

...obtained legislative independence from Britain with the establishment of an Irish parliament. This gave more power to wealthy Protestant landowners, but greater misery to a mainly Catholic peasantry suffering from absentee landlordism, rackrenting, and eviction. In the 1790s agrarian discontent and the spread of French revolutionary ideas led to the formation of the United Irishmen, who aimed to secure Irish independence. Patrick 's brother William joined the rebels, fought at the Battle of Ballynahinch in June 1798 , and was fortunate to escape the...

Austen, Jane

Austen, Jane (1775–1817)   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
974 words

...of her presentation. ‘She wrote of the times in which she lived, of the class of people with which she associated, and in the language which was usual to her’ This is, of course, precisely what Trollope did half a century later in a society that had traded in a fairly peaceful agrarian and feudal model for an aggressively democratic and industrial one. There were even fewer heroes and heroines in Trollope 's time than there were in Austen 's, but it was not to heroic adventures but truth to life that each looked for substance. Indeed, both were staunchly...

imagery in the Brontës' works

imagery in the Brontës' works   Reference library

Beverly Taylor

The Oxford Companion to the Brontes

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
2,059 words

...background evokes an anxiety conventionally associated with Gothic antecedents, an emotional response the narrative eventually redirects against Mr Arthur Huntingdon 's domestic brutality. Juxtaposing moods and descriptions of the seemingly Gothic Wildfell Hall, its mundane agrarian neighbourhood, and Grassdale Manor , transfers the terrors of Gothic fiction to the realities of everyday life involving alcoholism and spousal oppression. Among recurring motifs, Anne refers to Helen's paintings to reveal her psychology and to develop themes dealing with...

Marxist approaches

Marxist approaches   Reference library

Carol A. Bock

The Oxford Companion to the Brontes

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
2,443 words

...‘intensely concrete’ and yet fundamentally symbolic (pp. 139–40). Twenty-two years later, Raymond Williams identified a materialist basis for the plot of Wuthering Heights in the conflict between the ‘working Heights’ and the ‘renting Grange’; between, that is, an older, agrarian-based class of property-owners who worked their own land and a newer class of gentry whose economic relation to the land was mediated and indirect. When Catherine Earnshaw decides to marry Edgar rather than the propertyless Heathcliff, the lovers are so divided that the novel...

psychoanalytic approaches

psychoanalytic approaches   Reference library

Carol A. Bock

The Oxford Companion to the Brontes

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
2,904 words

...also rejects (as does French psychoanalytic theory generally). In his 1985 book Emily Brontë , James Kavanagh analyses the family in Wuthering Heights as a socio-economic unit in transition from being a structure of relationships that functioned in support of an older, agrarian culture to ‘an arena of psycho-sexual struggle’ which forms the social subjects necessary for modern capitalist economy. In a manner that has become increasingly common for psychoanalytic critics, Kavanagh joins Freudian notions about family romance and Lacanian ideas about ‘the...

agriculture

agriculture   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Hardy

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
2,945 words

...between man and the land has been virtually broken, all Hardy's major novels have a rural setting. Yet it is interesting that he does not often write directly about farmers and labourers, although he was aware that their interests often clashed and sometimes referred to the agrarian riots in the decade before he was born. Most of his farmers are unsympathetic, even brutal figures (Shiner, Groby, Troutham, Lodge in ‘The Withered Arm’). In ‘The Dorsetshire Labourer’ ( 1883 ) he says that ‘it was once common enough on inferior farms to hear a farmer, as he sat...

View: