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Rufinus

Subject: Religion

(fl. 399–401?), commonly called the Syrian, author of a Liber de Fide, described in the only known MS as the work of Rufinus, priest of the province of Palestine. The fact that ...

Valerie

Valerie   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Chaucer

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

...an anti-feminist tract which was included in the De nugis curialium (‘Courtiers trifles’, 1180–93 ), a collection of entertaining tales by Walter Map , archdeacon of Oxford, but circulated separately earlier. In it ‘Valerius’, a fictional character, argues against his friend Rufinus's plan to marry. The work is included in Jankyn's (4) book of ‘wicked wives’ (III.671), and the ‘Valerie’ mentioned in The Legend of Good Women (G 280) is probably its...

medicine

medicine   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Chaucer

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

... of Phisik's authorities (I.429–34). Others were ‘Deyscorides, and eek Rufus’: Dioscorides had been available in Latin from the 7th c., and this is true of Rufus of Ephesus , but there is a distinct possibility that Chaucer had in mind not Rufus but a medical herbal by Rufinus ( fl. 1290 ), in which Dioscorides is repeatedly quoted at length. The authorities Hippocrates (or pseudo- Hippocrates ) and Galen were translated in some measure at every historical phase. In the universities, the emphasis changed yet again in the direction of speculative...

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