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Richard Theodore Ely

Subject: Philosophy

(1854–1943)

Richard T. Ely was born on 13 April 1854 in Ripley, New York, and died on 4 October 1943 in Old Lyme, Connecticut. He grew up in Fredonia in ...

Synesis

Synesis   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
784 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

... actively considering the race.” Cathleen Decker , “New Welfare Law Should Be Amended, Boxer Says,” L.A. Times , 16 Jan. 1997 , at A3. • “Of these 3,000, however, just a small proportion are enrolled in courses such as Foundations of Health or Human Sexuality.” Richard A. Kaye & Theodore Markus , “AIDS Teaching Should Not Be Limited to the Young,” USA Today (Mag.), 1 Sept. 1997 , at 50. • “A handful of them are world-class operations.” Linda DuVal , “World-Class Spas Let Visitors Indulge Themselves and Relax,” Gaz. Telegraph (Colo. Springs),...

Superstitions

Superstitions   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
2,047 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...from Latin, and in the Latin language prepositions do usually stand before the words they govern. But Latin is not English. In English prepositions have been used as terminal words in a sentence since the days of Chaucer, and in that position they are completely idiomatic.” Theodore M. Bernstein , Miss Thistlebottom's Hobgoblins: The Careful Writer's Guide to the Taboos, Bugbears, and Outmoded Rules of English Usage 177 ( 1971 ). • “Ending a sentence with a preposition can be as dangerous as stepping on a crack in a sidewalk.” Allan Metcalf , “Double or...

infer

infer   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
378 words

...to reason from premises to a conclusion”—e.g.: • “We get no sense of the man himself from this book except what we can infer from the biographical facts that Mr. Magida presents.” John B. Judis , “Maximum Leader,” N.Y. Times , 18 Aug. 1996 , § 7, at 24. • “FBI spokesmen have told us that we are not to infer that Richard is guilty of anything merely because he is a suspect, among others.” Larry Maddry , “FBI Should Charge Jewell or Cut Him Some Slack,” Virginian-Pilot (Norfolk), 26 Aug. 1996 , at E1. • “Research shows that a daily glass or two...

bar

bar   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
435 words

...well <a bar to all claims> . Debar , a somewhat archaic formal word , means “to preclude from having or doing (a thing), or entering (a realm of activity).” It is more common in BrE than in AmE—e.g.: • “His enemies . . . had accused him of being a greengrocer by trade, something to be ashamed of, they had implied, which debarred him from public life.” Richard Lambert , “The Goldsmith File,” Fin. Times , 19 Oct. 1996 , at 7. • “A criminal conviction of the firm could bring licensing problems in some states and might result in efforts to debar ...

moot

moot   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
730 words

...case proposed for discussion in a “moot” of law students (i.e., the word was once a noun). In U.S. law schools, students practice arguing hypothetical cases before appellate courts in moot court . From that sense of moot derived the extended sense “of no practical importance; hypothetical; academic.” This shift in meaning occurred about 1900 <because the question has already become moot, we need not decide it> . Today, in AmE, that is the predominant sense of moot . Theodore M. Bernstein and other writers have called this sense of the word...

adverbs

adverbs   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of American Usage and Style

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
671 words

...], and immediately precedes the principal verb if the verb is in the passive voice [e.g., the house can be quickly built ].” Josephine Turck Baker , Correct English: Complete Grammar and Drill Book , 1938 ). • “The truth is that more often than not the proper and natural place for an adverb is between the parts of a compound verb” ( Theodore M. Bernstein , The Careful Writer , 1965 ). • “With a compound verb—that is, one made with an auxiliary and a main verb—the adverb comes between auxiliary and main verb ( He will probably telephone before starting / I...

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