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Perpendicular

Denoting the latest stage of English Gothic church architecture, prevalent from the late 14th to mid 16th centuries and characterized by broad arches, elaborate fan vaulting, and large ...

Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac

Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac (1902–84)   Reference library

Francis Crick

Oxford Dictionary of Scientific Quotations

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
484 words

...it to an observation. We are observing whether it is polarised parallel or perpendicular to the optic axis. The effect of making the observation is to force the photon entirely into the state of perpendicular polarisation. It has to make a sudden jump from being partly in each of these two states to being entirely in one or other of them. Which of the two states it will jump into cannot be predicted, but is governed only by probability laws. If it jumps into the perpendicular state it passes through the crystal and appears on the other side preserving this...

Osbert Lancaster

Osbert Lancaster (1908–86)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
103 words

...Osbert Lancaster 1908 – 86 English writer and cartoonist Fan-vaulting…from an aesthetic standpoint frequently belongs to the ‘Last-supper-carved-on-a-peach-stone’ class of masterpiece. Pillar to Post (1938) ‘Perpendicular’ fan -vaulting…from an aesthetic last -supper-carved-on-a-peach-stone Last- supper -carved-on-a-peach-stone Last-supper-carved-on-a- peach -stone All over the country the latest and most scientific methods of mass-production are being utilized to turn out a stream of old oak beams, leaded window-panes and small discs...

Handwriting

Handwriting   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Humorous Quotations (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
282 words

...perhaps used in a dramatization of The Housemaster (1938) dawn of legibility in his handwriting inability to spell of Foreign Office handwriting: Iron railings leaning out of the perpendicular. Lord Palmerston 1784 – 1865 British statesman : J. A. Gere and John Sparrow (eds.) Geoffrey Madan's Notebooks (1981) Iron railings out of the perpendicular No individual word was decipherable, but, with a bold reader, groups could be made to conform to a scheme based on probabilities. Edith Œ. Somerville 1858 – 1949 and Martin Ross 1862...

Dance

Dance   Quick reference

Oxford Essential Quotations (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
573 words

...I wish I could shimmy like my sister Kate, She shivers like the jelly on a plate. Armand J. Piron 1888 – 1943 American jazz musician ‘Shimmy like Kate’ (1919 song) [ Dancing is ] a perpendicular expression of a horizontal desire. George Bernard Shaw 1856 – 1950 Irish dramatist in New Statesman 23 March 1962 [ dancing is ] a perpendicular perpendicular expression of horizontal horizontal desire Let us read, and let us dance—two amusements that will never do any harm to the world. Voltaire 1694 – 1778 French writer and philosopher...

Francis Hall

Francis Hall (d. 1833)   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of American Quotations (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
188 words

...to cultivate the crop, led to the creation of the city Travels in Canada and the United States in 1816 and 1817 , 1818 On our left, the bold features of nature [the Palisades] rise as in the days of yore, unimpaired, unchangeable; grey cliffs, like aged battlements, tower perpendicularly from the water to their height of several hundred feet. Lt. Hall, an English visitor, traveled up the Hudson Travels in Canada and the United States in 1816 and 1817 ,...

Dance

Dance   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Humorous Quotations (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
542 words

...the Guard Republican can, If Van Gogh and Matisse and Cézanne can, Baby, you can can-can too. Cole Porter 1891 – 1964 American songwriter : ‘Can-Can’ (1953) you can can-can too [ Dancing is ] a perpendicular expression of a horizontal desire. George Bernard Shaw 1856 – 1950 Irish dramatist : in New Statesman 23 March 1962 perpendicular expression horizontal desire horizontal desire ‘Can you dance?’ said the girl. Lancelot gave a short, amused laugh. He was a man who never let his left hip know what his right hip was doing. P. G. ...

Nehemiah Grew

Nehemiah Grew (1641–1712)   Reference library

Francis Crick

Oxford Dictionary of Scientific Quotations

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
361 words

... is fed, is duly prepared in its several Parts ...How not only their Sizes , but also their Shapes are so exceedingly various...Then to inquire, What should be the reason of their various Motions ; that the Root should descend ; that its descent should sometimes be perpendicular , sometimes more level : That the Trunk doth ascend , and that the ascent thereof, as to the space of Time wherein it is made, is of different measures...Further, what may be the Causes as of the Seasons of their Growth ; so of the Periods of their Lives ; some...

Pieter Zeeman

Pieter Zeeman (1865–1943)   Reference library

Francis Crick

Oxford Dictionary of Scientific Quotations

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
328 words

... 1865 – 1943 Dutch physicist In August, 1896, I exposed the sodium flame to large magnetic forces by placing it between the poles of a strong electromagnet. Again I studied the radiation of the flame by means of Rowland's mirror, the observations being made in the direction perpendicular to the lines of force. Each line, which in the absence of the effect of the magnetic forces was very sharply defined, was now broadened. This indicated that not only the original oscillations, but also others with greater and again others with smaller periods of oscillation...

Eratosthenes

Eratosthenes (c.276––c.194 bc)   Reference library

Francis Crick

Oxford Dictionary of Scientific Quotations

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
398 words

...– – c. 194 bc Greek writer, astronomer and poet In comparison with the great size of the earth the protrusion of mountains is not sufficient to deprive it of its spherical shape or to invalidate measurements based on its spherical shape. For Eratosthenes shows that the perpendicular distance from the highest mountain tops to the lowest regions is ten stades [ c. 5,000–5,500 feet]. This he shows with the help of dioptras which measure magnitudes at a distance. Simplicius, Commentary On Aristotle's De Caelo , pp. 549.32–550.4 (Heiberg). Quoted in Morris R....

George Bernard Shaw

George Bernard Shaw (1856–1950)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Modern Quotations (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
1,666 words

...produce the most perfect child’: What if the child inherits my body and your brains? Hesketh Pearson Bernard Shaw (1942) child inherits my body my body and your brains my body and your brains [ Dancing is ] a perpendicular expression of a horizontal desire. in New Statesman 23 March 1962; attributed [ dancing ] a perpendicular perpendicular expression horizontal desire England and America are two countries divided by a common language. attributed in this and other forms, but not found in Shaw's published writings England and America divided England...

James Dewey Watson 1928–  and Francis Crick 1916–2004

James Dewey Watson 1928–  and Francis Crick 1916–2004   Reference library

Francis Crick

Oxford Dictionary of Scientific Quotations

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
594 words

..., 1953, 171 , 737 radically different structure salt of deoxyribose nucleic acid structure has two helical chains The novel feature of the structure is the manner in which the two chains are held together by the purine and pyrimidine bases. The planes of the bases are perpendicular to the fibre axis. They are joined together in pairs, a single base from one chain being hydrogen-bonded to a single base from the other chain, so that the two lie side by side with identical z-co-ordinates. One of the pair must be a purine and the other a pyrimidine for...

George Bernard Shaw

George Bernard Shaw (1856–1950)   Quick reference

Oxford Essential Quotations (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
2,752 words

...and your brains? Hesketh Pearson Bernard Shaw (1942); versions of this exist from the 1920s on, attributing the remarks to Shaw and also to Anatole France and Isadora Duncan: see Quote Investigator [ Dancing is ] a perpendicular expression of a horizontal desire. in New Statesman 23 March 1962 [ dancing is ] a perpendicular perpendicular expression of horizontal horizontal desire England and America are two countries divided by a common language. attributed in this and other forms to George Bernard Shaw, but not found in Shaw's published writings; see...

George Bernard Shaw

George Bernard Shaw (1856–1950)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
3,387 words

...version of the outcome of a conversation between Shaw and Sam goldwyn Alva Johnson The Great Goldwyn (1937) ch. 3 only interested in art only interested in art only interested in money [ Dancing is ] a perpendicular expression of a horizontal desire. in New Statesman 23 March 1962 [ dancing ] a perpendicular expression perpendicular expression of horizontal horizontal ...

Galileo Galilei

Galileo Galilei (1564–1642)   Reference library

Francis Crick

Oxford Dictionary of Scientific Quotations

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
2,772 words

...one common to the Earth, the tower, and ourselves remains imperceptible. There remains perceptible to us only that of the stone, which is not shared by us; and, because of this, sense shows it as by a straight line, always parallel to the tower, which is built upright and perpendicular upon the terrestrial surface. Dialogue on the Great World Systems (1632). Revised and Annotated by Giorgio De Santillana (1953), 177 simple motion of descent motion of descent Take note, theologians, that in your desire to make matters of faith out of propositions relating...

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