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Giambattista Vico

Giambattista Vico (1668–1744)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
91 words

...0Giambattista Giambattista Vico 1668 – 1744 Italian philosopher Uniform ideas originating among entire peoples unknown to each other must have a common ground of truth. The New Science (3rd ed., 1730) bk. 1, sect. 2, para. 13, no. 144 uniform ideas originating Uniform ideas originating entire peoples unknown to each other The nature of peoples is first crude, then severe, then benign, then delicate, finally dissolute. The New Science (3rd ed., 1730) bk. 1, sect. 2, para. 67, no. 242 first crude , then severe first crude, then severe then...

Louis Pasteur

Louis Pasteur (1822–95)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
213 words

...0Louis Louis Pasteur 1822 – 95 French chemist and bacteriologist Where observation is concerned, chance favours only the prepared mind. address given on the inauguration of the Faculty of Science, University of Lille, 7 December 1854; in R. Vallery-Radot La Vie de Pasteur (1900) ch. 4 observation is concerned chance favours only the prepared favours only the prepared There are no such things as applied sciences, only applications of science. address, 11 September 1872, in Comptes rendus des travaux du Congrès viticole et séricicole de Lyon,...

Arthur C. Clarke

Arthur C. Clarke (1917–2008)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
107 words

...0Arthur0C Arthur C. Clarke 1917 – 2008 English science fiction writer When a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. When he states that something is impossible, he is very probably wrong. Profiles of the Future (1962) ch. 2; see asimov elderly scientist states something is possible something is impossible very probably wrong Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic. Profiles of the Future (1962) ch. 2 advanced technology is indistinguishable from ...

Mark Akenside

Mark Akenside (1721–70)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
101 words

...0Mark Mark Akenside 1721 – 70 English poet and physician Mind, mind alone, bear witness, earth and heaven! The living fountains in itself contains Of beauteous and sublime. The Pleasures of Imagination (1744) bk. 1, l. 481 Mind, mind alone living fountains beauteous and sublime beauteous and sublime Nor ever yet The melting rainbow's vernal-tinctured hues To me have shone so pleasing, as when first The hand of science pointed out the path In which the sun-beams gleaming from the west Fall on the wat'ry cloud. The Pleasures of Imagination ...

Edward George Bulwer-Lytton

Edward George Bulwer-Lytton (1803–73)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
217 words

...out-glittering Keats. on tennyson The New Timon (1846) pt. 2, sect. 1, l. 62 out -babying Wordsworth out -glittering Keats It was a dark and stormy night. Paul Clifford (1830), opening words dark and stormy night dark and stormy night dark and stormy night Beneath the rule of men entirely great The pen is mightier than the sword. Richelieu (1839) act 2, sc. 2, l. 307; see burton , proverbs pen mightier than the sword pen mightier than the sword pen mightier than the sword In science, read, by preference, the newest works; in literature, the...

Douglas Adams

Douglas Adams (1952–2001)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Modern Quotations (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
90 words

...0Douglas Douglas Adams 1952 – 2001 English science fiction writer Don't panic. The Hitch Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy (1979) preface Don't panic The Answer to the Great Question Of…Life, the Universe and Everything… [ is ] Forty-two. The Hitch Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy (1979) Answer to the Great question life , the Universe and Everything Life, the universe and Everything Life, the Universe and everything Time is an illusion. Lunchtime doubly so. The Hitch Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy (1979) ch. 2 time is an illusion Time is an illusion...

Noam Chomsky

Noam Chomsky (1928– )   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
149 words

...0Noam Noam Chomsky 1928 –   American linguistics scholar The notion ‘grammatical’ cannot be identified with ‘meaningful’ or ‘significant’ in any semantic sense. Sentences (1) and (2) are equally nonsensical, but…only the former is grammatical. (1) Colourless green ideas sleep furiously. (2) Furiously sleep ideas green colourless. Syntactic Structures (1957) ch. 2 colourless green ideas Colourless green ideas Colourless green ideas green ideas sleep furiously green ideas sleep furiously As soon as questions of will or decision or reason or...

Arthur C. Clarke

Arthur C. Clarke (1917–2008)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Modern Quotations (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
130 words

...0ArthurC. Arthur C. Clarke 1917 – 2008 English science fiction writer Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic. The Lost Worlds of 2001 (1972) advanced technology indistinguishable from magic If an elderly but distinguished scientist says that something is possible he is almost certainly right, but if he says that it is impossible he is very probably wrong. in New Yorker 9 August 1969; see asimov distinguished scientist says says that something is possible says that it is impossible very probably wrong How...

William Whewell

William Whewell (1794–1866)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
177 words

...and rhyme, and changed in later editions Elementary Treatise on Mechanics (1819) ch. 4, problem 2 no force however great stretch a cord however fine horizontal line line which is accurately straight always be a bending downwards Man is the interpreter of nature, science the right interpretation. Philosophy of the Inductive Sciences (1840) Aphorism 17; see bacon man is the interpreter of nature interpreter of nature interpreter of nature science is the right...

Richard Dawkins

Richard Dawkins (1941– )   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
168 words

...0Richard Richard Dawkins 1941 –   English evolutionary biologist and science writer [ Natural selection ] has no vision, no foresight, no sight at all. If it can be said to play the role of watchmaker in nature, it is the blind watchmaker. The Blind Watchmaker (1986) ch. 1; see paley blind watchmaker blind watchmaker However many ways there may be of being alive, it is certain that there are vastly more ways of being dead. The Blind Watchmaker (1986) ch. 1 ways of being alive ways of being dead The essence of life is statistical...

William Osler

William Osler (1849–1919)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
131 words

...0William William Osler 1849 – 1919 Canadian -born physician That man can interrogate as well as observe nature, was a lesson slowly learned in his evolution. Aphorisms from his Bedside Teachings (1961) observe nature One finger in the throat and one in the rectum makes a good diagnostician. Aphorisms from his Bedside Teachings (1961) One finger in the throat one in the rectum makes a good diagnostician The natural man has only two primal passions, to get and beget. Science and Immortality (1904) ch. 2 natural man has only two two primal ...

Paul Valéry

Paul Valéry (1871–1945)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Modern Quotations (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
200 words

...0Paul Paul Valéry 1871 – 1945 French poet , critic , and man of letters A poem is never finished; it's always an accident that puts a stop to it—that is to say, gives it to the public. Littérature (1930) poem is never finished poem is never finished accident that puts a stop Science means simply the aggregate of all the recipes that are always successful. The rest is literature. Moralités (1932) science aggregate of recipes recipes always successful recipes always successful rest is literature God created man and, finding him not...

Ian McEwan

Ian McEwan (1948– )   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
215 words

...0Ian Ian McEwan 1948 –   English novelist The lost child was everyone's property. But Stephen was alone. The Child in Time (1987) ch. 1 lost child was everyone's lost child was everyone's child was everyone 's property child was everyone's property Stephen was alone Shakespeare would have grasped wave functions, Donne would have understood complementarity and relative time. They would have been excited. What richness! They would have plundered this new science for their imagery. The Child in Time (1987) ch. 2 Shakespeare would have grasped...

Herbert Spencer

Herbert Spencer (1820–1903)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
315 words

...0Herbert Herbert Spencer 1820 – 1903 English philosopher and sociologist Science is organized knowledge. Education (1861) ch. 2 science is organized knowledge organized knowledge People are beginning to see that the first requisite to success in life is to be a good animal. Education (1861) ch. 2 first requisite to success be a good animal be a good animal Absolute morality is the regulation of conduct in such a way that pain shall not be inflicted. Essays (1891) vol. 3 ‘Prison Ethics’ Absolute morality regulation of conduct pain shall...

Mao Zedong

Mao Zedong (1893–1976)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
235 words

...0Zedong Mao Zedong 1893 – 1976 Chinese statesman , effective leader of the Chinese Communist Party from the time of the Long March (1934–5), and Chairman of the Communist Party of the Chinese People's Republic 1949–76 Politics is war without bloodshed while war is politics with bloodshed. lecture, 1938, in Selected Works (1965) vol. 2 politics is war without bloodshed war without bloodshed war is politics with bloodshed Every Communist must grasp the truth, ‘Political power grows out of the barrel of a gun’. speech, 6 November 1938, in Selected...

Evelyn Waugh

Evelyn Waugh (1903–66)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Political Quotations (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
288 words

...in her choice of servants. on why he did not vote in Spectator 2 October 1959 aspire to advise advise my sovereign choice of servants it had been announced after an operation on Randolph Churchill that the trouble was ‘not malignant’: It was a typical triumph of modern science to find the only part of Randolph that was not malignant and remove it. Michael Davie (ed.) Diaries of Evelyn Waugh (1976) ‘Irregular Notes 1960–65’, March 1964 triumph of modern science triumph of modern science Randolph that was not malignant The Conservative Party have never...

John Constable

John Constable (1776–1837)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
359 words

...heart. lecture, 2 June 1836, in C. R. Leslie Memoirs of the Life of John Constable (1843) ch. 18 In Claude's landscape sunshine of the heart sunshine of the heart Painting is a science, and should be pursued as an inquiry into the laws of nature. Why, then, may not landscape painting be considered as a branch of natural philosophy, of which pictures are but the experiments? lecture at the Royal Institution, 16 June 1836, in C. R. Leslie Memoirs of the Life of John Constable (1843) ch. 18 painting is a science Painting is a science pictures are but...

Karl Popper

Karl Popper (1902–94)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
443 words

...vol. 2, ch. 21 plan for freedom make security secure There is no history of mankind, there are only many histories of all kinds of aspects of human life. And one of these is the history of political power. This is elevated into the history of the world. The Open Society and its Enemies (1945) vol. 2, ch. 25 no history of mankind no history of mankind Science must begin with myths, and with the criticism of myths. ‘The Philosophy of Science’ in C. A. Mace (ed.) British Philosophy in the Mid-Century (1957) science must begin with myths Science must...

Mao Zedong

Mao Zedong (1893–1976)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Modern Quotations (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
235 words

...0 Mao Zedong 1893 – 1976 Chinese statesman , chairman of the Communist Party of the Chinese People's Republic 1949–76 and head of state 1949–59; he was effectively leader of the Chinese Communist Party from the time of the Long March (1934–5). Despite having resigned as head of state Mao instigated the Cultural Revolution (1966–8) . On Mao: see levin Politics is war without bloodshed while war is politics with bloodshed. lecture, 1938; Selected Works (1965) vol. 2 politics is war without bloodshed war without bloodshed war is politics with...

Roger Ascham

Roger Ascham (1515–68)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
394 words

...wit will to learning as is praise Mark all mathematical heads which be only and wholly bent on these sciences, how solitary they be themselves, how unfit to live with others, and how unapt to serve the world. The Schoolmaster (1570) bk. 1 mathematical heads bent on these sciences how solitary they be To laugh, to lie, to flatter, to face Four ways in court to win men grace. The Schoolmaster (1570) bk. 1 laugh , to lie lie, to flatter four ways in court We find out but a short way, by long wandering. The Schoolmaster (1570) bk. 1 find out but a short...

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