You are looking at 1-10 of 10 entries  for:

  • All: Richard Theodore Ely x
  • Literary studies - poetry and poets x
clear all

View:

Overview

Richard Theodore Ely

Subject: Philosophy

(1854–1943)

Richard T. Ely was born on 13 April 1854 in Ripley, New York, and died on 4 October 1943 in Old Lyme, Connecticut. He grew up in Fredonia in ...

Chant Royal

Chant Royal   Reference library

A. Preminger and B. Rowland

The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

...by the 15th c., its popularity waned. Clément Marot composed four chant royaux , mainly on religious themes. The Pléiade banned the form, but in the 19th and 20th cs., attempts were made to revive it by Théodore de Banville and others. Some of these, like Deschamps, used it for satirical commentary as well as for elevated themes; others, e.g., Richard Le Gallienne , reduced it to vers de société . Paul Valéry remarked that, by comparison, the sonnet is child’s play. Bibliography Kastner; Patterson; L. Stewart , “The Chant Royal , a Study of the...

Ballade

Ballade   Reference library

A. Preminger, T.V.F. Brogan, and C. Scott

The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

...stanza. Beyond their practice, it never established itself firmly. In the later 19th c., the so-called Eng. Parnassians ( Edmund Gosse , Austin Dobson , Andrew Lang ; see parnassianism ) and poets of the 1890s ( W. E. Henley , Richard Le Gallienne , Arthur Symons ) revived the form with enthusiasm, inspired by the example of Théodore de Banville ( Trente-six Ballades joyeuses à la manière de Villon , 1873 ), who gave a new impetus to the ballade equally among fellow Parnassian and decadent poets in France ( François Coppée , Paul Verlaine , Jean...

Psalms, Metrical

Psalms, Metrical   Reference library

H. Hamlin

The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

...in New England. Following Protestant practice, metrical psalms caught on later in Catholic countries, incl. Italy and Spain, though for private devotion rather than congregational singing. Ger. (Luther, Johann Walter ), Dutch ( Jan Utenhove ), and esp. Fr. (Clément Marot, Théodore de Beza) metrical psalms used in churches were often written in sophisticated verse. In England, a simple ballad meter (and close variants) became standard for singing-psalms, esp. following publication of the immensely popular psalter versified by Thomas Sternhold and John...

Alliteration

Alliteration   Reference library

P. G. Adams and T. Cable

The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies - poetry and poets
Length:
1,804 words

...group of more recent poets who, learning from Hopkins and Thomas Hardy , have depended very much on phonic echoes, esp. in unrhymed verse. Among these are Wilfred Owen and Dylan Thomas in Britain and Robinson Jeffers , Marianne Moore , Hart Crane , Theodore Roethke , Robert Lowell , Richard Wilbur , and Mary Oliver in the U.S. Crane, typical of this group, echoes not only initial consonants but important vowels in almost every line—“Sun-silt rippled them / Asunder” (“Repose of Rivers”) and “Rail-squatters ranged in nomad raillery” ( The Bridge...

Avant-Garde Poetics

Avant-Garde Poetics   Reference library

M. Perloff

The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies - poetry and poets
Length:
3,459 words

...rest of the soldiers. In the arts, the first use of the term avant-garde is usually attributed to the Fr. historian Étienne Pasquier, who wrote in 1596 , “A glorious war was then being waged against ignorance, a war whose avant-garde was constituted by [Maurice] Scève , [Théodore] Bèze , and [Jacques] Peletier ; or, to put it another way, these men were the avantcoureurs [forerunners] of the other poets.” From the first, then, avant-garde referred to the members of a cohort who were ahead of their time, who led the way for the less daring soldiers...

Hermeneutics

Hermeneutics   Reference library

V. Hösle

The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies - poetry and poets
Length:
4,845 words

...on the other hand. Analytical philosophy has for a long time shunned hermeneutics. When Richard Rorty took his leave from analytical philosophy, which he regarded as hopelessly committed to representationalism, he proposed hermeneutics as an alternative: not, however, as an alternative foundational enterprise but as a form of conversation and edification. But it is important to understand that hermeneutics as such is not committed to antifoundationalism, as we find it, e.g., in Stanley Fish’s work: only its post-Heideggerian turn is. After Donald Davidson ...

Baroque

Baroque   Reference library

C. Johnson

The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies - poetry and poets
Length:
4,989 words

...theme, while a sonnet such as “La bella schiava” fashions compact meraviglie (wonders) recalling Martial. Echoing Seneca and Plutarch, Donne hyperbolically anatomizes the world’s decline in the Anniversaries , even as he glimpses its Christian redemption. Imitating Lucan, Théodore-Agrippa d’Aubigné laments the slaughter of his fellow Protestants in Les Tragiques but revels in his discovery of the rhetorical means to amplify such violence. In sum, Spitzer’s description of Sp. baroque lit. as riddled by the conflict between Weltsucht and Weltflucht ...

Tragedy

Tragedy   Reference library

T. J. Reiss

The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies - poetry and poets
Length:
7,041 words

...would contribute to making the new Eur. cultures equal to those of antiquity ( see renaissance poetics ). At the same time, esp. in France, tragedies became tools in real political battles: Protestant and Catholic hostilities occurred on stage as well as on the battlefield. Théodore de Beza’s 1550 Abraham sacrifiant was thus answered by Étienne Jodelle’s 1552 Cléopǎtre captive , praising Henri II and equating him with Octavian. In Spain, the tragedies of honor by dramatists such as Lope de Vega and Calderón reflected both the glory of imperial...

England, Poetry of

England, Poetry of   Reference library

K. Davis, E. Johnson, E. H. Sagaser, J. Keith, E. Gray, and C. D. Blanton

The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies - poetry and poets
Length:
19,050 words

...Poetry Online, http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca . Old English. Anthologies: Anglo-Saxon Poetic Records , ed. G. Krapp and E. Dobbie , 6 v. (1931–53); An Anthology of Old English Poetry , trans. C. W. Kennedy (1960); Poems of Wisdom and Learning in Old English , ed. and trans. T. A. Shippey (1976); The Old English Riddles of the Exeter Book , ed. C. Williamson (1977); A Choice of Anglo-Saxon Verse , ed. and trans. Richard Hamer (1981); Anglo-Saxon Poetry , trans. S.A.J. Bradley (1982); Old English Minor Heroic Poems , ed. Joyce Hill (1983); The...

United States, Poetry of the

United States, Poetry of the   Reference library

M. Cohen and M. Davidson

The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies - poetry and poets
Length:
15,146 words

...for a stock-taking that would seize upon the liberating advantages of Fr. vers libre and the derived Anglo-Am. free verse while curbing their excesses. Writers born in the first two decades of the 20th c.— Theodore Roethke ( 1908–63 ), Elizabeth Bishop ( 1911–79 ), John Berryman ( 1914–72 ), Jarrell, Lowell, Howard Nemerov ( 1920–91 ), and Richard Wilbur (b. 1921 )—turned away from free verse and developed a technically complex, rhetorically difficult poetry modeled on the values of the New Critics, esp. the work of metaphysical poets such as John...

View: