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Richard Theodore Ely

Subject: Philosophy

(1854–1943)

Richard T. Ely was born on 13 April 1854 in Ripley, New York, and died on 4 October 1943 in Old Lyme, Connecticut. He grew up in Fredonia in ...

Synesis

Synesis   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
784 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

... actively considering the race.” Cathleen Decker , “New Welfare Law Should Be Amended, Boxer Says,” L.A. Times , 16 Jan. 1997 , at A3. • “Of these 3,000, however, just a small proportion are enrolled in courses such as Foundations of Health or Human Sexuality.” Richard A. Kaye & Theodore Markus , “AIDS Teaching Should Not Be Limited to the Young,” USA Today (Mag.), 1 Sept. 1997 , at 50. • “A handful of them are world-class operations.” Linda DuVal , “World-Class Spas Let Visitors Indulge Themselves and Relax,” Gaz. Telegraph (Colo. Springs),...

Superstitions

Superstitions   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
2,047 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...from Latin, and in the Latin language prepositions do usually stand before the words they govern. But Latin is not English. In English prepositions have been used as terminal words in a sentence since the days of Chaucer, and in that position they are completely idiomatic.” Theodore M. Bernstein , Miss Thistlebottom's Hobgoblins: The Careful Writer's Guide to the Taboos, Bugbears, and Outmoded Rules of English Usage 177 ( 1971 ). • “Ending a sentence with a preposition can be as dangerous as stepping on a crack in a sidewalk.” Allan Metcalf , “Double or...

infer

infer   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
378 words

...to reason from premises to a conclusion”—e.g.: • “We get no sense of the man himself from this book except what we can infer from the biographical facts that Mr. Magida presents.” John B. Judis , “Maximum Leader,” N.Y. Times , 18 Aug. 1996 , § 7, at 24. • “FBI spokesmen have told us that we are not to infer that Richard is guilty of anything merely because he is a suspect, among others.” Larry Maddry , “FBI Should Charge Jewell or Cut Him Some Slack,” Virginian-Pilot (Norfolk), 26 Aug. 1996 , at E1. • “Research shows that a daily glass or two...

bar

bar   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
435 words

...well <a bar to all claims> . Debar , a somewhat archaic formal word , means “to preclude from having or doing (a thing), or entering (a realm of activity).” It is more common in BrE than in AmE—e.g.: • “His enemies . . . had accused him of being a greengrocer by trade, something to be ashamed of, they had implied, which debarred him from public life.” Richard Lambert , “The Goldsmith File,” Fin. Times , 19 Oct. 1996 , at 7. • “A criminal conviction of the firm could bring licensing problems in some states and might result in efforts to debar ...

moot

moot   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
730 words

...case proposed for discussion in a “moot” of law students (i.e., the word was once a noun). In U.S. law schools, students practice arguing hypothetical cases before appellate courts in moot court . From that sense of moot derived the extended sense “of no practical importance; hypothetical; academic.” This shift in meaning occurred about 1900 <because the question has already become moot, we need not decide it> . Today, in AmE, that is the predominant sense of moot . Theodore M. Bernstein and other writers have called this sense of the word...

Spelling Reform

Spelling Reform   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to the English Language (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Language reference, History of English, Linguistics
Length:
1,878 words

...interested in the development of a phonetic alphabet not only for academic purposes but also as a possible precursor of a reformed spelling system for English. New Spelling At the beginning of the 20c, the cause of spelling reform was taken up for a time by the US President Theodore Roosevelt and sponsored by the industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie . In 1908 , the British Simplified Spelling Society, now the english spelling society , was founded, chiefly with the aim of devising a reformed writing system based on the Roman alphabet, in the...

Usage Guidance and Criticism

Usage Guidance and Criticism   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to the English Language (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Language reference, History of English, Linguistics
Length:
2,465 words

...The doyen of usage columnists in the US in the late 20c is William Safire of the New York Times , whose articles are widely syndicated. American journalism has also been the foundation of systematic usage and style guides, notably Theodore Bernstein ’s The Careful Writer ( 1965 ) and William Strunk Jr. and E. B. White ’s The elements of style , known affectionately as ‘the little book’ (3rd edition, 1979 ; earlier editions 1959 , 1972 ). In Britain, Philip Howard in The Times , John Silverlight in The Observer , and Robert...

African-American rhetoric

African-American rhetoric   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Rhetoric

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Language reference, Linguistics
Length:
9,882 words

...source for the secular themes in the rhetoric of the black revolution” ( 1969 , p. 47). James L. Golden and Richard D. Rieke ( 1971 ) critically assess his influence as well as his oratory, juxtaposing his discourse and philosophy to that of his contemporary Booker T. Washington at several points in their study, even while suggesting that both men were “assimilationists.” Other rhetorical scholars have followed a similar line of inquiry. Thomas E. Harris and Patrick C. Kennicott ( 1972 ) begin their critique of Washington's rhetoric with an observation...

Public speaking

Public speaking   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Rhetoric

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Language reference, Linguistics
Length:
4,814 words

...was riveted on the great orators in Congress, the president occupied center stage during most of the twentieth century, a development that reflected the emergence of what has become known as the rhetorical presidency (Tulis, Rhetorical Presidency , Princeton, 1987 ). Before Theodore Roosevelt ( 1858–1919 ) transformed the office into a “bully pulpit,” chief executives usually deferred to the legislative prerogatives of Congress and seldom took to the hustings in behalf of specific policy initiatives, domestic or foreign. Even presidential candidates...

Campaigns

Campaigns   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Rhetoric

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Language reference, Linguistics
Length:
4,351 words

...candidates to free themselves from the constraints of live performance. Until the emergence of radio in the 1920s, politicians were largely confined to public speeches in front of live audiences, one-on-one campaigning, appearances at parades, and quotations in newspapers. Theodore Roosevelt ( 1858–1919 ) had set the standard for that earlier model when, as assistant secretary of the Navy and later as president, he arranged for photographers and journalists to follow him on his hunts, nature expeditions, and military exploits. Radio, however, had the...

Politics

Politics   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Rhetoric

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Language reference, Linguistics
Length:
13,279 words

...strategies in the twentieth century. In “The Man with the Muckrake” ( 1906 ) speech, President Theodore Roosevelt cited mainly social rules requiring truthfulness and fairness in order to urge journalists to be more objective. “Honesty,” he says, challenging journalists to be not just honest but also unbiased, “can be no respecter of persons.” In 1969 , Vice President Spiro Agnew claimed that a television commentator who was critical of President Richard Nixon had made a “partisan assault” that “had the apparent dignity of an objective statement.” In...

Invention

Invention   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Rhetoric

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Language reference, Linguistics
Length:
11,654 words

...art to provide the discipline for investigating the structure of facts and the interrelations of facts” (p. 39). McKeon, Richard . “ Arts of Invention and Arts of Memory. ” Critical Inquiry 1 (1975), pp. 723–739. “This analysis and history of places … has exhibited them in their multiplicity and interaction revivifying the past and preparing a novel future” (p. 739). Zyskind, Harold . “ A Case Study in Philosophic Rhetoric: Theodore Roosevelt. ” Philosophy and Rhetoric 1 (1968), pp. 228–254. Shows concretely how rhetoric, which can argue either side of...

adverbs

adverbs   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of American Usage and Style

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
671 words

...], and immediately precedes the principal verb if the verb is in the passive voice [e.g., the house can be quickly built ].” Josephine Turck Baker , Correct English: Complete Grammar and Drill Book , 1938 ). • “The truth is that more often than not the proper and natural place for an adverb is between the parts of a compound verb” ( Theodore M. Bernstein , The Careful Writer , 1965 ). • “With a compound verb—that is, one made with an auxiliary and a main verb—the adverb comes between auxiliary and main verb ( He will probably telephone before starting / I...

Bibliography, Selected

Bibliography, Selected   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
54,714 words

...or, The Stranger's Guide to the Metropolis (London 1880) Hook, Theodore E. Gilbert Gurney (London 1836) —— Sayings and Doings 3 vols. (London 1824, 1825) Hooke, Nathaniel The Sarah-Ad, or, A Flight for Fame (London 1742) Hooker, Richard M*A*S*H (New York 1968) [London 2002] Hooper, Charles Brief Authority (London 1960) Hooper, Johnson J. Adventures of Captain Simon Suggs (Philadelphia 1845) [Philadelphia 1851] Hoover, J. Edgar Persons in Hiding (Boston 1938) Hope, Anthony (i.e. Sir Anthony Hope Hawkins) The Dolly Dialogues (London 1894)...

Pseudonyms

Pseudonyms   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... John Creasey ( 1908–73 ) generously exemplifies the phenomenon, with two dozen pen names for different novels and genres: Gordon Ashe , Margaret Cooke , M.E. Cooke , Norman Deane , Elise Fecamps , Robert Caine Frazer , Patrick Gill , Michael Halliday , Charles Hogarth , Brian Hope , Colin Hughes , Kyle Hunt , Abel Mann , Peter Manton , J.J. Marric , James Marsden , Richard Martin , Rodney Mattheson , Antony Morton , Ken Ranger , William K. Reilly , Tex Riley , Henry St John and Jeremy York . Pseudonyms can be counted in...

White

White   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...as rajah (‘Raja Brooke’) from 1841 to 1941 . White Rose, The Used as a badge by Richard, Duke of York ( 1411–60 ), and derived from his Mortimer ancestors. It was one of the numerous badges used by his son Edward IV and was adopted by his descendants, but Richard III ’s badge was the white boar. It was also adopted by the jacobites as an emblem of the old pretender , because his adherents were obliged to abet him sub rosa . Cecily Neville , wife of Richard , Duke of York, and granddaughter of John of Gaunt, was known as the White Rose of Raby....

Saint

Saint   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...Vitalis Colt: St Medard Cow: St Berlinda, St Bridget, St Modwena, St Perpetua Crocodile: St Helenus, St Theodore Crow: St Vincent Cup and serpent (symbolizing poison detected by): St Benedict, St James of Marchia, St John a Facundo, St John the Evangelist Dagger (as instrument of martyrdom): St Agnes, St Canute, St Edward, St Irene, St Kilian, St Olave, St Solange Deer: St Henry Devil or Devils: in Christian art the Devil is shown both tormenting the saints (e.g. throwing St Euphrasia down a well, disturbing the prayers of St Cuthbert or St Madalberte) and being...

Pseudonyms

Pseudonyms   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Modern Phrase & Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

... John Creasey ( 1908–73 ) generously exemplifies the phenomenon, with two dozen pen-names for different novels and genres: Gordon Ashe , Margaret Cooke , M.E. Cooke , Norman Deane , Elise Fecamps , Robert Caine Frazer , Patrick Gill , Michael Halliday , Charles Hogarth , Brian Hope , Colin Hughes , Kyle Hunt , Abel Mann , Peter Manton , J.J. Marric , James Marsden , Richard Martin , Rodney Mattheson , Antony Morton , Ken Ranger , William K. Reilly , Tex Riley , Henry St John and Jeremy York . Pseudonyms can be counted in...

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