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St Hilary of Poitiers

Subject: Religion

(c.315–67/8), the foremost Latin theologian of his age. A convert from paganism, he was elected Bp. of Poitiers c.350. He became involved in the Arian disputes and, probably as ...

Latin Poetry

Latin Poetry   Reference library

A. Barchiesi, W. Wetherbee, T.V.F. Brogan, S. Penn, and W. J. Kennedy

The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies - poetry and poets
Length:
7,822 words

...influenced med. iconography and offers one of the earliest and most enduring examples of Christian allegory . The Christian Lat. poets were to coexist with, and even displace, the great pagans in the school curriculum of the early Middle Ages, but they had few imitators. More significant for med. Lat. poetry was the hymnody that appeared as Lat. replaced Gr. as the lang. of the liturgy. The cumbersome, dogmatic verse of Hilary of Poitiers ( 310–66 ) can hardly have had a liturgical function, and the rhythmical prose of the great Te Deum , despite its early and...

Senarius

Senarius   Reference library

J. W. Halporn

The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

...word end cannot fill the fifth foot in their verses; the ninth position in Seneca’s senarii is almost invariably a long even when a four-syllable word fills the last two feet. Though writers from the 1st c. bce on adhere to the Gr. practice of allowing short syllables in the third and seventh positions, late Lat. archaizing poets, incl. Hilary of Poitiers and Ausonius, return to the senarius in its original Lat. form. See canticum and diverbium , septenarius . Bibliography Hardie, pt. 1, ch. 5; W. M. Lindsay , Early Latin Verse (1922); Norberg;...

Hymn

Hymn   Reference library

P. Rollinson

The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies - poetry and poets
Length:
2,042 words

...work he notes that Hilary of Poitiers (also 4th c.) first composed hymns in celebrations of saints and martyrs ( De ecclestiacis officiis 1.7). Ambrose’s short hymns (eight quatrains of iambic dimeter) are explicitly trinitarian and were intended to counteract Arian doctrine, which had itself apparently been fostered by hymns of an Arian bent. Considerable suspicion remained in the 6th and 7th cs. over the liturgical use of hymns composed by men as opposed to the divinely inspired Psalms of the Bible. But the unquestioned orthodoxy of Ambrose himself...

Rhyme

Rhyme   Reference library

T.V.F. Brogan, S. Cushman, K. S. Chang, R.M.A. Allen, W. L. Hanaway, and C. Scott

The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies - poetry and poets
Length:
10,692 words

...worked in the opposite direction). Assonantal precursors of rhyme first appear in the Christian Lat. hymns of Hilary of Poitiers, Ambrose, and Augustine (late 3d through 4th cs.); and McKie calls arguments in favor of a Christian Lat. (incl. Ir.-Lat.) source of rhyme in OE “decisive.” Meyer thought the source for this practice to be Semitic, a view not now followed. In Byzantium, Romanus and Synesius were exploiting its possibilities in hymnology by the 6th c. Except for the intervention of med. Lat., the Eur. langs. would have developed their prosodies...

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