You are looking at 1-8 of 8 entries  for:

  • Literary studies (19th century) x
clear all

View:

Daily Telegraph

Daily Telegraph   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
585 words

...the historian E. A. *Freeman attacked fox-hunting in an article in the Fortnightly Review of October 1869 . Trollope , who was so closely connected to the Fortnightly that he regarded the publication of this article ‘almost as a rising of a child against the father’ ( Auto X), replied to Freeman in the December issue. John *Morley , editor of the Fortnightly , allowed Freeman a final rejoinder, but dissuaded Trollope from continuing the debate. None the less, Freeman contributed two lengthy letters to the Daily Telegraph , which endorsed his...

Hardy, poems about

Hardy, poems about   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Hardy

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
959 words

...ere joy-throbs dwindled | Or wan faith froze!’, with which may be compared Hardy's own ‘The Dead Quire’ and ‘A Cathedral Façade at Midnight’. Hardy's arch-parodist is Max *Beerbohm . His ‘A Luncheon’, composed in Hardy's voice, is in one version subtitled ‘Th*m*s H*rdy M*x Gate, July 20th 1923 ’, when the Prince of Wales paid the Hardys a notoriously awkward visit. The middle stanza plays upon the Prince's remark, related by Hardy to Sassoon, that ‘My mother tells me that you have written a book called [… er … er] Tess of the d'Urbervilles . I must try to...

Australia and New Zealand

Australia and New Zealand   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
1,532 words

...survival, he is convinced that the future of the colonies lies with small farmers, ‘free-selectors’, not with pastoralists grazing their flocks on vast tracts of leasehold land. ‘I love a squatter,’ he proclaims. ‘But on principle I take the part of the free-selector’ ( Australia , X). Even as the house guest of one of New South Wales's leading squatter-politicians, he did not hesitate to state his views publicly when he became involved in an election campaign in the nearest town. The opinions he expresses on some of the other burning political issues of the day...

philosophy

philosophy   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to George Eliot

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
1,895 words

...error of philosophy, and, from Parmenides downwards, has issued in nothing but the bewilderment of the human intellect. She particularly mentions Kant's elaborations of this fundamental error. ‘These abstract terms on which speculation has built its huge fabrics are simply the x and y by which we mark the boundary of our knowledge; they have no value except in connexion with the concrete. The abstract is derived from the concrete: what, then, can we expect from a philosophy the essence of which is the derivation of the concrete from the abstract (...

Duke's Children, The

Duke's Children, The   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
2,928 words

...a party to Mr Disraeli ; and as I have not been able to speak from the benches of the House of Commons, or to thunder from platforms, or to be efficacious as a lecturer, they have served as safety-valves by which to deliver my soul’ (X). Trollope modestly said that if he were to be among the English novelists read in the 20th century this ‘permanence of success will probably rest on the characters of Plantagenet Palliser, Lady Glencora , and the Revd Mr Crawley [of The Last Chronicle ]’. Palliser and Glencora , as we come to know them in Can You...

biographies of George Eliot

biographies of George Eliot   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to George Eliot

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
2,143 words

...‘I fell out of love with my vision of Marian Evans Lewes/“George Eliot”… Yet the textual George Eliot that I recreate as I read the writings published during her lifetime—a creature distinct from that rather depressing Victorian woman—still convinces me of greatness and wisdom’ (p. x). Some of the most subtle and searching biography of George Eliot is of just that ‘textual self’, in Rosemarie Bodenheimer 's The Real Life of Mary Ann Evans: George Eliot Her Letters and Fiction ( 1994 ). Bodenheimer's inspiration was ‘to suggest that a “best history” of George...

Wills, William Henry

Wills, William Henry (1810–80)   Reference library

John Drew

Oxford Reader's Companion to Dickens

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
2,089 words

...He wrote for the Penny and Saturday magazines, McCulloch's Geographical Dictionary , and first became known to Dickens in 1839 , when, as editor of Bentley's Miscellany , Dickens accepted one of two stories submitted by him and wrote requesting more ( Lehmann 1971 , p. x). In 1841 Wills was among the original literary staff of Punch and for some time acted as its regular drama critic, but his strong editorial abilities were soon recognized in appointments as assistant editor of Chambers's Edinburgh Journal ( 1842–5 ) and in 1845 , as...

Author’s Notes

Author’s Notes   Reference library

Oxford Reader’s Companion To Conrad

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
1,159 words

...never sinned against the basic feelings and elementary convictions which make life possible to the mass of mankind and, by establishing a standard of judgment, set their idealism free to look for plainer ways, for higher feelings, for deeper purposes’ (‘Author’s Note’, Chance , p. x). The 1920 introduction to Victory again finds Conrad hoping that his own ‘bit of imagined drama’ has not aggravated a war-torn world ‘already full of doubts and fears’ and solemnly addressing the ‘unchanging Man of history’ (p. ix). One happy result is that Conrad, whether by intention...

View: