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Perpendicular

Denoting the latest stage of English Gothic church architecture, prevalent from the late 14th to mid 16th centuries and characterized by broad arches, elaborate fan vaulting, and large ...

Perpendicular

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The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

... denoting the latest stage of English Gothic church architecture, prevalent from the late 14th to mid 16th centuries and characterized by broad arches, elaborate fan vaulting, and large windows with vertical...

perpendicular

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The Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
74 words

... [LME] Those who remember school geometry lessons involving instructions to ‘drop a perpendicular’ may not be surprised to find that the source of this word is Latin perpendiculum ‘plumb line’, formed from per - ‘through’ and pendere ‘to hang’. The first recorded use of the loosened sense ‘very steep’ is found in Shakespeare 's ‘That sprightly Son of Scots, Douglas, that runs a-horseback up a hill perpendicular’ ( Henry IV, Part I , Act 2 scene...

perpendicular

perpendicular   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
43 words

... situated or having a direction at right angles XIV (not gen. current till XVI); applied to the third style of English pointed architecture XIX; sb. XVI. — L. perpendiculāris , f. perpendiculum plummet, plumb-line, f. PER- 2 + pendēre hang; see PENDENT , -CULE , -AR...

Log

Log   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...An instrument for measuring the speed of a ship. In its simplest form it is a flat piece of wood, some 6in (15cm) in radius, in the shape of a quadrant, and made so that it will float perpendicularly. To this is fastened the log-line, which is knotted at intervals. See also knot . Logbook In a ship the journal in which the logs are entered. It also contains the general record of proceedings on board, especially the navigational and meteorological records. The word later came to be used for the document that gave the ownership and other details of a motor...

Leaning Tower of Pisa

Leaning Tower of Pisa   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

...Tower of Pisa the circular bell tower of Pisa cathedral, which leans about 5 m (17 ft) from the perpendicular over its height of 55 m (181...

Decorated

Decorated   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

...denoting a stage of English Gothic church architecture typical of the 14th century (between Early English and Perpendicular), with increasing use of decoration and geometrical, curvilinear, and reticulated...

Cartesian

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The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

...or relating to the ideas of the philosopher René Descartes ( 1596–1650 ), deriving from Cartesius , the Latinized form of his name. Cartesian coordinates numbers which indicate the location of a point relative to a fixed reference point (the origin), being its shortest (perpendicular) distances from two fixed axes (or three planes defined by three fixed axes) which intersect at right angles at the...

Gothic

Gothic   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

...in the 12th–16th centuries (and revived in the mid 18th to early 20th centuries), characterized by pointed arches, rib vaults, and flying buttresses, together with large windows and elaborate tracery. English Gothic architecture is divided into Early English, Decorated, and Perpendicular. The word comes via French or late Latin from Gothi ‘the Goths’, and was used in the 17th and 18th centuries to mean ‘not classical’ (i.e. not Greek or Roman), and hence to refer to medieval architecture which did not follow classical models and a typeface based on medieval...

aplomb

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The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
16 words

...†perpendicularity, steadiness; selfpossession. XIX. — F., f. phr. à plomb according to the plummet ( see PLUMB...

upright

upright   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
39 words

...erect, perpendicular OE.; †lying on the back OE. (late); of unbending rectitude XVI; sb. †vertical face; architectural elevation XVII; upright part or member. OE. upriht , corr. to (M)Du. oprecht , OHG. ūfreht (G. aufrecht ), ON. upréttr ; see UP- , RIGHT...

bluff

bluff 1   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
31 words

...1 nearly vertical or perpendicular XVII; rough, blunt XVIII; good-naturedly curt or abrupt XIX. orig. naut., perh. of LG. orig. As sb. broad precipitous headland XVII (first in N....

norm

norm   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
38 words

...XIX. — L. norma carpenter's square, pattern, rule. So normal ( -AL 1 ) rectangular, perpendicular XVII; conforming to a standard XIX ( n. school , after F. école normale ). — F. normal or (of schools) L. normālis . Hence normalcy, normality, normalize...

vertex

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The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
47 words

...(geom.) point opposite the base XVI; zenith XVII; top, summit. — L. vertex , vertic- whirl, vortex, crown of the head, highest point, f vertere turn. So vertical pert. to the zenith XVI; perpendicular, at right angles to the axis, etc. XVIII. — F. or late L.; see -AL 1...

rake

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The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
46 words

...2 (naut.) projection of hull at stem and stern beyond the keel line. XVII. f. rake vb. (XVII) have a rake, incline from the perpendicular; of unkn. orig. Hence rakish 1 ( -ISH 1 ) having a smart appearance like a fast-sailing ship. XIX (partly assoc. with...

sheer

sheer 1   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
46 words

...1 †bright, shining; (of fabrics) thin, fine; unmixed, unqualified XVI; rising perpendicularly without a break XVIII. prob. alt. of (dial.) shire clear, pure, mere, thin, weak, OE. sċīr = OS. skīr(i) , ON. skírr , Goth. skeirs :- Gmc. * skīraz , * skīrjaz , f. * skí- SHINE...

plumb

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The Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
251 words

...[ME] You can say that something which is not quite perpendicular is out of plumb . This draws on the original meaning of plumb, a ball of lead attached to a string to determine a vertical line, or a plumb line . Another early use was as a term for a sounding lead used for measuring the depth of water. To plumb a body of water was to measure its depth in this way, and is the source of the phrase plumb the depths . The source of plumb is Latin plumbum ‘lead’, also the root of plumber . Medieval plumbers dealt in and worked with lead, and it was not...

Mercator projection

Mercator projection   Quick reference

A New Dictionary of Eponyms

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
216 words

...map making, adjusting for the difference between a flat surface (used for all maps) and the earth's curves, scaling and projecting each point on the map. He then devised the world as a globe rather than a cone, setting up on his cylindrical charts meridians as straight lines perpendicular to the equator and latitudes as straight lines parallel to the equator. This innovation made navigating simpler and safer and came to be known as Mercator projection . Mercator was accused of heresy, and fled to Duisberg, Germany in 1559 . He accepted the Chair of...

mansard

mansard   Quick reference

A New Dictionary of Eponyms

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
283 words

...A mansard roof, instead of forming an inverted V, has rafters that are broken up and the lower slope is almost perpendicular, the upper more nearly flat; thus it has a double slope on each side. The roof allows for high rooms and useful space within the building. The lower slope of the roof, fitted with dormer windows, forms an additional story to the house. In the seventeenth century, Parisian householders were taxed according to the number of stories they had “under roof.” This design enabled the house owner to have an added story, unseen, without...

Maxwell's equations

Maxwell's equations   Quick reference

A New Dictionary of Eponyms

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
258 words

...top blended together when the top was spun. His mathematical studies of the motion of molecules in gas proved that all molecules do not move at the same speed. Maxwell is best known for a unit of magnetic flux called the maxwell . A maxwell is a unit equal to the flux perpendicularly intersecting an area of one square centimeter in a region where the magnetic induction is one...

Paly

Paly   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...In heraldry , this means divided perpendicularly into an even number of equal...

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