You are looking at 1-20 of 1,095 entries  for:

  • All: academic monitoring x
  • Type: Subject Reference x
clear all

View:

Overview

academic monitoring

The process of observing students' academic progress in one or more subject over a period of time. It is used by teachers to compare the performance of a particular student to that of ...

academic monitoring

academic monitoring   Quick reference

Isabella Wallace

A Dictionary of Education (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Social sciences, Education
Length:
186 words

... monitoring The process of observing students’ academic progress in one or more subject over a period of time. It is used by teachers to compare the performance of a particular student to that of his/her classmates and to identify students who are struggling, excelling, or underachieving. Information for examining students’ progress is usually collected in the form of test marks and teacher assessment levels or grades. These are often recorded on tracking sheets , or progress reports , which can then be issued to parents at intervals during the...

33 The History of the Book in Poland

33 The History of the Book in Poland   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
4,081 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...atmosphere came to an end after the November Uprising of 1823 . In Warsaw, from 1801 the Society of the Friends of Science played an invaluable role in promoting academic publishing until its closure in 1831 . During the later 19 th century, without state support, the Polish School Society and the Mianowski Fund supported publishing both for schools and for research and academic communities. Influential private firms included the Glücksbergs for Polish history and literature, and the Arcts for textbooks, *music , *children’s book s, and, in the...

44 The History of the Book in Australia

44 The History of the Book in Australia   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
6,048 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...of *New South Wales ) in Sydney in 1826 . Independent newspapers were increasing in number, and were less vulnerable to government interference: Bent’s defiance had been squashed in 1825 ; but when Governor Darling imprisoned the proprietors of the Australian and the Monitor in 1829 , the newspapers both continued publishing. The mid- 1820s saw an upsurge of original poetry in Sydney and Hobart newspapers. The first magazine, Robert Howe’s Australian Magazine (Sydney, 1821 ), was soon followed by the first book of verse by an Australian-born...

Irish Local and Family History

Irish Local and Family History   Quick reference

Kevin Whelan

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
4,945 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...at the Institute of Irish Studies, Queen's University, Belfast), and the Federation of Local History Societies (based at Rothe House, Kilkenny) produce useful newsletters, which list member societies and their activities; they also act in a coordinating, policy‐setting, and monitoring capacity. The Group for the Study of Irish Historic Settlement, established in 1971 , has also maintained a dialogue with local history societies through an annual rotating conference. A further distinctively Irish mode of exchange has been the phenomenally successful Summer...

Education

Education   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,267 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...largely scientific subjects (his ‘Chrestomathia’). A prospectus for the ‘University of London’ was issued, an appeal launched, a joint-stock company founded to manage the funds, and some distinguished academic staff appointed (predominantly from Scotland or abroad). Around 300 men were admitted as students in 1828 . Various forces within the English academic and ecclesiastical establishments strongly opposed the new institution, and it had to wait another eight years before it was granted a charter, which officially renamed it ‘University College, London’....

Publishing

Publishing   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
6,242 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...their capacity to play a part in the evolving drama of national politics. By 1776 this reading public was well established and the cultural and especially political implications of its composition were vigorously debated. What were its boundaries? Should the reading public be monitored, or learn to discipline itself? For the bookseller James *Lackington , the expansion in the reading public was a development to be welcomed, especially insofar as it reflected on his own achievements. In his self-aggrandizing Memoirs ( 1791 ), Lackington commented ‘that the...

Abbreviations

Abbreviations   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
1,772 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...cash from an ATM machine , using a PIN number as a password. A supermarket clerk searches a milk carton for its UPC code . High-school seniors study hard for the SAT test (though the SAT owners now insist that the T does not stand for test — see SAT ). Economists monitor the CPI Index . American and Russian diplomats sit down to negotiate at the SALT talks as their military counterparts consider whether to launch ABM missiles . Websites may display pages in PDF format . And scientists try to unlock the mysteries of the deadly HIV virus ....

academic board

academic board   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Education (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Social sciences, Education
Length:
49 words

... board A committee of staff and managers in a university or college which meets regularly for the purpose of regulating and monitoring the academic affairs of the institution. Staff members are usually nominated and elected by their peers, although such a board will normally include some co-opted...

citation geography

citation geography   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Human Geography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Human Geography
Length:
74 words

...geography The geographical analysis of citation data. Citations are references in an article or a book to other scholarly works. They comprise one measure of academic influence. Citations are monitored and compiled in databases such as the ISI indexes or Google Scholar. By mining these databases it is possible to map and rank key sites of geographical knowledge production and to also construct citation networks of the inter-relationships between authors, places, and...

tutor

tutor   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Education (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Social sciences, Education
Length:
156 words

...the workload of a student or group of students, and for providing support in matters relating to their studies. Trainee teachers on teaching practice , for example, have a tutor to advise them and to monitor their progress in their placement . A tutor may also be a subject specialist who guides or advises the student in a specific aspect of their academic discipline, such as supporting students through their master’s degree or doctoral studies. Like the term ‘teacher’, ‘tutor’ cannot be defined by one specific role. Broadly, it could be said that...

universities and higher education

universities and higher education   Reference library

The New Oxford Companion to Law

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law
Length:
1,069 words

...autonomous power lies with the lay‐dominated Board of Governors or Council, but the collective of academics/faculty remain influential via the Academic Board/Senate; and there is considerable debate about the balance of managerialism/corporatism versus collegiality/shared‐values in their governance and management. HEIs and government/agencies, including fair access to higher education Government finances HEIs as private autonomous entities and monitors their use of taxpayers' money via various agencies: the funding councils (see R v Universities Funding...

Royal Academy of Dance

Royal Academy of Dance   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Dance (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Dance, Music
Length:
209 words

...board. It was founded on 31 Dec. 1920 by Philip Richardson in conjunction with an eminent group of dancers and teachers including Adeline Genée and Édouard Espinosa. It was originally known as the Association of Operatic Dancing in Great Britain and its aim was to monitor standards of classical ballet training. In 1936 it was granted its royal charter, becoming the Royal Academy of Dancing, and it developed into the world's largest examining and training body, holding examinations for all standards of ballet throughout the world. It began...

examination

examination   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Education (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Social sciences, Education
Length:
233 words

... A means of formal summative assessment , usually involving time-constrained tasks, which assesses the knowledge , skills , or understanding of the candidate. Conduct of candidates and the regulation of start and finish times are usually monitored and enforced by one or more invigilators . The major national examinations in England, Northern Ireland, and Wales are the General Certificate of Secondary Education and the General Certificate of Education ( GCE ) Advanced Level (A level). In Scotland they are the Standard Grades , the Highers...

ubiquitous computing

ubiquitous computing   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Computer Science (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

...are the refrigerator that is aware of its contents via embedded tags and is thus able to suggest shopping lists, plan menus, warn of approaching expiry dates, etc.; a home environment (heating, lighting, etc.) that continuously adjusts itself according to data from biometric monitors incorporated into clothing; and automatic recognition of a returning home owner so that security alarms are switched off and appropriate in-house systems activated. Such a model becomes possible as the size of computing devices decreases and their power increases, with wireless...

Plants

Plants  

Magic Universe: A Grand Tour of Modern Science

.... Seasonal growth has large effects on the concentration of carbon dioxide in the air, and on the surface life of the planet— see Carbon cycle and Biosphere from space . Because the leaves of land plants adapt to changing carbon dioxide levels, fossil leaves can help to monitor past changes— see Carbon cycle . The ecology of plant life looms large among the anxieties about the state of the planet, but fundamental issues remain in dispute— see Biodiversity . Ecologists have become acutely aware of the importance of controlling the numbers of plant...

hedge schools

hedge schools   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Irish History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
249 words

...in classics and modern languages. Such books as were used were often simply what lay to hand, e.g. religious literature or novels. Children were taught individually, though William Carleton , himself a hedge school pupil and teacher, claimed that a system close to the monitorial was quite common by the early 19th century. Kenneth...

heritage legislation

heritage legislation   Reference library

The New Oxford Companion to Law

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law
Length:
323 words

...is made up of a complex set ofinternational conventions, national Acts, and administrative guidelines and requirements at the sub‐national and local levels. There are also a plethora of governmental, quasi‐governmental, and private organizations which organize, manage, and monitor heritage initiatives. There is no one regime of heritage legislation. Because of this complexity, the best way to approach the available resources is by heritage area: archaeological, architectural, cultural, environmental, and natural sources and areas of heritage are each...

awarding body

awarding body   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Education (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Social sciences, Education
Length:
360 words

...Alliance . These three awarding bodies are responsible for academic and vocational qualifications for 18–19-year-olds. There remain, however, a large number of smaller awarding bodies, each responsible for qualifications in a specific area, which operate nationally and regionally within the further education sector . The specific operating procedures of awarding bodies vary, but their role will usually include advising on, or specifying, curriculum content; devising, monitoring, and administrating assessments; operating a system of verification to...

learner-centred

learner-centred   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Education (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Social sciences, Education
Length:
320 words

...and allows for learner control over the learning activities employed; and the curriculum takes as its starting point those topics which are of direct interest and relevance to the learners. In a learner-centred approach, learners are encouraged to take some responsibility for monitoring and evaluating their own progress. In its most radical form it implies a democratic community of learning where learners and teachers have equal status, and learners exercise a choice over whether and what they will learn. It is an approach to education which emphasizes ...

neoliberalism

neoliberalism   Quick reference

Andrew Hurrell and Laura Gomez-Mera

A Concise Oxford Dictionary of Politics and International Relations (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics
Length:
304 words

...system. Although recognizing that the absence of a sovereign authority at the international level creates opportunities for conflict, defection, and cheating, neoliberals argue that institutions and regimes help states cooperate by reducing uncertainty, linking issues, monitoring behaviour, and enhancing the importance of reputation. These arguments are countered by neorealist theorists who stress the importance of relative rather than absolute gains and the extent to which powerful states can shape institutions for their own purposes and avoid them...

View: