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St Hilary of Poitiers

Subject: Religion

(c.315–67/8), the foremost Latin theologian of his age. A convert from paganism, he was elected Bp. of Poitiers c.350. He became involved in the Arian disputes and, probably as ...

Scipione Maffei

Scipione Maffei  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1675–1755), historian. His main historical work centred on his native city of Verona. In 1712 he discovered the Theodosian Collection (q.v.).
Latin Poetry

Latin Poetry   Reference library

A. Barchiesi, W. Wetherbee, T.V.F. Brogan, S. Penn, and W. J. Kennedy

The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies - poetry and poets
Length:
7,822 words

...influenced med. iconography and offers one of the earliest and most enduring examples of Christian allegory . The Christian Lat. poets were to coexist with, and even displace, the great pagans in the school curriculum of the early Middle Ages, but they had few imitators. More significant for med. Lat. poetry was the hymnody that appeared as Lat. replaced Gr. as the lang. of the liturgy. The cumbersome, dogmatic verse of Hilary of Poitiers ( 310–66 ) can hardly have had a liturgical function, and the rhythmical prose of the great Te Deum , despite its early and...

AWARDS

AWARDS   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Children's Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature, Children's literature studies
Length:
11,389 words

...Anne Fine, Flour Babies 1994  Geraldine McCaughrean, Gold Dust 1995  Michael Morpurgo, The Wreck of the Zanzibar 1996  Anne Fine, The Tulip Touch 1997  Andrew Norriss, Aquila 1998  David Almond, Skellig 1999  J. K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban 2000  Jamila Gavin, Coram Boy 2001  Philip Pullman, The Amber Spyglass 2002  Hilary McKay, Saffy’s Angel 2003  David Almond, The Fire-Eaters 2004  Geraldine McCaughrean, Not the End of the...

Hammer

Hammer   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

..., president of the council that condemned John Huss John Faber ( 1478–1541 ): the German controversialist, was surnamed Malleus Hereticorum (‘Hammer of the Heretics’), from the title of one of his works St Hilary: bishop of Poitiers ( d. ad 368 ), was known as the Hammer of the arians Charles the Hammer: see martel Edward I ( 1239–1307 ): nicknamed Longshanks and called the Hammer of the Scots; the inscription on his tomb in Westminster Abbey reads Edwardus Primus Malleus Scotorum hic est (‘Here lies Edward I Hammer of the Scots’) Thomas...

Hilary, St

Hilary, St   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

..., St ( c. 315– c. 367 ), French bishop . In c. 350 he was appointed bishop of Poitiers, in which position he became a leading opponent of Arianism; he was named a Doctor of the Church in 1851 . His feast day is 13 January . Hilary term a university term beginning in January; a term or session of the High Court beginning in...

Martin

Martin   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

...name of two saints. St Martin de Porres ( 1579–1639 ), a Dominican lay brother, the illegitimate son of a Spanish grandee and a freed black slave from Lima in Peru. He was noted for his dedication to the poor as for his undiscriminating charity to those of all races. His feast day is 5 November. St Martin of Tours ( d.397 ), French bishop, a patron saint of France. When giving half his cloak to a beggar he received a vision of Christ, after which he was baptized. He joined St Hilary at Poitiers and founded the first monastery in Gaul. St Martin is...

Senarius

Senarius   Reference library

J. W. Halporn

The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

...word end cannot fill the fifth foot in their verses; the ninth position in Seneca’s senarii is almost invariably a long even when a four-syllable word fills the last two feet. Though writers from the 1st c. bce on adhere to the Gr. practice of allowing short syllables in the third and seventh positions, late Lat. archaizing poets, incl. Hilary of Poitiers and Ausonius, return to the senarius in its original Lat. form. See canticum and diverbium , septenarius . Bibliography Hardie, pt. 1, ch. 5; W. M. Lindsay , Early Latin Verse (1922); Norberg;...

Hymn

Hymn   Reference library

P. Rollinson

The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies - poetry and poets
Length:
2,042 words

...work he notes that Hilary of Poitiers (also 4th c.) first composed hymns in celebrations of saints and martyrs ( De ecclestiacis officiis 1.7). Ambrose’s short hymns (eight quatrains of iambic dimeter) are explicitly trinitarian and were intended to counteract Arian doctrine, which had itself apparently been fostered by hymns of an Arian bent. Considerable suspicion remained in the 6th and 7th cs. over the liturgical use of hymns composed by men as opposed to the divinely inspired Psalms of the Bible. But the unquestioned orthodoxy of Ambrose himself...

Rhyme

Rhyme   Reference library

T.V.F. Brogan, S. Cushman, K. S. Chang, R.M.A. Allen, W. L. Hanaway, and C. Scott

The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies - poetry and poets
Length:
10,692 words

...worked in the opposite direction). Assonantal precursors of rhyme first appear in the Christian Lat. hymns of Hilary of Poitiers, Ambrose, and Augustine (late 3d through 4th cs.); and McKie calls arguments in favor of a Christian Lat. (incl. Ir.-Lat.) source of rhyme in OE “decisive.” Meyer thought the source for this practice to be Semitic, a view not now followed. In Byzantium, Romanus and Synesius were exploiting its possibilities in hymnology by the 6th c. Except for the intervention of med. Lat., the Eur. langs. would have developed their prosodies...

TO TRANSLATE

TO TRANSLATE   Reference library

Clara Auvray-Assayas, Christian Bernier, Barbara Cassin, André Paul, and Irène Rosier-Catach

Dictionary of Untranslatables: A Philosophical Lexicon

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Philosophy, Literature, Literary reference works
Length:
17,498 words

...[ ad sensum interpretati sunt ],” or some others, like Saint Hilary of Poitiers, who “captured the ideas in his own language by the law of the victor [ victoris jure transposuit ]” (ibid.). For the sacred texts, Jerome requires verbum e verbo . But what this means is that he does not want to lose a single word, for each and every one contains part of the divine “mystery” ( mysterium or sacramentum ). He is thus a “translator” and not a “prophet”: “It is,” he states, “the erudition and richness of the words that translate what one understands [ eruditio et...

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