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St Hilary of Poitiers

Subject: Religion

(c.315–67/8), the foremost Latin theologian of his age. A convert from paganism, he was elected Bp. of Poitiers c.350. He became involved in the Arian disputes and, probably as ...

Martin of Tours, Saint

Martin of Tours, Saint (316/17–397)   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Christian Art and Architecture (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
509 words

...who is only a catechumen, covered me with his cloak.’ This became the most famous subject in his iconography. He became a member of the imperial guard, from which it was almost impossible to resign, but in 354 he finally gained his freedom, and immediately joined S. Hilary, Bishop of Poitiers. Popular opposition to soldiers becoming clerics at first prevented his being made a deacon, so he lived in a villa outside Poitiers where he founded, at Ligugé, the first community in Gaul to live as monks. He dedicated himself to evangelizing the peasants and farm...

Aquinas, Thomas

Aquinas, Thomas (1225–1274)   Reference library

Andreas Speer

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
2,736 words

...to exposit the two definitions of “comeliness or beauty” (“species sive pulchritudo”)—attributed to the Son by Hilary of Poitiers—and of “beauty or perfection” (“pulchritudo sive perfectio”) to illustrate how the Son truly and perfectly possesses the nature of the Father. Both definitions express Hilary’s intended affirmation, by means of the concept of the image (“species sive imago sive pulchritudo”), of the perfect agreement in essence shared by Father and Son. Their close association to the systematic context of Aquinas’s teaching on the divine...

Theological Aesthetics

Theological Aesthetics   Reference library

Gesa Elsbeth Thiessen

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
3,151 words

...the light of the world—abetted the hope of seeing God. Of course, the juxtaposition of light (good) and darkness (evil) had its origin in much earlier times and was prominent among the Manicheans. Lactantius, Hilary of Poitiers, Ambrose, and Augustine used the symbolism of light and praised Christ as the light of truth, the true glorious image of the invisible God. The aesthetics of light has been eminent throughout Christian theology and worship to this day. The purification of the heart, eye, and soul was considered a requirement for the vision of God. Union...

Poitiers

Poitiers   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Medieval Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Art & Architecture, History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
6,334 words
Illustration(s):
4

...was painted before the end of the 11th century in accordance with a consistent plan. The bishops of Poitiers, depicted on the pillars of the nave around the tomb of St Hilary, represent the Christian community of the diocese (some figures extant). Paintings, probably on the vault of the choir, illustrated the heavenly Church, with figures of Christ, angels and saints; in 1987 , scenes from the Apocalypse were discovered above the arches of the choir, depicting St John and the Angel , the Horsemen of the Apocalypse , the Souls under the Altar , the Angel...

Aquinas, Thomas

Aquinas, Thomas (1225)   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
2,656 words

...to exposit the two definitions of “comeliness or beauty” ( species sive pulchritudo )—attributed to the Son by Hilary of Poitiers—and of “beauty or perfection” ( pulchritudo sive perfectio ) to illustrate how the Son truly and perfectly possesses the nature of the Father. Both definitions express Hilary's intended affirmation, by means of the concept of the image ( species sive imago sive pulchritudo ), of the perfect agreement in essence shared by Father and Son. Their close association to the systematic context of Aquinas's teaching on the divine...

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