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Rufinus

Subject: Religion

(fl. 399–401?), commonly called the Syrian, author of a Liber de Fide, described in the only known MS as the work of Rufinus, priest of the province of Palestine. The fact that ...

Romans

Romans   Reference library

Cilliers Breytenbach

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Bible and Ethics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Religion, Philosophy
Length:
3,212 words

...texts ended with 14:23 . One of the earliest manuscripts, P46, has Romans 1:1—15:33 + 16:25–27 + 16:1–23 . Another, codex B, has 1:1—16:23 + 25–27 . (For details, cf. Aland, 1979 .) Yet, when we take chapter 16 as part of the original letter), we can, as Origen did (Rufinus, Orig. Comm. Rom . I.1.80–92), regard Corinth as the place of origin of Romans, for Gaius is among those who send their greetings to the Romans ( Rom 16:23 ). According to common opinion, Paul set sail from Corinth in the spring of 56 c.e. and before he left, he dictated...

Ethiopia and Ethiopianism

Ethiopia and Ethiopianism   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of African Thought

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Regional and National History, Philosophy
Length:
2,109 words

...Court of King Ezana at some point ca. 340 c.e . (This makes Ethiopia the oldest continually Christian country apart, one might argue, from Armenia.) Rufinus’s (ca. 345–410 c.e .) account of the introduction of Christianity to the Aksumite court is important given that it is virtually contemporary with the events it describes, being written around 410 c.e. , some sixty years after the events it describes. Rufinus’s account tells how two Syrian brothers from Tyre, Frumentius and Aedesius, were rescued from a shipwreck on the Red Sea coast and taken to the court...

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