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Maragha

Maragha   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
657 words

...It shows a restrained use of glazed decoration in light blue that complements the reddish brick. The anonymous cylindrical tomb tower ( 1167 ) shows a more extensive use of light-blue tile, and the nearby decagonal Gunbad-i Kabud (“Blue tomb”; 1196–7 ; diam. 9.0 m) is almost enveloped in a glazed web. Tile mosaic in three colors (light and dark blue and white) appears on the two tomb towers from the 14th century, the 8.33 m square Gunbad-i Ghaffariya built for Shams al-Din Qarasunqur ( d. 1328 ), a Mamluk amir who was governor of Azerbaijan for the Ilkhanids,...

Architecture

Architecture   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
117,015 words
Illustration(s):
77

...strapwork decorating the spandrels and tympanum over the doorway. By the time the nearby Gunbad-i Kabud was built ( 1196–7 ), the use of color had increased to such an extent that the tomb is virtually enveloped by a web of blue glazed tile. Bannā῾ī (“builder's [technique]”) was an easy and effective way of decorating large surfaces (see §X, B, 2 below). Plaster and terracotta were also used to cover large surfaces, especially in mud-brick buildings. The Imamzada Karrar at Buzun in central Iran ( 1133–4 ), a rectangular structure in mud-brick, has magnificent...

Central Asia

Central Asia   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
48,691 words
Illustration(s):
10

...surface of the design. Cross stitch (Tajik iroki ) was widespread in the mountains, while it was used to decorate robes in Bukhara and Shahr-i Sabz. Embroidery was used to decorate furnishings, clothing and ceremonial objects. Large wall hangings ( sūzanī ; usually 3.5×2.5 m and 2.0×1.5 m) were made of embroidered panels, occasionally done by different hands, sewn together (see fig. 8). Embroidery was also used for blanket- and cushion-covers, hearth-covers ( sandalpush ), prayer mats ( dzhoynamoz ) and other decorative items. Embroidery was obligatory...

Textiles

Textiles   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
32,331 words
Illustration(s):
12

...Many of these motifs appear in contemporary manuscripts, metalwork and ceramics made for the Ottoman court, suggesting that court studios had a strong impact on textile designers and weavers. 7. Compound-weave silk and twill fragment woven with metal thread, 0.67×1.21 m, from Bursa or Istanbul, 2nd half 16th century (New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Purchase, Joseph Pulitzer Bequest, 1952 (52.20.21); image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art/Art Resource, NY In the 18th and 19th centuries the fondness for floral motifs continued, and during the Tulip...

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