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Heraclides Ponticus

Heraclides Ponticus  

Reference type:
Overview Page
4th cent. bc philosopher of the Academy. Born of a wealthy and aristocratic family in Heraclea Pontica, he came to Plato's Academy in Athens as a pupil of Speusippus. Like other Academics, he wrote a ...
malachite

malachite  

Mineral, Cu2CO3(OH)2; sp. gr. 3.9–4.0; hardness 3.5–4.0; monoclinic; bright green; pale green streak; in fibrous condition with a silky lustre, crystals with adamantine or vitreous lustre; crystals ...
computer

computer  

Any device capable of carrying out a sequence of operations in a defined manner. The definition of the operations is called the program. An analog computer performs computations by manipulating ...
Heraclides Ponticus

Heraclides Ponticus   Quick reference

David John Furley

Who's Who in the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
500 words

...probable that for Heraclides they represented the elementary particles of Plato's Timaeus , which unlike atoms can somehow dissolve into fragments and regroup so as to form a different element. In a way typical of 4th-cent. philosophy, Heraclides combined this interest in science with an interest in eschatology and in such shamanistic figures, real or invented, as Empedotimus, Abaris, Pythagoras , and Empedocles . In the vision of Empedotimus (frs. 96 and 98 Wehrli) the soul is described as substantial light, having its origin in the Milky Way. The...

Heraclides (1) Ponticus

Heraclides (1) Ponticus   Reference library

David John

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
644 words

...for Heraclides they represented the elementary particles of Plato's Timaeus , which unlike atoms can somehow dissolve into fragments and regroup so as to form a different element. See atomism . In a way typical of 4th-cent. philosophy, Heraclides combined this interest in science with an interest in eschatology and in such shamanistic figures, real or invented, as Empedotimus, Abaris , Pythagoras, and Empedocles . In the vision of Empedotimus (frs. 96 and 98 Wehrli) the soul is described as substantial light, having its origin in the Milky Way. The...

Hellenistic philosophy

Hellenistic philosophy   Reference library

Brad Inwood

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
818 words

...movements. The Peripatetic school founded by Aristotle's successor Theophrastus (also known as the Lyceum) continued to be a powerful philosophical force, especially in physics and the sciences; in the conventional historiography of ancient philosophy its importance is often and unjustifiably slighted during the Hellenistic period, but the impact of Peripatetics in the 2nd and 1st cents. bc was considerable, especially in ethics ( see critolaus ) and physics. A. A. Long and D. N. Sedley , The Hellenistic Philosophers (1987); K. Algra and others, ...

Hellenistic philosophy

Hellenistic philosophy   Reference library

Brad Inwood

The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
751 words

...movements. The Peripatetic school founded by Aristotle’s successor Theophrastus (also known as the Lyceum) continued to be a powerful philosophical force, especially in physics and the sciences; in the conventional historiography of ancient philosophy its importance is often and unjustifiably slighted during the Hellenistic period, but the impact of Peripatetics in the 2nd and 1st cents. bc was considerable, especially in ethics and physics. Brad...

Technology

Technology   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
4,141 words
Illustration(s):
1

...Known as the Antikythera Mechanism. ” Nature 444 (2006): 587–591. Healy, John F. Pliny the Elder on Science and Technology . Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 1999. Hodge, A. Trevor. Roman Aqueducts and Water Supply . 2nd ed. London: Duckworth, 2002. Humphrey, John W. , John P. Oleson , and Andrew N. Sherwood . Greek and Roman Technology: A Sourcebook . London and New York: Routledge, 1998. Keyser, P. T. , and G. L. Irby-Massie . “Science, Medicine, and Technology.” In The Cambridge Companion to the Hellenistic World , edited by Glenn R....

Planning

Planning   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Classical Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Classical studies
Length:
10,147 words
Illustration(s):
3

...on almost square plots (360 sq. m) joined together in rows to form insulae of various lengths. As in the Archaic strip cities, two rows of houses backed on to each other, giving an interval of 30–40 m between streets. Between the backs of the houses ran a narrow passage (0.8 m to 1.2 m wide) that served for drainage and light. At another Late Classical strip city, Kassope in Epiros, the houses were again joined together to form long insulae . The rigid grid of the residential area did not, however, extend to the agora , situated on the edge of the city,...

Architecture

Architecture   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Classical Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Classical studies
Length:
93,988 words
Illustration(s):
35

...royal palaces and royal tombs. 1. Early Helladic. 2. Middle Helladic. 3. Late Helladic. 1. E arly H elladic . Early Helladic ( eh ) settlements were usually built on low hills, preferably near or on the coast and not far from freshwater springs. The houses were often grouped around a large building positioned near the periphery of the settlement rather than in the centre. After the middle of the eh ii period coastal sites were surrounded by defensive walls, repeatedly extended and remodelled. The walls, 2.02.5 m thick, were single (e.g. Raphina, Askitario, ...

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