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Rufinus

Subject: Religion

(fl. 399–401?), commonly called the Syrian, author of a Liber de Fide, described in the only known MS as the work of Rufinus, priest of the province of Palestine. The fact that ...

Rufinus

Rufinus (fl. 399–401?)   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
93 words

... ( fl. 399–401? ), commonly called the Syrian, author of a Liber de Fide , described in the only known MS as the work of Rufinus, priest of the province of Palestine. The fact that this work is hostile to Arianism , Origen , and the doctrine of Original Sin has led to identification of its author with the Rufinus natione Syrus , said by Marius Mercator to have corrupted the theology of Pelagius , and with the deceased priest mentioned by Celestius in his trial at Carthage in...

Rufinus

Rufinus (fl. 399–401)   Reference library

Frances Young

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
266 words

... ( fl. 399–401 ?) Commonly called the Syrian, author of a Liber de Fide which is described in the only known surviving MS (St Petersburg, Public Library MS Q. v. 1. 6) as the work of Rufinus, priest of the province of Palestine. This work, formerly ascribed to Tyrannius Rufinus , is marked by hostility to Arianism , to Origen , and to the doctrine of original sin ; these features have led to the identification of the author with the Rufinus natione Syrus , said by Marius Mercator to have corrupted the theology of Pelagius ( see Pelagianism )...

Rufinus, Tyrannius

Rufinus, Tyrannius (345–411)   Reference library

Robert Evans

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
677 words

...to escape the Gothic incursions. He died in Sicily in 411. Rufinus had a lasting impact on the W. as a translator of Gk theological texts into Lat., many of which he adapted in various ways in the process of translation. Jerome and Rufinus clashed over Origen in 393, and although the friendship was restored by 397, it broke down again with Rufinus’ translation of Origen’s First Principles . This is the only complete version now surviving and was intended to vindicate Origen’s orthodoxy. Both Rufinus and Jerome wrote polemics against each other which...

Rufinus, Tyrannius

Rufinus, Tyrannius (c.345–411)   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
188 words

..., Tyrannius or Turranius ( c. 345–411 ), monk , historian , and translator . Born near Aquileia , he went to Egypt c. 373 and for some years studied at Alexandria under Didymus the Blind . In 381 he was in Jerusalem . He had a part in founding a double monastery on the Mount of Olives . He returned to Italy in 397. Though he was also an original writer, Rufinus is important mainly as a translator of Greek theological works into Latin at a time when knowledge of Greek was declining in the W. His free rendering of Origen 's De Principiis...

Rufus (Rufinus) of Capua

Rufus (Rufinus) of Capua   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Saints (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Religion
Length:
57 words

...(Rufinus) of Capua , martyr. Nothing is known of this saint (who was not a bishop), but whose Legend made him the father of a girl raised to life by Apollinaris of Ravenna. Feast: 27 August , in the Sarum calendar and in those of about fifteen English monasteries. C.M.H. , pp. 469–70; AA.SS. Aug. VI (1743),...

Rufinus

Rufinus  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(fl. 399–401?), commonly called the Syrian, author of a Liber de Fide, described in the only known MS as the work of Rufinus, priest of the province of Palestine. The fact that this work is hostile ...
Introduction to the Apocrypha

Introduction to the Apocrypha   Reference library

Martin Goodman

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
10,268 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...highly regarded by both Jews and Christians ( cf. 2 Esd 14:45–6 ) the description of them as apocryphal was rare. Other Christian writers described as ‘apocrypha’ those books which were reckoned to be spurious or heretical and thus unfit for Christian use (e.g. Athanasius and Rufinus, both in the 4th cent. ce ). The use of the term to refer to the corpus of books that now forms an appendix to the OT began with Jerome in the early fifth century. Jerome was concerned to define the limits of the OT canon and elected to exclude those books found in the Greek and...

Rufus of Capua

Rufus of Capua  

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Overview Page
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Religion
Martyr. Nothing is known of this saint (who was not a bishop), but whose Legend made him the father of a girl raised to life by Apollinaris of Ravenna. Feast: 27 August, in the Sarum calendar and in ...
Melania

Melania  

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Religion
1 ‘The Elder’ (c.342–c.410), a wealthy Roman lady. On the death of her husband, she adopted an ascetic life, left Rome, and founded a double monastery with Rufinus of Aquileia on the Mount of ...
St Chromatius

St Chromatius  

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Religion
(d. 407), Bp. of Aquileia from c.388. He was a learned scholar and tried to mediate between St Jerome and Rufinus. Some of his sermons have long been known; others have been identified in modern ...
St Anastasius I

St Anastasius I  

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Religion
(27 Nov. 399–19 Dec. 401)A Roman by birth, he had hardly become pope when he was plunged into the quarrel then raging over Origen, the outstanding but controversial 3rd-century Greek theologian. This ...
Church of Georgia

Church of Georgia  

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Overview Page
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Religion
The conversion of the Iberian king, Mirian III, probably in 334, was due to St Nino. According to Rufinus, she was a Christian captive; in Georgian tradition she is associated with Jerusalem. In the ...
St Frumentius

St Frumentius  

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Religion
(c.300–c.380), ‘Apostle of the Ethiopians’. According to Rufinus, he was captured by ‘barbarians’ on his way back from ‘India’, taken before his captors' king, and helped in governing the country. He ...
Silvia of Aquitaine

Silvia of Aquitaine  

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Overview Page
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Religion
A relative of the Roman prefect Rufinus. She was at one time thought to be the author of the ‘Pilgrimage of Egeria’ (q.v.).
Origenism

Origenism  

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Religion
The group of theories enunciated by, or attributed to, Origen. Among his earliest opponents was Methodius of Olympus, who rejected his teaching on the pre-existence of souls and his denial of the ...
Didymus the Blind

Didymus the Blind  

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Religion
(c.313–98), Alexandrian theologian. He was a staunch Nicene in trinitarian theology, but he was condemned as an Origenist at the Council of Constantinople in 553, and much of his vast literary output ...
St Pammachius

St Pammachius  

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Subject:
Religion
(c.340–410), Roman Christian and friend of St Jerome. After the death of his wife, he took the monastic habit and spent his possessions on works of piety, including the famous hospital for pilgrims ...
St Pamphilus

St Pamphilus  

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Overview Page
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Religion
(c.240–310), disciple of Origen. He was educated at Alexandria and directed a theological school at Caesarea in Palestine, where he was martyred. While imprisoned in the persecution of Maximin Daza, ...
Adamantius

Adamantius  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
The name of the orthodox protagonist in the 4th-cent. dialogue De recta in Deum fidei, and commonly supposed to be its author. It is a disputation first with two disciples of Marcion and then with ...
Sylvester

Sylvester  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(d. 335)pope. The son of a Roman called Rufinus, Sylvester became bishop of Rome in 314, soon after the Edict of Milan recognized Christianity, ended persecution against it and tolerated all ...

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