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St Hilary of Poitiers

Subject: Religion

(c.315–67/8), the foremost Latin theologian of his age. A convert from paganism, he was elected Bp. of Poitiers c.350. He became involved in the Arian disputes and, probably as ...

Ligugé

Ligugé   Reference library

Simon Loseby

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... (dep. Vienne, France) Hermitage established near Poitiers by S. Martin of Tours in 361 with the support of Hilary , Bishop of Poitiers, which soon became an enduring monastic community. Various of its buildings are known from excavation. Simon Loseby Stancliffe , St. Martin (1983). L.-J. Bord , Histoire de l’abbaye Saint-Martin de Ligugé, 361–2001 (2005). B. Boissavit-Camus , in Wisigoths et Francs autour la bataille de Vouillé (507) (2010),...

Martin, S.

Martin, S. (316–397)   Reference library

Columba Stewart

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...a disciple of Hilary of Poitiers , who trained him in asceticism . Following Hilary’s lead, Martin became an anti- Arian crusader and travelled to Italy , where he became a hermit at Milan in the 350s. Soon expelled by the Arian bishop Auxentius , he lived on the island of Gallinaria in Liguria with a presbyter friend as the first of a succession of hermits. With the restoration of Hilary to his see (360/1), Martin returned to Gaul and became a hermit at Ligugé , near Poitiers. Attracting both disciples and the attention of local clergy, he...

Sulpicius Severus

Sulpicius Severus (360–after 404)   Reference library

Michael Williams

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...are chiefly devoted to sustaining the memory of that saint and his exploits. They were also evidently written with an eye to the major controversies of his day ( Priscillianism , Jovinianism , Origenism ). The apparently authentic detail to be found among the miracles of the Life of S. Martin has led many scholars to accept it as basically truthful, although various dates and encounters (e.g. with Hilary of Poitiers ) are certainly misplaced or invented. The more polished and artificial style of the accompanying letters and the Dialogues ...

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