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Rufinus

Subject: Religion

(fl. 399–401?), commonly called the Syrian, author of a Liber de Fide, described in the only known MS as the work of Rufinus, priest of the province of Palestine. The fact that ...

Rufinus

Rufinus   Reference library

Timothy E. Gregory

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
198 words

... (῾Πουφι̑νος), praetorian prefect and adviser of Theodosios I and Arkadios ; born Elusa, Gaul, died outside Constantinople 27 Nov. 395 . He was magister officiorum 388–92 and used his tenure to increase the importance of that office. In 390 he urged Theodosios to admit his error in the massacre of citizens in the hippodrome of Thessalonike . He was appointed consul for 392. Rufinus was an ambitious and ruthless politician; he hoped to marry his daughter to Arkadios. When Theodosios went to the West in 394 , he left Rufinus as the principal...

Rufinus of Aquileia

Rufinus of Aquileia   Reference library

Barry Baldwin

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
277 words

... of Aquileia , more fully Tyrannius Rufinus , Latin writer and translator; born at Concordia near Aquileia ca. 345 , died Messina 410. After studies in Rome, where he met Jerome , Rufinus went to Egypt ca. 372 , thence to Jerusalem, where a decade later he founded a monastery on the Mount of Olives with Melania the Elder . In the interim, he had studied at Alexandria, where he was captivated by the Origenism of Didymos the Blind . Returning to Aquileia in 397 , he devoted his last years largely to Latin translations of the Greek fathers. The...

Rufinus

Rufinus  

(῾Πουφι̑νος), praetorian prefect and adviser of Theodosios I and Arkadios; born Elusa, Gaul, died outside Constantinople 27 Nov. 395.He was magister officiorum 388–92 and used his tenure to increase ...
Epi Ton Deeseon

Epi Ton Deeseon  

(ὁ ἐπὶ τω̑ν δεήσεων), official whose duty was to receive petitions addressed to the emperor and to answer them. He is usually considered the successor of the late Roman magister ...
Rouphinianai

Rouphinianai  

(῾Πουφινιαναί), or Rufinianae, Asiatic suburb of Constantinople, located on the Sea of Marmara southeast of Chalcedon. The area, formerly referred to as Drys (“the Oak”), took its name from the ...
Skariphos

Skariphos  

(σκάριφος), a sketch or, in architecture, a ground plan. The 5th-C. architect Rufinus is said in the vita of Porphyrios of Gaza to have based his outline (thesis) for the ...
Palladios

Palladios  

(Παλλάδιος), writer, bishop of Helenopolis in Bithynia (ca.400–406), bishop of Aspuna in Galatia (from ca.412); born Galatia ca.363, died Aspuna ca.431.A pupil of Evagrios Pontikos, he spent the ...
Gainas

Gainas  

(Γαϊναα̑ς), general of Gothic origin; born north of the Danube, died in the northern Balkans before Jan. 401.Having begun his career as a common soldier, he was one of ...
Arkadios

Arkadios  

(᾽Αρκάδιος), emperor in the East (395–408); born Constantinople 377/8, died Constantinople 1 May 408.The son of Theodosios I and Aelia Flaccilla, he became augustus in 383. Left as regent ...
Eutropios

Eutropios  

(Εὑτρόπιος), favorite of Arkadios, born near the Persian frontier, died Chalcedon Aug.? 399.An emancipated slave and eunuch, he entered the service of Theodosios I and became the guardian of ...
Gelasius

Gelasius  

(d. 395), Bp. of Caesarea in Palestine from c.367. As a convinced Nicene, he was ousted from his see for a time in the reign of Valens. He wrote a continuation of the ‘Ecclesiastical History’ of ...
Gelasius of Cyzicus

Gelasius of Cyzicus  

The name given to the 5th-cent. author of a ‘Church History’ or ‘Syntagma’, a collection of the Acta of the Council of Nicaea (325), designed to refute the Monophysite claim that their faith was ...
Spyridon

Spyridon  

(d. c.348), Bp. of Tremithus in Cyprus. He was a peasant who, according to tradition, had suffered in the Diocletianic persecution. As bishop he is said to have attended the Council of Nicaea; he was ...
St Benedict

St Benedict  

(c. 480–c. 550),Italian hermit. He established a monastery at Monte of Chancery and his Regula Monachorum (known as the Rule of St Benedict) formed the basis of Western monasticism. His feast day is ...
Skariphos

Skariphos   Reference library

Anthony Cutler

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
117 words

...(σκάριφος), a sketch or, in architecture, a ground plan. The 5th-C. architect Rufinus is said in the vita of Porphyrios of Gaza to have based his outline ( thesis ) for the cathedral of Gaza on a skariphos sent from Constantinople by the empress Eudoxia. Plans were often transmitted in visions, such as the one in which St. Martha dictated to a monk the scheme for her chapel at the Wondrous Mountain ( AASS May 5:416F). By the 14th C. skariphos had come to mean an artist's brush, as in an epigram of Nikephoros Kallistos Xanthopoulos on an...

Rouphinianai

Rouphinianai   Reference library

Alice-Mary Talbot

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
273 words

...referred to as Drys (“the Oak”), took its name from the praetorian prefect Rufinus , who undertook a building program there in the late 4th C. At the time of his conversion to Christianity, Rufinus constructed a church dedicated to Peter and Paul (the Apostoleion). In 393 he founded a separate monastery nearby where he installed Egyptian monks to serve as the clergy for the Apostoleion. This original phase of the monastery was very brief, since it was abandoned after Rufinus's murder in 395 . The monastery quickly fell into disrepair but was restored...

assisi

assisi   Reference library

Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
445 words
Illustration(s):
1

...by Paul III . In the city's traditional system, the chapter of St Rufinus , established in the cathedral church built by Bishop Hugo between 1019 and 1028 , seems (at least according to the magnificent archives, unedited) to have had more importance than the bishop . On the Hugonian edifice arose the new cathedral, begun in 1140 but completed only in the first years of the 13th century. It was there that Frederick II was baptized. In the city, the chapter of St Rufinus concurred, with the episcopal clientele and the imperial boni homines ,...

education, schools of law

education, schools of law   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
256 words

...Doctors’ — Bulgarus Bolgarini , Martinus Gosia , Hugo da Porte Ravennata , and Jacobus . *Gratian himself probably taught there. His * Decretum became a standard canon law textbook expanded with *commentaries by famous Bolognese teachers like Paucapalea , Rolandus , Rufinus , and Huguccio . Teaching law was a private enterprise, started usually by renting a house with a hall large enough for lectures, by advertising courses, teaching, advising clients, acting as a judge, and even renting spare rooms to students. After Bologna, similar schools...

Arkadios

Arkadios   Reference library

Timothy E. Gregory

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
239 words

...his father departed to fight the usurper Eugenius , he shared power with his brother Honorius after the death of Theodosios the following year. Apparently weak-willed and averse to action ( Zosim . 5.12.1; Philostorg., HE 11.3), Arkadios was dominated by others, first by Rufinus ( 395–96 ), then Eutropios ( 396–400 ), his wife Eudoxia ( 400–04 ), and finally the praetorian prefect Anthemios ( 404–08 ). During Arkadios's reign Alaric ravaged the Balkans, while the Huns broke through the Caspian Gates and the Isaurians disturbed eastern Asia...

Gelasios of Caesarea

Gelasios of Caesarea   Reference library

Barry Baldwin

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
212 words

...of authors do cite him. Photios ( Bibl. , cod.89) distinguishes two or three Gelasioses of Caesarea and lists their works, among which was the Church History , which ends with the death of Constantine the Great . Its relationship to the last two books of the continuation by Rufinus of Aquileia is much disputed (J. Schamp, PBR 6 [ 1987 ] 146–52; idem, Byzantion 57 [ 1987 ] 360–90). Only fragments survive, as is the case with his Exposition of the Symbol , possibly similar to the catechetical lectures of his uncle Cyril. A polemic Against the...

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